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Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim
Author: David Sedaris
Publisher: Published January 1st 2004 by Little Brown & Co.
ISBN: 9780965904834
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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David Sedaris plays in the snow with his sisters. He goes on vacation with his family. He gets a job selling drinks. He attends his brother's wedding. He mops his sister's floor. He gives directions to a lost traveler. He eats a hamburger. He has his blood sugar tested. It all sounds so normal, doesn't it? In this collection of essays, Sedaris lifts the corner of ordinary David Sedaris plays in the snow with his sisters. He goes on vacation with his family. He gets a job selling drinks. He attends his brother's wedding. He mops his sister's floor. He gives directions to a lost traveler. He eats a hamburger. He has his blood sugar tested. It all sounds so normal, doesn't it? In this collection of essays, Sedaris lifts the corner of ordinary life, revealing the absurdity teeming below its surface. His world is alive with obscure desires and hidden motives--a world where forgiveness is automatic and an argument can be the highest form of love. Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim is another unforgettable collection from one of the wittiest and most original writers at work today.

30 review for Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    The Sedaris family is certifiably crazy and I love them. Out of everything he's produced (I've read all of his major work and only missed a few short pieces) this is my favorite David Sedaris book. Yet, I don't recommend it... ...not always, not to everyone. The subject matter can be too much for some people, especially if they've been told that David Sedaris is a humorist and then they encounter some the more depressing details of his real life experiences. I laugh my ass off at the bottom-feede The Sedaris family is certifiably crazy and I love them. Out of everything he's produced (I've read all of his major work and only missed a few short pieces) this is my favorite David Sedaris book. Yet, I don't recommend it... ...not always, not to everyone. The subject matter can be too much for some people, especially if they've been told that David Sedaris is a humorist and then they encounter some the more depressing details of his real life experiences. I laugh my ass off at the bottom-feeder personalities and occasional bargain basement morals herein, but some people will wring their hands and cry, "Oh how awful!" Get over it and enjoy the ride, is my approach. The ride includes experiences of being gay and coming out (horrible and hilarious!), portraits of various family members that bring the people as vividly alive as any long-running sitcom is capable, and living on his own for the first time, which includes apartment living in general and specifically the trials of low-income housing. Sedaris is a master at autobiographical essays. These short form pieces about his life read like carnival folklore, so seemingly unreal at times it feels surreal. Some of his other books are not quite so warts-and-all. If you try Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim on for size, realize it may not suit you. Perhaps try on another first and ease your way into this strange fashion. Audiobook Note: Listening to Sedaris read the audiobook is a must. He wrote the stories, hell, he lived the stories, so he knows how they're to be read. I've listened to him enough now that I can not only read his work in his voice, but also accurately guess at the necessary inflection in new material. Yeah, it's a gift...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ I think by this point it’s pretty much common knowledge that I love David Sedaris like a fat kid I love cake and, well . . . . . Dress Your Family In Corduroy and Denim might be my favorite collection yet. I could seriously kick myself for not only not trying audiobooks before this Fall, but also for not thinking of collections like these as something that would fit into my short commute time perfectly. We’re talking true . . . . Eve Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ I think by this point it’s pretty much common knowledge that I love David Sedaris like a fat kid I love cake and, well . . . . . Dress Your Family In Corduroy and Denim might be my favorite collection yet. I could seriously kick myself for not only not trying audiobooks before this Fall, but also for not thinking of collections like these as something that would fit into my short commute time perfectly. We’re talking true . . . . Even while in a stupid ass Fiat rather than a Volkswagen since mine decided to die like a whore on the corner a few months back. And when work got like WAAAAAAY too worky the other day and I was afraid I was going to full out pull a Milton . . . . Or a Leslie Knope . . . . I opted to schedule a mental health vacay day instead and went home to immerse myself in my favorite type of therapy this time of year – decorating Christmas trees (with an added bonus of listening to the soothing sounds of David’s dysfunction this go ‘round). Dress Your Family was a great blend of stories of the Sedaris children and parents (words cannot express how much I adore Sharon, their mother), the Sedaris children as adults, David and Hugh and everything in between. Thanks to the combo of some sort of sinus condition/basement dust I lugged upstairs along with the decorations, I laughed until I was overtaken by an emphysema-ish coughing fit/wheeze that may or may not have concluded with me urinating a bit on myself - and if THAT isn’t an endorsement, I don’t know what is. I’ve put a hold on every other available Sedaris audio in order to get myself through the end of the year without (hopefully) causing bodily harm to anyone at work. Now I just have to deal with a cat who is terrified of Santa’s impending visit after hearing the story of “6 to 8 Black Men”. . . . . No it isn’t. Read the story. Anyway, I keep telling him we don’t live in Amsterdam so he doesn’t have anything to worry about, but I think it’s pretty obvious by the look on his face that he doesn’t believe me . . . .

  3. 5 out of 5

    Fabian

    Okay so the Chip Kidd covers usually ruins authors like this for me. These covers almost ooze a Wes Anderson-type Americana... I'll let prejudices slip past. So this writer has a following and it is understandable. This guy CAN WRITE. And topping that: he can write short stories. I am very ambivalent about short vignettes or even the lofty novella: why don't writers just extend the s**t out of whatever story they are writing to fit the perimeters of the novel? O so close. Sedaris observes, writes. Okay so the Chip Kidd covers usually ruins authors like this for me. These covers almost ooze a Wes Anderson-type Americana... I'll let prejudices slip past. So this writer has a following and it is understandable. This guy CAN WRITE. And topping that: he can write short stories. I am very ambivalent about short vignettes or even the lofty novella: why don't writers just extend the s**t out of whatever story they are writing to fit the perimeters of the novel? O so close. Sedaris observes, writes. He's underwhelmingly unextraordinary, but his voice sures gots sass. I have known someone the exact prototype of this Woody Allenesque guy: all style no substance. Yes-- keen, keen like a knife. But what ties it all? Why are these so damn popular? Sometimes, the collective I.Q. ... I want to read more of this self-centered pedant. He ain't all that, though. This must be mentioned.

  4. 4 out of 5

    karen

    this is a book by david sedaris. shrug. i mean, what else am i supposed to say? it's not like he went out on a limb here and wrote a space opera or a bodice ripper. it's david sedaris. if you like him, you will probably like this one. if you don't, you probably won't. this is not my favorite of his collections, but i laughed out loud three times, which i think is pretty good. i like laughter. **one time, connor made david sedaris laugh. he has yet to write a story about this incident, but we are all this is a book by david sedaris. shrug. i mean, what else am i supposed to say? it's not like he went out on a limb here and wrote a space opera or a bodice ripper. it's david sedaris. if you like him, you will probably like this one. if you don't, you probably won't. this is not my favorite of his collections, but i laughed out loud three times, which i think is pretty good. i like laughter. **one time, connor made david sedaris laugh. he has yet to write a story about this incident, but we are all holding our breaths and waiting.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ I think I may have broken free of the endless Sedaris loop which I have had playing in my car, but I’m sure I’ll return to it eventually. If for no other reason than to hear about . . . . . I will tell you, audio is the ONLY way to go when it comes to stories about the youngest Sedaris – be it David or Amy’s impersonation, you’ll be hard-pressed not to look like a hysterical maniac if driving while listening. When my sisters and I even Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ I think I may have broken free of the endless Sedaris loop which I have had playing in my car, but I’m sure I’ll return to it eventually. If for no other reason than to hear about . . . . . I will tell you, audio is the ONLY way to go when it comes to stories about the youngest Sedaris – be it David or Amy’s impersonation, you’ll be hard-pressed not to look like a hysterical maniac if driving while listening. When my sisters and I eventually left home, it seemed like a natural progression–young adults shifting from one environment to another. While our departures had been relatively painless, Paul’s was like releasing a domestic animal into the wild. He knew how to plan a meal but displayed a remarkable lack of patience when it came time for the actual cooking. Frozen dinners were often eaten exactly as sold, the Salisbury steak amounting to a stickless meat Popsicle. I phoned one night just as he was leaning a family pack of frozen chicken wings against the back door. He’d forgotten to defrost them and was now attempting to stomp the solid mass into three six-inch portions, which he’d force into his toaster oven. I heard the singular sound of boot against crystallized meat and listened as my brother panted for breath. “Goddamned … fucking … chicken … wings.” I called again the following evening and was told that after all that work, the chicken had been spoiled. It tasted like fish, so he threw it away and called it a night. A few hours later, having decided that spoiled chicken was better than no chicken at all, he got out of bed, stepped outside in his underpants, and proceeded to eat the leftovers directly from the garbage can. I was mortified. “In your underpants?” “Damned straight,” he said. “Rooster ain’t getting dressed up to eat no fish-assed-tasting chicken.” All the Stars.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    I thought I was over David Sedaris. I don't mean that I don't like him. I do. His essays are funny, but after a while they all seem to run together. He mines the same territory again and again -- stories of growing up with his dysfunctional, quirky, yet lovable family. Stories of himself as the odd and awkward kid growing up and trying to figure out how to live in this world. I wasn’t going to buy Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim in print, but I saw the audio version, read by Sedaris himse I thought I was over David Sedaris. I don't mean that I don't like him. I do. His essays are funny, but after a while they all seem to run together. He mines the same territory again and again -- stories of growing up with his dysfunctional, quirky, yet lovable family. Stories of himself as the odd and awkward kid growing up and trying to figure out how to live in this world. I wasn’t going to buy Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim in print, but I saw the audio version, read by Sedaris himself, on sale at CompUSA when they were going out of business and selling their entire inventory for cheap. I couldn’t resist even though I much prefer to read books rather than to listen to them. I did nothing with it for more than a year until I decided I should listen to it while going for walks around my neighborhood. I found myself rolling my eyes, not laughing, and quickly becoming bored. Finally I had the idea to take the book with me when I drove places. I felt I would get through it much quicker that way and could finally move on to something else. It turned out that that was the way to listen to David Sedaris. Walking around the neighborhood while thinking about the pain in my hip and how at 38 years old I’m afraid I’m going to have to have a fucking hip replacement is no way to appreciate him. I just wanted to slap the shit out of him and his idiosyncratic family/neighbors/and everyone else he was talking about. Relaxed and driving on the freeway with his pleasant voice in my ear was the way to go. In fact, I enjoyed it so much that it made me want to listen to his books rather than read them, which was kind of a first for me. That being said, it’s not going to come as a big surprise that this collection is more of the same types of stories we’ve heard in the past, but I have to say that Sedaris really shines when he talks about his sister, Tiffany, and his brother, Paul (a.k.a. The Rooster). Those were my favorites in the collection. I was also sad to learn that Sedaris’s mother, Sharon, has passed away. I’ll never forget his Ya-Ya refusing to call Sharon by her name and stubbornly referring to her as “The Girl” because she was pissed she wasn’t Greek. And if you already know and love The Rooster, man are you in for a treat when Sedaris reads in Paul’s voice. Something about this charming, well-spoken man saying the words “She had tubes coming out of her pussy” in a thick southern accent cracked me up more than reading it on the page ever could.

  7. 5 out of 5

    David

    So. David Sedaris. Well, let's be clear. Nobody with a funnybone can hate David Sedaris. And neither do I. But it has to be said - that last book ("Dress your family in corduroy and denim") was quite a disappointment. Judging by the number of people showing up for his readings here in San Francisco, and its lengthy sojourn on The New York Times bestseller list, it obviously did pretty well commercially. And, based on the enormous amount of accumulated goodwill from his earlier books, I don't beg So. David Sedaris. Well, let's be clear. Nobody with a funnybone can hate David Sedaris. And neither do I. But it has to be said - that last book ("Dress your family in corduroy and denim") was quite a disappointment. Judging by the number of people showing up for his readings here in San Francisco, and its lengthy sojourn on The New York Times bestseller list, it obviously did pretty well commercially. And, based on the enormous amount of accumulated goodwill from his earlier books, I don't begrudge DS his commercial success. Not one bit. Well, OK. Maybe just a little bit. Because, for the first time, in this collection, we see clear indications that Sedaris is bumping up against his limitations. How so? I think (and make no claim for the originality of this analysis) it's because Sedaris is at his best when he writes from the point of view of slightly marginalized outsider. In his earlier stuff, he was poor, he's gay and he managed to achieve a tone of bemusement in reporting what went on around him that was completely hilarious. In the face of increasing commercial success, the edge that was conferred by his being poor became harder to maintain. But he and his boyfriend moved to France, thereby achieving automatic outsider status, and Sedaris was able to mine this for comedy gold (his accounts of misadventures while learning French are truly funny, and credit must be given for the way in which he makes the comedy seem so effortless). But that's his previous book Me Talk Pretty One Day. Problem is, the whole 'marginalized outsider' position seems less and less plausible for an author whose books spend months on the best seller list. Similarly, after a few years in France, the forces of assimilation are bound to cut down on the number of amusing misunderstandings funny enough to be worth writing about. This leaves one other area which Sedaris has mined fruitfully in previous books - anecdotes about his family. Indeed, the majority of the stories in this latest collection are family-based anecdotes. However, the stories in this collection do not come close to matching the wit and poignancy of those in earlier books, suggesting that this vein of inspiration may be close to being tapped out. Hardly surprising - any author would lead with the funniest material; this collection has occasional flashes of wit, but never reaches the 'laugh-out-loud' quality of the earlier books. Several pieces in this collection (describing his brother's wedding, his job one summer at the State Fair) are downright pedestrian, and a couple of pieces just fall flat - ruminations about apartment-hunting while visiting the Anne Frank house, accounts of visits with two of his sisters, whose feelings about being featured as bit-players in this, or subsequent collections are decidedly mixed. It's to Sedaris's credit that he too is ambivalent on this point, but his soul-searching on the issue doesn't make for interesting reading. One of Yeats's later poems is called "The Circus Animals' Desertion"; in it, he bemoans the fact that the themes which inspired him early in his career have lost their inspirational power. "Dress your family in corduroy and denim" supports the notion that David Sedaris may be experiencing similar difficulties. But don't count him out yet. His previous books estalished Sedaris as a hilarious, extremely talented writer. Anyone can have one bad book. Let's hope he will leave it at that.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This book makes me laugh myself sick every time I read it. Blood Work and La Nuit of the Dead are put together so perfectly. Sedaris creates a series of misguided attempts at human connection that seem doomed to fail through selfishness or insecurity, but somehow don’t. Sedaris is so good at exposing the frailty of those emotional connections without ever doubting that they can still sustain our relationships. He makes me relate to even the most impossibly awkward and painful situations. Every t This book makes me laugh myself sick every time I read it. Blood Work and La Nuit of the Dead are put together so perfectly. Sedaris creates a series of misguided attempts at human connection that seem doomed to fail through selfishness or insecurity, but somehow don’t. Sedaris is so good at exposing the frailty of those emotional connections without ever doubting that they can still sustain our relationships. He makes me relate to even the most impossibly awkward and painful situations. Every time I read it I think, “That’s so ME!” And then realize that I’m not a gay man living in rural France, fearing zombies and drowning a mouse in a bucket at midnight. And yet somehow I can still not only relate to the situation, but feel the familiarity of it. The parts about his brother make me miss my brother horribly. Sedaris is so great at showing that most of our love for each other doesn’t lie in our similarities, but in the strength of our shared history and our sheer will to maintain the relationship. This can seem either damaged and pathetic or comforting and hopeful. I’m going with the latter.

  9. 5 out of 5

    . . . _ _ _ . . .

    Ο Αμερικάνος Κορτώ μας λέει (ξανά) για τον γκόμενο του, τη μάνα του, τα αδέρφια του *φωνή Σταυρίδη στα Κίτρινα Γάντια* ΑΧΟΥ ΚΑΙ ΔΕ ΜΕ ΝΟΙΑΖΕΙ Κάπου πιάνει μια μελαγχολία, και αυτό είναι που τον ξεχωρίζει κάπως, αλλά στην πραγματικότητα διαβάζεις ημερολόγια μιας οικογένειας που ούτε τους ξέρεις, ούτε σε πολυνοιάζει. Να μην πιάσω το γεγονός το ανατριχιαστικό ξεπούλημα ζωών της ίδιας του της οικογένειας (πχ τον τρόπο ζωής μιας αδερφής του που λίγα χρόνια μετά αυτοκτόνησε με συνθήκες ζωής ανατριχιαστικά Ο Αμερικάνος Κορτώ μας λέει (ξανά) για τον γκόμενο του, τη μάνα του, τα αδέρφια του *φωνή Σταυρίδη στα Κίτρινα Γάντια* ΑΧΟΥ ΚΑΙ ΔΕ ΜΕ ΝΟΙΑΖΕΙ Κάπου πιάνει μια μελαγχολία, και αυτό είναι που τον ξεχωρίζει κάπως, αλλά στην πραγματικότητα διαβάζεις ημερολόγια μιας οικογένειας που ούτε τους ξέρεις, ούτε σε πολυνοιάζει. Να μην πιάσω το γεγονός το ανατριχιαστικό ξεπούλημα ζωών της ίδιας του της οικογένειας (πχ τον τρόπο ζωής μιας αδερφής του που λίγα χρόνια μετά αυτοκτόνησε με συνθήκες ζωής ανατριχιαστικά ίδιες με αυτά που περιγράφει στο διήγημα του) Επίσης, ξέρω είναι δύσκολο να βρεις ένα καλό σπίτι, αλλά να στήσεις ένα ολόκληρο διήγημα για το αν πωλείται το σπίτι της Άννας Φρανκ, και το πόσο γαμάτο είναι, να μην προλάβει να το αγοράσει κανένας άλλος, για μένα δεν είναι ακριβώς comedy material.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ginger

    Another good collection of short stories by David Sedaris! 3.5 stars! I decided to do the audiobook for Dress Your Family In Corduroy And Denim and I’m glad I did. At times, his voice bugged me a bit. It was more indifferent then I liked, and I know he was going for deadpan. But at the same time, David Sedaris is cynical, funny and does the best job of explaining his crazy family and all his neurotic thoughts. Boy does he have a lot of neurotic thoughts!! Ha! I think we all do at times. His humor Another good collection of short stories by David Sedaris! 3.5 stars! I decided to do the audiobook for Dress Your Family In Corduroy And Denim and I’m glad I did. At times, his voice bugged me a bit. It was more indifferent then I liked, and I know he was going for deadpan. But at the same time, David Sedaris is cynical, funny and does the best job of explaining his crazy family and all his neurotic thoughts. Boy does he have a lot of neurotic thoughts!! Ha! I think we all do at times. His humor is not for everyone though. He is often dark and dry, and you often wonder if he’s being funny or truthful. I enjoy this type of humor for its subtlety and honesty. The short stories that I enjoyed the most were: 1. The neighborhood family that didn’t watch television 2. Christmas in the Netherlands (I laughed out loud at least 2 to 3 times!!!) 3. The misunderstanding erotic house cleaning service 4. His brother’s wedding. It seems that most of the family members are funny on their own but add them all together and it’s a great recipe for some good chuckles!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    Honestly, I tried to like this book. Maybe it's one of those that, at page 100, kicks everything glorious into overdrive, making you gleeful and giddy and full of delight at reading it. Maybe I should have read further and waited longer. But, you see, I only really started to read this because it seemed hip at the time to do so. I'm not too sure that I care enough about maintaining some form of imagined quasi-hipness to make myself sit through the rest of it. There. I'm admitting I didn't read t Honestly, I tried to like this book. Maybe it's one of those that, at page 100, kicks everything glorious into overdrive, making you gleeful and giddy and full of delight at reading it. Maybe I should have read further and waited longer. But, you see, I only really started to read this because it seemed hip at the time to do so. I'm not too sure that I care enough about maintaining some form of imagined quasi-hipness to make myself sit through the rest of it. There. I'm admitting I didn't read the whole thing, but I am admitting (and openly so) that David Sedaris depresses me. The end.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    Just as reliably entertaining as his previous books!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Good

    oh so hilarious... "What the hell are you doing?" she whispered, but my mouth was too full to answer...as she closed the door and behind her and moved toward my bed, I began breaking the wax lips and candy necklaces pulled from pile no. 2. These were the second-best things I had received, and while it hurt to destroy them, it would have hurt evern more to give them away. I had just started to mutilate a miniature box of Red Hots when my mother pried them from my hands, accidentally finishing the oh so hilarious... "What the hell are you doing?" she whispered, but my mouth was too full to answer...as she closed the door and behind her and moved toward my bed, I began breaking the wax lips and candy necklaces pulled from pile no. 2. These were the second-best things I had received, and while it hurt to destroy them, it would have hurt evern more to give them away. I had just started to mutilate a miniature box of Red Hots when my mother pried them from my hands, accidentally finishing the job for me. BB-size pellets clattered onto the floor, and as I followed them with my eyes, she snatched up a roll of Necco wafers. "Not those," I pleaded, but rather than words, my mouth expelled chocolate, chewed chocolate, which fell onto the sleece of her sweater. "Not those. Not those." She shook her arm, and the mound of chocolate dropped like a horrible turd upon my bedspread. "You should look at yourself," she said. "I mean, really look at yourself."

  14. 5 out of 5

    fortuna.spinning

    "I might reinvent myself to strangers, but to this day, as far as my family is concerned, I’m still the one most likely to set your house on fire." Rereading David Sedaris (nonfiction) via audio has been so fun! I loved his books before, but he's now solidified a spot among my favorite authors. He is such an amazing story teller. His last lines are always perfect.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lucy

    What if you could write about whatever you wanted? What if no topics were off limits, no person's feelings or privacy taken into consideration, no personal flaws purposely left unmentioned in order to be protected from ridicule? You would probably write exactly like David Sedaris. To actually write like David Sedaris, however, you'd also have to be intelligent, impeccably attentive to details and most importantly - uncommonly funny. With that winning combination, Sedaris's unencumbered writing cre What if you could write about whatever you wanted? What if no topics were off limits, no person's feelings or privacy taken into consideration, no personal flaws purposely left unmentioned in order to be protected from ridicule? You would probably write exactly like David Sedaris. To actually write like David Sedaris, however, you'd also have to be intelligent, impeccably attentive to details and most importantly - uncommonly funny. With that winning combination, Sedaris's unencumbered writing creates a truly fascinating look into his life and way of thinking. Take, for instance, a neighborhood family that supposedly doesn't watch any television. You've know them, or at least heard about them. But have you hidden yourself in bushes outside their house watching them at night? Sedaris spied on this family with fascination, watching them interact at the dinner table during the evenings and feeling sorry for the absence of television in their lives. After watching one of their children at school being left out of a joke that made reference to a TV show, Sedaris writes, "It occurred to me that they needed a guide, someone who could point out all the things they were unable to understand. I could have done it on weekends, but friendship would have taken away their mystery and interfered with the good feeling I got from pitying them. So I kept my distance." Then, when this same family showed up for Trick-Or-Treating the day after Halloween, Sedaris expresses what must be universally believed: "Asking for candy on Halloween was called trick-or-treating, but asking for candy on November first was called begging, and it made people uncomfortable. This was one of the things you were supposed to learn simply by being alive, and it angered me that the Tomkeys did not understand it." The subject matter varies wildly from chapter to chapter, but each contains Sedaris's hilarious spin on what would probably appear to most outsiders, nothing to write home about. Although there are several uncomfortable chapters that touch on situations involving his homosexuality, his willingness to expose himself, and, I suppose his willingness to expose his loved ones, give his writing an important and appreciated perspective. It's so enjoyably honest! I mean, he writes about going through the Anne Frank House while simultaneous apartment hunting and wanting to live there because it's "cute." Totally irreverent. But when he talks about ripping out the wood stove so that the fireplace would be the focal point and thinking the attic, with its charming dormer windows, could be his office...it ends up being really funny. The best chapter for me was called Six To Eight Black Men when he describes in laugh-out-loud detail the Christmas traditions in the Netherlands. Of course he begins the chapter by pointing out some of the more unusual local gun laws in various states of the USA, mentioning as an interesting fact that in Michigan - blind people are allowed to hunt...alone. As the chapter nears its end, and you wonder what the two stories have to do with each other, he finishes by sharing his thoughts while sitting in a Dutch train station. "I couldn't help but feel second-rate. Yes, the Netherlands was a small country, but it had six to eight black men and a really good bedtime story. Being a fairly competitive person, I felt jealous, then bitter. I was edging toward hostile when I remembered the blind hunter tramping off alone into the Michigan forest. He may bag a deer, or he may happily shoot a camper in the stomach. He may find his way back to the car, or he may wander around for a week or two before stumbling through your back door. We don't know for sure, but in pinning that license to his chest, he inspires the sort of narrative that ultimately makes me proud to be an American." Funny, funny stuff.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Takisx

    Σ'αυτές τις ιστορίες ανακαλύπτεις και ησυχάζεις, το πόσο ίδιες μπορεί να μοιάζουν οι οικογένειες των ανθρωπων, σε σημεία ανατριχιαστικά. Βέβαια δεν σε πέταξε ο μπαμπάς σου απ'το σπίτι, επειδή η παραλίγο και ξώφαλτση ομοφυλοφυλία σου πολύ τον ενοχλούσε, ούτε σε πήγε η μαμά σου κλαίγοντας σε ενα καταλλημα για να σε σώσει. Από ποιόν; Ούτε κι αυτή ξέρει. Δεν ζει βέβαια η μαμά για να μάθει την συνέχεια, αλλά τι σημασία έχει; Ο Σεντάρις είναι τόσο καλά εκπαιδευμένος στο κύνισμό, που δεν θα επιτρέψει σ Σ'αυτές τις ιστορίες ανακαλύπτεις και ησυχάζεις, το πόσο ίδιες μπορεί να μοιάζουν οι οικογένειες των ανθρωπων, σε σημεία ανατριχιαστικά. Βέβαια δεν σε πέταξε ο μπαμπάς σου απ'το σπίτι, επειδή η παραλίγο και ξώφαλτση ομοφυλοφυλία σου πολύ τον ενοχλούσε, ούτε σε πήγε η μαμά σου κλαίγοντας σε ενα καταλλημα για να σε σώσει. Από ποιόν; Ούτε κι αυτή ξέρει. Δεν ζει βέβαια η μαμά για να μάθει την συνέχεια, αλλά τι σημασία έχει; Ο Σεντάρις είναι τόσο καλά εκπαιδευμένος στο κύνισμό, που δεν θα επιτρέψει σε κανέναν να βάλει το χέρι του στο ωμο του για να τον λυπηθεί. Μπορεί να μην ξέρει ακριβώς ποιός είναι, αλλά μου φαίνεται πως ούτε που τον νοιάζει και να μάθει. (εκρηκτικός)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Pixelina

    The last episode 'Nuit of the living dead' had me break down in tears from laughing so hard. A lot of the other chapters are funny, but I read it before in other Sedaris books. I just need to think 'Oh I see you have a little swimming mouse' to start laughing like mad though. Someone told me I should try and get one of his books on audio cause it is even funnier hearing him reading it. Will try that for sure.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    I didn't like this book. I got the audio book to listen to on one of my drives. I couldn't finish it. I heard good things about it...that it was hilarious and that David Sedaris is great...but I just couldn't get into it. I think I forced a laugh out once just to remember what it felt like to laugh. It didn't feel right so I stopped.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim is a hilarious book about David Sedaris's life and family. It starts off when he was a young boy and he has to give up his Halloween candy to the neighbors. He then stuffed as much candy in his face as possible so he wouldn't have to share it. I knew right after this chapter that I was going to like this book. As you read further in the book you learn all about his family like his brother, Paul, the rooster. Different events occur in this book that tell yo Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim is a hilarious book about David Sedaris's life and family. It starts off when he was a young boy and he has to give up his Halloween candy to the neighbors. He then stuffed as much candy in his face as possible so he wouldn't have to share it. I knew right after this chapter that I was going to like this book. As you read further in the book you learn all about his family like his brother, Paul, the rooster. Different events occur in this book that tell you a lot about David and his family. Like in the chapter the Girl Next Door, David meets a young girl neighbor and begins spending time with her and discovers she doens't know what France is, so he helps her with maps and such. I personally liked the chapter "Rooster at the Hitchin' Post" because of all the humor in it and it shows the relationship David has between his brother and him. David Sedaris tells the story of his life very well, and in a funny way. I would recommend this book to everyone because it is a great book to read over and over, as I did with many of the chapters.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Miranda Reads

    David Sedaris being David Sedaris. I would hate to be in his family. Every bit of dirty laundry ends up in a book! Review to come. Audiobook Comments Read by the author! Woohoo! Blog | Instagram | Twitter

  21. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    Sometimes cynical, sometimes neurotic, always entertaining. These stories are great for a few laughs and just might make you think. Often Sedaris says what we are thinking, but too afraid to say out loud.

  22. 4 out of 5

    E.

    highly entertaining!! Edit: 5 Nov 18 Reread Still like it

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michael Kneeland

    Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim delves further into the fascinating, hilarious, and otherwise utterly bizarre life of David Sedaris and his family. This collection of his essays is quite good--among my favorites of his--because throughout most of it, he manages to find a moving balance between the tragic and the comic. Take, for instance, "The Ship Shape," about how his family almost bought a summer home, but ultimately lost out on the chance because of his father's fickleness with money Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim delves further into the fascinating, hilarious, and otherwise utterly bizarre life of David Sedaris and his family. This collection of his essays is quite good--among my favorites of his--because throughout most of it, he manages to find a moving balance between the tragic and the comic. Take, for instance, "The Ship Shape," about how his family almost bought a summer home, but ultimately lost out on the chance because of his father's fickleness with money. The essay starts off humorously enough, with plenty of zany details, like the absurd names his family comes up with for the summer home in question. But by the end, we have a rather melancholic picture painted of the family, headed by a father who would like to give his family something nice like a summer home on the beach, but is just too fickle to actually go through with it. Then there is "Hejira," about how Sedaris' father kicked him out of the house seemingly because he was an unemployed college dropout whose number of bong hits surpassed his number of trips out of the house, but really, we learn, because he was gay. We have plenty of funny anecdotes throughout, giving us hilarious images of Sedaris sitting stoned in his room listening to the same Joni Mitchell record over and over again, but by the end, we see ultimately see a father who finds his son so unacceptable that he removes him from the situation. From reading his other works, we know that Sedaris and his father eventually mended ways, but as "Hejira" closes, we only see a depressed young man wanting to be acknowledged for being, as he puts it, "special." Of course, there is also plenty of outright absurdity, such as "Six to Eight Black Men," which I have my students read each year during the holiday season; and "Rooster at the Hitchin' Post," which is on the outset about his obnoxious, foul-mouthed younger brother's wedding, but we eventually see is about the relationship between Sedaris and his brother. These are wholly hilarious, and do well to offset much of the depressing downheartedness emoted from the essays mentioned above. Fans of Sedaris will certainly appreciate this collection of essays. Newbies may find his life and family a bit too bizarre to digest at first, but after pushing through will realize the palette of emotions mentioned earlier. After all, while Sedaris' life is strange and usually utterly absurd, it is still life nonetheless.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jesi

    So, I got about 7% into the book Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim before just not being able to listen to it anymore. It, quite literally, was making me sick to listen to it. The main characters are shallow, "broken," and... well, the stuff of sitcom characters. They're (to me) sick, but "normal" which was making my head explode. I suppose, in a way, you could say that the book was "dark humor," which is pretty hit or miss to me. The family really could have been spawned for Married With C So, I got about 7% into the book Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim before just not being able to listen to it anymore. It, quite literally, was making me sick to listen to it. The main characters are shallow, "broken," and... well, the stuff of sitcom characters. They're (to me) sick, but "normal" which was making my head explode. I suppose, in a way, you could say that the book was "dark humor," which is pretty hit or miss to me. The family really could have been spawned for Married With Children in the 70's. The mother was an alcoholic, the father was an uninterested has-been-Golden Boy who's now completely useless and disrespected by his family (maybe deservedly so, as he's the kind to offer up "promises" like "maybe we should take a cruise to the Greek Isles" and never living up to them.) And, that's only the beginning. The rest of the family is just as "bad." Now, I realize that for a stereotype, this is the "normal American family," but... does this mean that we should accept it as so? Maybe that's the point of this book - to make us look at what's taken for granted as "normal" and have it be a wake up call. Maybe, where the funny lies in this "humor" is what Valentine Michael Smith would say "it hurts too much to cry about, so we laugh." I don't want to cry about society. And, I can't honestly laugh at this, because it's too true. So, instead, I get this sick feeling - like looking at some car wreck. A car wreck that others think is funny. It just makes me wonder... am I broken, or is the rest of society?

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

    Sedaris non fa per me. Mi aspettavo storie esilaranti, non le ho trovate. Mi aspettavo almeno episodi divertenti, ma ho riso poco o niente. Sono raccolti in questo libro episodi dell’adolescenza dello scrittore ed altri dell’età adulta, incentrati soprattutto sui rapporti familiari con il padre, la madre e gli strampalati fratelli; storie che alla fine hanno una morale sottesa, ma che non hanno suscitato in me il benché minimo interesse. Dice Sedaris in un’intervista: "Molti grandi romanzi americ Sedaris non fa per me. Mi aspettavo storie esilaranti, non le ho trovate. Mi aspettavo almeno episodi divertenti, ma ho riso poco o niente. Sono raccolti in questo libro episodi dell’adolescenza dello scrittore ed altri dell’età adulta, incentrati soprattutto sui rapporti familiari con il padre, la madre e gli strampalati fratelli; storie che alla fine hanno una morale sottesa, ma che non hanno suscitato in me il benché minimo interesse. Dice Sedaris in un’intervista: "Molti grandi romanzi americani degli ultimi anni - libri che amo, come Le correzioni di Jonathan Franzen - ruotano intorno alla famiglia, possibilmente una pessima famiglia. Per descriverla è stato coniato un aggettivo, "disfunzionale". Una parola che fino a quindici anni fa neanche esisteva. Serve a indicare la quantità di sofferenza che ci si può procurare vivendo insieme. Ma la mia famiglia non è disfunzionale, la mia famiglia funziona ed è per questo che continuo a parlarne. È complicata ma piena di risorse". Sono contenta per lui, gli auguro di continuare ad avere successo con i libri che parlano della sua famiglia; dal canto mio penso proprio di aver chiuso con Sedaris.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Bunn

    I couldn't finish this book. I think I read about a third of it and then got fed up. Sedaris is a good writer, don't get me wrong. In fact, he's a very good writer. However, Corduroy and Denim is just a series of narcissistic vignettes. I don't enjoy that sort of thing. Keep your therapy private. I would've kept on reading if Sedaris was funny, but he isn't, despite his reputation for humor. How on earth is he supposed to be funny? I have fairly eclectic taste in humor (Woody Allen, Wodehouse, A I couldn't finish this book. I think I read about a third of it and then got fed up. Sedaris is a good writer, don't get me wrong. In fact, he's a very good writer. However, Corduroy and Denim is just a series of narcissistic vignettes. I don't enjoy that sort of thing. Keep your therapy private. I would've kept on reading if Sedaris was funny, but he isn't, despite his reputation for humor. How on earth is he supposed to be funny? I have fairly eclectic taste in humor (Woody Allen, Wodehouse, Amis, Pinkwater, Richard Powell, Robert Taylor...on down to old Dave Barry), but I couldn't find an iota of humor in the microscope-on-the-Sedaris-Family approach. If anything, I found it all fairly dreary and way too familiar in terms of the Jewish family angst. I'll probably give some of his other books a try, but I don't have high hopes. Modern literature seems to have devolved more and more into navel-gazing psychotherapy instead of actual story. Call me old-fashioned, but I want at least a pretense of story.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    A collection of writings by David Sedaris. Quite possibly the funniest book I've ever read. (There's a little language and stuff, so I don't recommend reading it out loud to the kids. But I guarantee you will laugh out loud to anyone sitting near you. Which means don't read it on a crowded airplane.)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    ***NO SPOILERS*** (Full disclosure: book abandoned at page 211 [out of 257 pages].) I’d had this book on my to-read list for too long and finally decided to read it after Sedaris made me laugh in the documentary “Do I Sound Gay?” As of this writing, this book has an impressive average rating of 4.08 here on Goodreads, so I had high expectations; unfortunately, I can’t join the David Sedaris fan club. Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim isn’t so much a memoir as it is a series of humorous anecd ***NO SPOILERS*** (Full disclosure: book abandoned at page 211 [out of 257 pages].) I’d had this book on my to-read list for too long and finally decided to read it after Sedaris made me laugh in the documentary “Do I Sound Gay?” As of this writing, this book has an impressive average rating of 4.08 here on Goodreads, so I had high expectations; unfortunately, I can’t join the David Sedaris fan club. Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim isn’t so much a memoir as it is a series of humorous anecdotes from Sedaris’s childhood that he randomly strung together, and by “randomly,” I mean he didn’t put these in any kind of order. It would make the most sense to order them chronologically--unless there’s some reason not to do this, such as a unifying theme (e.g., a Halloween anecdote from when he was eight and one from when he was eighteen), but this isn’t the case. The anecdotes jump all over the place and are various degrees of humorous, but, it should be noted, are never laugh-out-loud hilarious. Actually, some are flat-out strange, such as one I found disrespectful in which Sedaris visits the Anne Frank house in Amsterdam and daydreams about redesigning it, knocking down a wall here and there, redecorating it in this way and that. Sedaris had--and continues to have--kooky life experiences and also is able to find humor in the everyday, but what’s interesting is that what’s funny isn’t about him; it’s about other people. It’s probably more accurate, then, to say he has kooky life encounters, not experiences. In the opening story, the humor comes almost entirely from his unconventional neighbors. In another story, in which Sedaris recounts working as a house cleaner, the humor comes from the man whose house he cleans. Sedaris himself does nothing funny; it’s the client who’s funny. Yet another story details just how wacky his sister is. Sedaris is like the sensible fly on the wall, observing everything, amused and aghast in almost equal measure. Ultimately, I just had to abandon this. To my great surprise I found I didn’t look forward to reading it and felt my brain turning to mush the more I read what I judge to be writing on about the fourth-grade level. Memoirists and humor writers aren’t expected to write in a sophisticated manner, but on the other hand, why not? It can’t hurt. Final verdict: An easy read but not as funny as it thinks it is. Skip.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Parsons

    I enjoyed this collection of stories from Sedaris even more than his earlier Me Talk Pretty One Day. Reading this on public transport was probably not a good idea, however, particularly in the social-starved London capital where I live, as many times reading I burst out laughing loudly, and then sniggered uncontrollably when I tried to keep the volume down. Many of the stories are not only extremely funny but also personally very relatable - in particular Sedaris' explaining of his OCD tallied s I enjoyed this collection of stories from Sedaris even more than his earlier Me Talk Pretty One Day. Reading this on public transport was probably not a good idea, however, particularly in the social-starved London capital where I live, as many times reading I burst out laughing loudly, and then sniggered uncontrollably when I tried to keep the volume down. Many of the stories are not only extremely funny but also personally very relatable - in particular Sedaris' explaining of his OCD tallied so much with my own life (particularly my teenage years) that I was filled with joy at the realisation that it isn't unique to my bizarre personality. In terms of poignancy and attention to detail I still feel that Augusten Burroughs has the slight edge, though in truth their writing styles are so different the comparison is hardly fair. In any case, I've now definitely found a new author that I love and have to now read *everything* Sedaris has in print. Joyous.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lily

    Not my cup of tea, at least not as an audiobook. I'm surprised, because Me Talk Pretty One Day was one of the funniest books I've read. (I sometimes still cheer myself up with the thought of what happens when you try to learn French from tabloid headlines.) In the ~40% of Dress Your Family that I read, I don't think I got past an obligatory chuckle. It might have something to do with the narration, which is performed by Sedaris himself. There's deadpan, and there's indifference, and my (most lik Not my cup of tea, at least not as an audiobook. I'm surprised, because Me Talk Pretty One Day was one of the funniest books I've read. (I sometimes still cheer myself up with the thought of what happens when you try to learn French from tabloid headlines.) In the ~40% of Dress Your Family that I read, I don't think I got past an obligatory chuckle. It might have something to do with the narration, which is performed by Sedaris himself. There's deadpan, and there's indifference, and my (most likely inaccurate) impression was that his way of speaking leaned more towards the latter. It unfortunately rubbed off on my feelings towards the book. Surprisingly, if I imagined the words printed on a page, they seemed slightly more humorous. Maybe a sign that if I try this book again, or other of his works, it should be in print form. I still think he's pretty good at telling a story and building up images of the absurd.

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