Cart

Las cuatro después de medianoche (Las cuatro despúes de la media noche, #2) PDF, ePub eBook


Hot Best Seller
Title: Las cuatro después de medianoche (Las cuatro despúes de la media noche, #2)
Author: Stephen King
Publisher: Published by DEBOLS!LLO (first published October 1990)
ISBN: 9786074299205
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

13321129-las-cuatro-despu-s-de-medianoche.pdf

In order to read or download eBook, you need to create FREE account.
eBook available in PDF, ePub, MOBI and Kindle versions


reward
How to download?
FREE registration for 1 month TRIAL Account.
DOWNLOAD as many books as you like (Personal use).
CANCEL the membership at ANY TIME if not satisfied.
Join Over 150.000 Happy Readers.


Las cuatro después de la medianoche (Four Past Midnight en su versión original) es el título del cuarto libro recopilatorio de historias cortas, publicado por el escritor de terror estadounidense Stephen King en el año de 1990.

30 review for Las cuatro después de medianoche (Las cuatro despúes de la media noche, #2)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Luca Ambrosino

    English (Four Past Midnight) / Italiano Four short novels (not so short, actually) of one of the best contemporary writers out there. The Langoliers (my favorite) carries the reader together with the protagonists into a parallel dimension. The unknown and the fear of what we do not know are the main themes, and the atmosphere resembles that of "The Twilight Zone", the acclaimed TV show. One of the best story I ever read. Secret Window, Secret Garden talks about what I suppose is the nightmare of English (Four Past Midnight) / Italiano Four short novels (not so short, actually) of one of the best contemporary writers out there. The Langoliers (my favorite) carries the reader together with the protagonists into a parallel dimension. The unknown and the fear of what we do not know are the main themes, and the atmosphere resembles that of "The Twilight Zone", the acclaimed TV show. One of the best story I ever read. Secret Window, Secret Garden talks about what I suppose is the nightmare of every writer, ie being accused of plagiarism. The Library policeman is the story of an adult experiencing once again a trauma occurred when he was a kid. In The Sun Dog a boy gets a camera out of the ordinary.Four past midnight... and you will not sleep anymore.Vote: 8,5 Quattro lunghi racconti di uno dei migliori romanzieri contemporanei in circolazione. I Langolieri (il mio preferito dei quattro), trasporta il lettore, assieme ai protagonisti, in una dimensione parallela. L’ignoto e la paura per ciò che non conosciamo sono il tema principale, e l’atmosfera che si respira ricorda molto quella de “Ai Confini della Realtà”, la fortunata TV serie cult. Uno dei migliori racconti che io abbia letto. Finestra Segreta, Giardino Segreto parla di quello che immagino sia l’incubo di ogni scrittore, ossia essere accusato di plagio. Il Poliziotto della Biblioteca racconta della vicenda di un adulto che rivive un trauma avvenuto quando era un ragazzino. Ne Il Fotocane, un ragazzo riceve in dono una macchina fotografica fuori dal normale.Quattro dopo mezzanotte... e non dormirete più.Voto: 8,5

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    A re-read after more than twenty years. Will it stand up? Short answer: Absolutely. :) The Langoliers fits snugly in the New Weird category, pretty much entirely esoteric SF with gremlin-types, alternate dimenions and/or time travel on a plane... There are no snakes here! :) The characters are a blast and we've got a firm horror vibe going on here where we are kept guessing as to who among all these random sleepers will make it to the end. Thoroughly enjoyable novella, but not my favorite. It's pr A re-read after more than twenty years. Will it stand up? Short answer: Absolutely. :) The Langoliers fits snugly in the New Weird category, pretty much entirely esoteric SF with gremlin-types, alternate dimenions and/or time travel on a plane... There are no snakes here! :) The characters are a blast and we've got a firm horror vibe going on here where we are kept guessing as to who among all these random sleepers will make it to the end. Thoroughly enjoyable novella, but not my favorite. It's probably best that it was relegated to a TV movie. :) My favorite is a toss up between Secret Window, Secret Garden, and The Library Police. First, though, Secret Window, Secret Garden, which only slightly resembles the movie with Johnny Depp, or at least more or less. :) This one was pretty fantastic for the writing insights, the plagiarism scare, the descent into paranoia, and the general ultimate break from reality. What's better than a writer being driven completely crazy by a story and/or a man with a definite grudge over a story? No spoilers, but so many wonderful twists happen, couldn't help but fall in love all over again. And then there's The Library Police, which is a wonderful twist on early childhood nightmares, a diatribe on fear, Red Licorice, and a cool twist on vampirism. It was definitely probably the most effective and convoluted of all the novellas in this book, I think, and also the most scarily fantastic, diving into some of the most weird and eerie escapades, even outdoing Secret Window, Secret Garden on several levels, but maybe not as much for the MC. The last novella, The Sun Dog, is classic SK not only for setting dropping and character dropping, but also in the twist he's known for... turning everyday objects into a nightmare of continuing and evolving proportions, driving all those involved into a deeper and deeper despair and fear. :) Does SK have a think about mad dogs? Even Cujo was referenced here. But the dog in the photograph has got to be even better in this novella. It's absolutely more elusive and menacing, giving up on immediate danger and far-off menace for a much more paranormal and evil menace that gave me, at least, a more pervasive and ongoing fear. It also happened to be my least favorite of the bunch, but it was still effective. :) The middle two were plainly amazing, though. :)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Edward Lorn

    The overall theme of this collection, whether Stephen King realizes it or not, is that lazy little sin we call sloth. If you're a no-account layabout, the Langoliers will come and eat you up. If you're too lazy to write your own material, John Shooter might come calling. Can't be bother to take back that library book? Here comes the Library Policeman to suck you dry. And if you wanna make a fortune not by working but by profiting off other people's misfortune, the Sun dog might make you a Scooby The overall theme of this collection, whether Stephen King realizes it or not, is that lazy little sin we call sloth. If you're a no-account layabout, the Langoliers will come and eat you up. If you're too lazy to write your own material, John Shooter might come calling. Can't be bother to take back that library book? Here comes the Library Policeman to suck you dry. And if you wanna make a fortune not by working but by profiting off other people's misfortune, the Sun dog might make you a Scooby snack. I do have a personal favorite here, along with a personal story for each of these short novels, but I must ask your pardon, because both shall remain a mystery. Two of these books bring back memories of people whom I'd rather not name. I will be obtuse when mentioning them, perhaps not telling you even as much as their sex. Let the rumor mill run. The Langoliers - Five stars. Craig Toomy is one of King's classically flawed characters . All too often King writes about over-the-top baddies of both the supernatural and real-world variety. Where Toomy deviates from King's normal build is that you actually feel bad for him. He was a little boy raised by a tyrannical father. Then his over-protective mother stepped in. If there's a recipe to build a sociopath, I don't know a better one. The tale itself is fantastic and fantastical, with a clear theme. Seize the day, or something is liable to run away with it. Secret Window, Secret Garden - I have a very special memory attached to the movie version of this one. That memory involves activities in a movie theater. I still haven't seen the end of the film adaptation, and I don't plan to. I'd much rather remember what happened in that theater. The book itself is a kind of fraternal twin of The Dark Half. To tell you why would be to spoil the book, and I will not. Suffice it to say that Secret Window, Secret Garden will always be an important story to me and one of King's twistier tales. Five balls of gas for this one, too. The Library Policeman - This is probably my favorite horror novella from King. It's his creepiest by far, and I believe that the creature herein shares several traits with Derry's infamous dancing clown. The mystery element is handled well, and the denouement is one of King's best. Five easy stars. The Sun Dog - I was fine until I got to this story. I cannot read or speak about it without crying. The story itself is not a tear jerker (far from it), it's the emotional baggage I carry, events in my life that just happened to go down while I was reading this book for the first time. The Sun Dog is an extended prologue to Needful Things, and if you want to travel down a long and windy road, I suggest starting with The Dark Half, moving to The Sun Dog, and then finally coming to a stop at the end of Needful Things. One helluva journey, if you ask me. (I miss you, my friend. I miss you so fucking much. When these moments pass, I'm good for a while. But when that wound is reopened, I bleed. And, goddamn it, does it hurts.) All the stars. In summation: To the average reader, this collection might not seem as good as Different Seasons, but to me, it means so much more than the words on the page. And, while I sit here remembering and swiping at my eyes, I'm returned to a time best forgotten. I will always fondly remember the back row of a cinema in Montgomery, Alabama, but I will also forever wish I could have a certain friend back. So there's some pleasure with the pain, and not one without the other. Final Judgment: Who stole the Kleenex?

  4. 4 out of 5

    Leo .

    This is a great book. The Library Policeman scared the shit out of me. Thinking about that nasty man with the lisp sends a shiver down my spine!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sadegh Davoudi

    This book is consisted of 4 short stories (app. 200 pages each) and as all of King's works, the super-natural has a very important role in them. 1) The first one is called "The Langoliers" and is about a group of people who wake up in an deserted plane. Your in an unknown world where you don't know the rules. Fascinating. (I give it 4/5) 2) The second one is called "Secret Window, Secret Garden". I found this story somehow boring. It's about a writer which someone accuses him of stealing his stor This book is consisted of 4 short stories (app. 200 pages each) and as all of King's works, the super-natural has a very important role in them. 1) The first one is called "The Langoliers" and is about a group of people who wake up in an deserted plane. Your in an unknown world where you don't know the rules. Fascinating. (I give it 4/5) 2) The second one is called "Secret Window, Secret Garden". I found this story somehow boring. It's about a writer which someone accuses him of stealing his story. (I'd give it 2/5) 3) The third story is called "The Library Policeman". This was a story I couldn't put down. The writing was magnificent. As the years go by, I find it harder to find books which you can't stop reading. It's about a guy who borrows two books from the town library but fails to return them on time and the librarian sends the library police to him. (I give this one 5/5) 4) The last but not least, is a story called "The Sun Dog". I can clearly say, this is by far the scariest story I've read. King has put in some very detailed paragraphs which gives you the goosebumps all over you. This is a story which I'm ashamed to say, gave me a nightmare. It's about a camera that takes pictures of some unknown place.(5/5 is my opinion) At the end, my average grade is 4/5 for this book

  6. 4 out of 5

    Silod

    Four Past Midnight is a collection containing the following "short" stories: 1. The Langoliers (233 pages) 2. Secret Window, Secret Garden (146 pages) 3. The Library Policeman (195 pages) 4. The Sun Dog (149 pages) Generally speaking, Stephen King begins with amazing concepts that are soon dragged down by poor execution. To make it more fun, look for the following the next time you read a King novel and see how many you can find: - FLAT, IMPARTIAL TONE. Whether he is describing the main character's mo Four Past Midnight is a collection containing the following "short" stories: 1. The Langoliers (233 pages) 2. Secret Window, Secret Garden (146 pages) 3. The Library Policeman (195 pages) 4. The Sun Dog (149 pages) Generally speaking, Stephen King begins with amazing concepts that are soon dragged down by poor execution. To make it more fun, look for the following the next time you read a King novel and see how many you can find: - FLAT, IMPARTIAL TONE. Whether he is describing the main character's morning routine or the final climactic moment where he or she is on the verge of death, battling a fierce supernatural creature, King just takes it all down like a courtroom stenographer. He sprinkles in some flashy similes, occasional pop culture references and, rarely, a few words of truly good writing, but these bits and pieces stand out against a bland background. It is easy to picture him coming up with one such gem suddenly in the shower, at the only moment when he isn't actually trying, and racing across the house, naked and soapy, to jot it down before he can forget it again. - REDUNDANCY. After rinsing and drying off, King lovingly coddles his favourite inventions. He uses and reuses words, phrases, references, and concepts among his books and there's nothing wrong with that, per se, but he will also use the same word or phrase multiple times in a paragraph or even in a sentence. - SELF-REFERENCE. It might not happen in every story, but King tends to reference his own works a fair bit. You can decide for yourself whether this is actually witty or just egotistical. - UNREALISTIC DIALOGUE. Spoken ideas are not constructed the same way as ideas that are written down... unless you're a character in a King novel. King's character dialogue is more or less just like the surrounding narration, which makes his characters sound scripted. - STORY ABOUT A WRITER. King's books are almost always about authors. If the main character is not an author, another significant character will be. - UNECESSARY MONSTERS. King loves to invent monsters for his stories, but they aren't usually necessary. It is much more thrilling to imagine familiar creatures and objects acting strangely or violently than it is to watch monsters, which one would naturally expect to behave that way. It is also disruptive because King's monsters tend to be complex, sparsely-described, and in a constant state of metamorphosis, making it extremely difficult to form a mental image of them. - KNOWLEDGE WITH NO LOGICAL SOURCE. Rather than take the time to construct a path for the characters to obtain knowledge in a reasonable way, King relies almost completely on intuition and gut feelings, psychic connections between people, the influence of supernatural objects or beings, and tremendous leaps in logic. - DEUS EX MACHINA. When it looks like all the character's problems are about to be over, but you're only halfway through the book's length, hold on to your pants - a supernatural force is about to seize control and knock the story back on track. On the other side of the coin, if it all looks hopeless for the characters, then someone is probably about to win the battle by spontaneously obtaining knowledge, as mentioned before. - RAPID AGING. Being a character in a story falling under the genre of thriller or horror is understandably stressful, but King's characters take it especially hard. Watch for characters whose hair turns white or grey overnight or who otherwise display outward signs of having had several years taken off of their lives during the course of the story due to trauma. [WARNING: THE REST OF THIS REVIEW CONTAINS SPOILERS.] _______________________________________________________________________ The following reviews contain examples of the above listed, spoilers, and a fair bit of bashing. _______________________________________________________________________ THE LANGOLIERS: The writer in The Langoliers is Jenkins and he is also the main character gaining knowledge with no logical source. Jenkins explains just about every aspect of the characters' situation with theories based on his experience in writing mystery novels. Fact and fiction collide every time he opens his mouth but, for the most part, the other characters buy right into it. The only thing more maddening than their incredible suspension of disbelief is how Jenkins always manages to be right, even though most of his ideas seem to come from nowhere and can hardly be justified by the "I've written a lot of stories" excuse. Dinah also knows too much, coming to a variety of her own conclusions using intuition or by spontaneously gaining knowledge. She can also hear the langoliers long before anyone else can, can look through other people's eyes, and appears as an apparition because, in this story universe, being blind apparently gives you superpowers. Overall, it is difficult to take The Langoliers seriously. The dialogue isn't bad, for a King novel, but the character relationships, the plotline, and the actual premise of the story are heavily contrived. The story generally lacks substance and contains two especially painful bits. The first is that Albert has an imaginary alter-ego - Ace Kaussner, the fastest Jew west of the Mississippi. This could have been cute if the character were a little kid with a vivid imagination, but why is a seventeen-year-old, college-bound individual who is sound of mind and described as being "fiercely bright" wandering around leaking out so much cheese? The second is a bit of stumbling prolongation: after successfully passing through the rip in space-time, one would expect the characters to find themselves back in the normal world. Instead, King forces the suspense to pointlessly continue several more pages with the justification that time somehow hasn't caught up with the characters yet. It is as if King could tell the story was lacking something and was afraid to end it, but didn't know how to fix the problem. The langoliers, themselves, are King's typical difficult-to-imagine, vicious-without-a-cause critters. Their nature is largely explained by the only character in the story who isn't of sound mind. They aren't terribly impressive to read about and the story would probably have been better without them. SECRET WINDOW, SECRET GARDEN: Secret Window, Secret Garden was easily the best story in this collection. Perhaps it was only a fluke, but King managed to compose a story that was thrilling without involving a steaming pile of surreal fantasy and bad logic. The writing was very tight. Every aspect of the story is explained, though the reader still must suffer a minor touch of deus ex machina: just as Mort is about to kill Amy, Evans seems to appear out of nowhere to rescue her. His reasons for being there are later explained, but it is still a bit thin, especially when you consider that he made himself known at the last possible second and not before, allowing Mort to do some serious damage. This point aside, King ties up all the loose ends quite nicely. The main character is still a writer, but the characters aren't bad, the dialogue could be worse, and there is an utter lack of poorly-constructed monsters. Secret Window, Secret Garden was actually a good story, though King was one-upped by the movie version, which had a much-improved ending - it made more sense, it was cleaner, it cut out the dull epilogue, and it was both creepier and more memorable. THE LIBRARY POLICEMAN: Sam is the writer in this story - the reason he visits the library in the first place is to check out some books to help him compose a speech. Fortunately, the speech is not included in the story, which is dull enough on its own. The real meat of it is contained in the forty pages or so that Dave spends explaining everything. Even though he was apparently completely sotted the entire time he was interacting with Ardelia and even though his knowledge of what she really was is extremely limited, Dave manages to give a very detailed account of his dealings with her and is absolutely certain of what's going to happen next. After Dave is finished pulling (correct) explanations out of his hat, Sam defeats the monster, relying entirely on intuition. His method and its origins are completely outlandish, but the best idea to defeat a monster in a King novel is apparently to just have no idea what you're doing while you're doing it. Basically everything surrounding Dave's story and Sam's face-off with the monster is filler. In addition to being difficult to form a mental image of, the monster turns out to be a pretty big let-down, since the creature receives a very great deal of build-up for how brief the final battle is and how little it manages to fight back. This story probably would have been better if King had invested more in the library policeman and the idea that it could be a real being and less in Ardelia. These were really creatures of two different stories who somehow got thrown in together to fight over the spotlight. THE SUN DOG: The Sun Dog starts off as being downright chilling, but starts to go downhill when the dog in the photographs begins morphing unnecessarily into yet another poorly-described monster. The dog monster's origins and motivations remain completely unexplored throughout the course of the story and this is no great loss, but the final show-down between Kevin and the monster is awkward, at best. Rather than having the dog lunge spectacularly out of an image, King dives into a bizarre metaphor for child labor. In the process, he melts a camera, kills a man in an indeterminate way, and stretches the size of a photograph far beyond the limits of the reasonable. Kevin defeats the monster thanks to a little dose of sourceless knowledge - after a series of nightmares, he knows that Pops still has the camera. He doesn't have a hunch or want to check to soothe his nerves, he just KNOWS, even though he destroyed the camera, himself. After finding that Pops does, indeed, still have the camera in his possession, Kevin knows exactly how to defeat the dog monster with no explanation at all. The predictable ending to this story was for Kevin to take a picture of the dog monster to return it to the Polaroid world and then destroy the camera. For once, it was a let-down to see a story behave unpredictably. When Kevin takes the monster's picture, it randomly turns to stone and then falls back through the photograph it was born of, which smolders dramatically away into nothing. Father and son share a mushy moment of poor dialogue and then we get a painful epilogue in which a completely unrelated electronic device threatens Kevin, telling him that the dog monster is alive and well and angry. Wow.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    The Langoliers: Twilight Zone type scenario, only more horrific. Not for those with a fear of flying, or you don't have aerophobia, you may well develop it after reading this. That,and a perfectly logical fear of toothy existence-devouring beasties! Secret Window, Secret Garden: Having already seen and enjoyed the film adaptation, I wasn't sure what to expect from the original novel. I found the story to be more intense and claustrophobic, one of those rare tales that stays with you and gets unde The Langoliers: Twilight Zone type scenario, only more horrific. Not for those with a fear of flying, or you don't have aerophobia, you may well develop it after reading this. That,and a perfectly logical fear of toothy existence-devouring beasties! Secret Window, Secret Garden: Having already seen and enjoyed the film adaptation, I wasn't sure what to expect from the original novel. I found the story to be more intense and claustrophobic, one of those rare tales that stays with you and gets under your skin; you ARE poor Mort, slowly but surely losing his marbles as his grip on reality loosens. Think I may have preferred the film ending though, that was (unusually for Hollywood) somewhat darker. The Library Policeman: I have a feeling this will be my favourite story in this collection! Not so much about the scare-potential of libraries and librarians (though I can see how both can be quite creepy), and more about the deepest childhood fears we all have. That said, the way Ardelia Lortz draws on these fears is BLOODY SCARY! And remember kids, renew or return your books in good time, or the Library Policeman just might pay you a visit! The Sun Dog: Cameras are sort of strange. Even when you know the technology behind it, the idea that a moment, a place, a person can be frozen in time is still almost other-worldly (if you ponder such things for long enough, I guess). But what if this wondrous creation turns against you, manipulates you and tries to take on a life of its own? And what if the malevolent creature within is a monstrous dog-beast? A select few residents of a small town find out. And I never was much of a 'dog person', anyway ... Overall, a great collection. My personal favourite was The Library Policeman.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kit★

    This is yet another re-read for me, and oh, I'd say it's been at least 8 or 9 years since I've read it, but I remember liking it a lot back then, my friend had a copy and I didn't, I had dark thoughts of booknapping and possible ransom. Happily, I have my own copy nowadays to read whenever I please. I don't know why it's taken me so long to re-read this book, but I'm glad it's been patiently waiting for me. So far: "The Langoliers" was excellent. SK does the "small-group of survivors coping with a This is yet another re-read for me, and oh, I'd say it's been at least 8 or 9 years since I've read it, but I remember liking it a lot back then, my friend had a copy and I didn't, I had dark thoughts of booknapping and possible ransom. Happily, I have my own copy nowadays to read whenever I please. I don't know why it's taken me so long to re-read this book, but I'm glad it's been patiently waiting for me. So far: "The Langoliers" was excellent. SK does the "small-group of survivors coping with and end-of-the-world sort of scenario" so well, they are among my favorite of stories. This group was great, I immediately fell for Nick, the tough British agent with the take-charge manner and good looks. I also really liked Albert "Ace" Kaussner, he was funny and yet I had the sense that he was stronger than he seemed. Even Mr. Toomy, the insights into his background were fascinating, seeing into why he is the way he is. And of course, Dinah, her ability to see so well into her surroundings and insights into people, all while being blind, she was a great character. I always like reading about deserted locations, world without people, and when they got to the Bangor Airport, at first, I was like, all right, no one's around, but you got this big whole place to take over, you're safe. But, of course nobody's safe, that'd be silly! As they tried to figure out what was going on, the fact that the world they had entered was "expired" and dead, useless, like a husk, I have to say that I do not like that theory about time-travel, lol, it's always been a dream to travel back in time and experience the people and places and things of the past, I would be sorely disappointed to go back to that! Then add in the craziness of the langoliers and Toomy doing his thing, my heart was pumping, I couldn't put the book down. Then, they get away, but will they be ok? The ending was actually rather happy though, and I liked it. I sort of want to see the movie now, but I know it definitely won't live up to my imagination. "Secret Window, Secret Garden" I'm saving this one for last, because I'm going to read along to the audio I found at the library booksale: Secret Window, Secret Garden: Two Past Midnight, and partially because I love the movie and have watched it many times. Now if only I could find a cassette player! "The Library Policeman" was the one that stuck out in my mind from my past reading the most, most likely due to what happened to Sam as a child. But I didn't remember the details of the story, and the details are what makes the story. As the story opens, Sam is just an average small-town guy, insurance salesman/realtor, friendly with most people in town, but with no real deep connections. However, as the strange things start to add up, and uncomfortable memories try to surface, Sam grows stronger. I liked the atmosphere as he walked into the library the first time, I could picture the gloomy, old-fashioned place, the spookiness of being alone in the stacks. Ardelia Lortz was an excellent baddy, like the wolf wearing the sweet looking grandma as a disguise, I was creeped out by her before even knowing what she was. When Sam lost his books, and was rushing trying to find them, and trying to find out about Ardelia, I was rushing right along with him, knowing something bad was going to happen if he didn't find those books. Once Sam told the truth to Naomi and Dave, and they joined in as bigger parts in the story, it really got rolling. I enjoyed Dave's backstory about Ardelia, it gave him much more depth, and I liked finally hearing about what it was that Ardelia had done, because I had been just as baffled as Sam when he tried asking what the deal was with everyone freaking out when they heard her name. The last quarter of the story flew by, and when Sam finally unlocked the memory from his childhood that had been buried for so long, I felt relief, like now he could go on and do battle. What happened to him was terrible, and I was so glad he could defeat his demon and emerge stronger and better for it. This story was more than just another spook tale, it was about the things people keep locked away in their memories, and the power those memories can hold. "The Sun Dog" I vaguely remember used to be my favorite in the collection, and I still think it's a great, entertaining story. It was cool going back to Castle Rock, and Pop Merill was a great character, lol, full of character. I could picture his junk shop perfectly. I was intrigued by the idea of the camera, what world was it taking pictures of, and why? And what exactly was the dog? I wanted to know more. Then, there was a part, where Kevin was dreaming, he dreamt that (view spoiler)[he was in Oatley, wearing a backpack, asking an old man with a shopping cart if there was anywhere hiring, and the old man started shouting, "fushing feef!". Kevin was somehow seeing/dreaming about something that happened to Jack Sawyer in The Talisman. (hide spoiler)] I had to smile. Even if it meant nothing really in the big scheme of things in the DT universe, it still brought me joy seeing that little part. The end was a bit rushed I thought, but it did serve to make me rush a little, blood pressure was up and I was reading faster than normal, like I had to hurry b/c something bad was going to happen. The dog will be back though, and the epilogue of the story sort of reminded me of the ending of a scary movie with 6 sequels, but it was alright. There was some hinting of more things to come in Castle Rock, which I'm guessing is detailed Needful Things: The Last Castle Rock Story if I remember correctly. That's another one that's on the 'need to re-read b/c it's been a few years' list. All in all, another great collection by my favorite author. I liked the introductions to each story, I always like it when "Uncle Stevie" writes his extras, it's like getting to know the stories and the author better, and ya gotta like the conversational tone of those writings, forewords, afterwords, intros, what have you.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cody | codysbookshelf

    There is an old Family Guy cutaway which depicts Stephen King meeting with his publisher to pitch his next novel. Obviously desperate for an idea, King quickly looks around the office and grabs the publisher's desk lamp. "So this family gets attacked by . . . a lamp monster! Ooooh!" he waves his hands, trying to convey the scariness and shock of his laughably bad offering. Of course the skit is satirizing King's prolificacy. The publisher sighs, defeated, and asks when he can have the manuscript There is an old Family Guy cutaway which depicts Stephen King meeting with his publisher to pitch his next novel. Obviously desperate for an idea, King quickly looks around the office and grabs the publisher's desk lamp. "So this family gets attacked by . . . a lamp monster! Ooooh!" he waves his hands, trying to convey the scariness and shock of his laughably bad offering. Of course the skit is satirizing King's prolificacy. The publisher sighs, defeated, and asks when he can have the manuscript. Four Past Midnight feels a little like that. None of these stories quite plummet to the lows of an evil, murderous lamp come to life . . . but this is not King on his A-game. These stories were written in the late '80s, when SK was getting off alcohol and drugs; that can have a huge impact on a person's life — especially a person who has to live up to the expectations of millions. King once said of this time period that everything he wrote "fell apart like wet tissue paper," and that self-consciousness and unease is very evident here. The writing is clunky and oft-uninspired; few of the characters come alive. The excellent characterization is why I pay the price of admission. Even if the story gets bloated and the ending disappoints, King's characters are typically reliable. Not so here. In essence, it feels like King studied what worked best earlier in his career and incorporated those elements into the novellas, with diminished results. We have the small band of survivors fighting for life against an apocalyptic setting a'la The Stand and The Mist (The Langoliers), a psychic child (again, The Langoliers), the tortured writer (Secret Window, Secret Garden), repressed childhood memories/using the innocence of childhood to fight a shape-shifting monster (The Library Policeman) and a boring-as-shit Castle Rock tale about a murderous dog (The Sun Dog). All of these stories feel like they're stuck in tired, been-there-done-that territory; I almost never accuse King of repeating himself, but this collection is nothing but reheated leftovers of plot points from earlier, better novels and novellas. My ratings for each story are as follows: The Langoliers: 3 Secret Window, Secret Garden: 4 The Library Policeman: 3 The Sun Dog: 1 That puts the average at 2.75, which rounds up to 3. This is a totally average book. Secret Window, Secret Garden is easily the best of the lot; I don't care to ever reread the others. King Connections The Langoliers features a shout-out to The Shop. Secret Window, Secret Garden partially takes place in Derry; The Sun Dog takes place in Castle Rock. Both towns are, of course, very important to the King universe. Favorite Quote “'I'm not taking that,' Mort said, and part of him was marvelling at what a really accommodating beast a man was: when someone held something out to you, your first instinct was to take it. No matter if it was a check for a thousand dollars or a stick of dynamite with a lit and fizzing fuse, your first instinct was to take it.” Up Next Needful Things

  10. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Strömquist

    Stephen King (re-)read #28. For some reason I remembered this collection less than I thought I would. And it's certainly not because it's forgettable! I did read it in Swedish the first time around and I think that this is much better in original language. Four stories, three great ones. The Langoliers was actually the greatest surprise for me, I had but a really dim remembrance of the movie that was based off this and had totally forgotten about what a great story it is. Brilliant cast of charac Stephen King (re-)read #28. For some reason I remembered this collection less than I thought I would. And it's certainly not because it's forgettable! I did read it in Swedish the first time around and I think that this is much better in original language. Four stories, three great ones. The Langoliers was actually the greatest surprise for me, I had but a really dim remembrance of the movie that was based off this and had totally forgotten about what a great story it is. Brilliant cast of characters and a spellbinding mystery start. Just enough is then revealed and explained to make the story hold up all the way through. One of Kings top "long short stories"/novellas and a solid 5-star read! Secret Window, Secret Garden I do realize it's probably me, because a lot of people seem to like this one very much, but nothing in it works for me. Hot on the heels of The Dark Half (which I did not like at all) this story is so similar in theme that it's actually surprising that it was published directly following. If I never read another story of a writer and his pseudonym/alter ego/evil twin/Mr Hyde it will be all right with me. The psychiatry part of the plot has really never ever worked either, in my opinion. Stars you say? Well, I'll just say that this piece is lonely responsible for knocking the last off the total. The Library Policeman An It companion that is an absolutely brilliantly told very 80's (for me) pure horror one. Things lurk in the small town - things you don't know about your neighbors and also something much worse; fears and dangers from an earlier life merge inexplicably with a new (new to our main protagonist that is) threat. Again, just enough is explained and expanded on to make this story work all the way. Another full-star carrying my highest recommendation! The Sun Dog Is a wonderful return to Castle Rock and a great prelude to Needful Things (next up), mostly in the form of 'Pop' Merrill, trader of many things and services. As any CR story full with great references and characters. The story itself is another classical horror with a nice bit of Twilight Zone strangeness. I'd give this one a strong 4-star. So, in my view, three stories that make up one of the best collections of (kind of) short stories that I know and one that's easily skipped in my view.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nandakishore Varma

    This contains two absolutely creepy stories - "The Langoliers", about a planeload of people trapped in dead time and "The Library Policeman" about a childhood boogeyman come alive. It also contains "Secret Window, Secret Garden" - the prototype for the novel The Dark Half. An excellent collection.

  12. 5 out of 5

    F.R.

    Having read and loved 'Full Dark, No Star's' earlier this year, I was eagerly looking forward to another collection of four Stephen King novellas. Although this time I've been distinctly disappointed. I've detailed my thoughts on each individual story below, but suffice to say this really is a second string collection. The Langoliers First things first, Stephen King really can’t write an English accent. In Nick Hopewell, who is a kind of jaded, SAS-graduate James Bond, King tries to give us an En Having read and loved 'Full Dark, No Star's' earlier this year, I was eagerly looking forward to another collection of four Stephen King novellas. Although this time I've been distinctly disappointed. I've detailed my thoughts on each individual story below, but suffice to say this really is a second string collection. The Langoliers First things first, Stephen King really can’t write an English accent. In Nick Hopewell, who is a kind of jaded, SAS-graduate James Bond, King tries to give us an English accent, but really it reads much more like South African. The frequent uses of ‘bloody’, the referring to everyone as ‘matey’ just made this constant reader think a lot more of Cape town than Cambridge. Part of me thought King should have cut his losses and just write him as South African, but then no one was going to write a story in 1990 with a member of the South African security services as one of their heroes. The story itself is a kind of tribute to the ‘Airport’ movies, with a random group of disparate individuals thrown together by an awful experience on n aeroplane, but with extra horror thrown in – which makes sense as this is Stephen King rather than Arthur Hailey. But actually I felt the horror moments were jarring to the rest of the story. There was of course a big part of me – the horror fan part – who welcomed the more horrific bits, but those horrific bits are so horrific that they don’t match the tone of the rest. This stops being a tale of a band of disparate individuals finding love, friendship and companionship on a plane in serious trouble to become a full-on horror story, but then it tries to just click back into being a tale of a band of disparate individuals finding love, friendship and companionship on a plane in serious trouble, but it can’t do that anymore as those horrific moments are just too powerful. They are scarring to the story, but neither the characters nor the story itself notices this scarring, and the result is a really disjointed, ill-fitting piece of fiction. In theory the idea of Stephen King taking on an ‘aeroplane in peril’ tale makes sense. They’re supposed to be scary anyway, so it should be easy for him to ramp up the scare factor. As such I wanted to like ‘The Langoliers’, but it just didn’t work for me. Not only was the tone of it wrong, there were too many ill-defined characters and the ending just left me shaking my head in bafflement and bemusement. (view spoiler)[ Five questions for The Langoliers: 1. At the end the survivors know they’ll have to explain all this to the relevant aviation authorities, but how are they going to do this? What on Earth are they going to say? 2. When they return to normal time at LAX, there is now a plane buried into the side of the building. Why aren’t there now alarms and sirens ringing out? 3. Having visited a point of time (non-time?) beyond the end of the day when the langoliers eat the remains of the old day (a ridiculously fuzzy concept if ever there was one. Seriously, is that what happens?) are they not danger of sipping back out of normal time again when the clock strikes midnight? Yes they have come back through the time rip, but they’ve come back into non-time before the start of the day. Do the rules of normal time still apply to them? Aren’t they just going to slip back out of the day twenty-four hours from now and face the langoliers again? 4. I know it’s an ‘Airport’ movie staple for the survivors to be jubilant at the end, but after the horrific things which have happened – particularly the deaths of Nick and Dinah – isn’t it a tad inappropriate for them to be so deliriously happy? 5. Is the story really hinting at the end that Laurel and Brian will get together? Seriously, it’s only forty-five minutes since she lost her last new-found love. Allow a little grieving time, please. (hide spoiler)] Secret Window, Secret Garden Ironically for a story where a man arrives on an author’s doorstep claiming to be the actual writer of one of the author’s short stories, there would be no debate at all as to who wrote ‘Secret Window, Secret Garden’. It is unmistakably King. A story set in Maine, about writing and the scary things that happen (or might happen) to horror authors, full of home-spun dialogue and country wisdom. Who the hell else is it going to be? Certainly King does a much better job with intimate horror than an Airport movie pastiche, and for the most part this is a highly effective chiller. A psychological horror about one man’s inability to control the world around him, until it seems like reality itself is slipping away. Except I can’t help thinking that the contemporaneous ‘The Dark Half’ (King admits in himself in the introduction that the ideas were linked) did a much better job with the same material. This is an effective chiller, but if you have read ‘The Dark Half’ (or even ‘Misery’) it might strike you as an after-thought. (view spoiler)[ Hopefully I’m not going to use spoilers to comment negatively on the ending of every story in this collection, but we are two stories through and already I’m 100%. My problem with the ending here was not the twist that Mort Rainey and John Shooter are actually the same person. No, the twist is good. It’s the kind of thing that encourages repeat readings as the story, and Mort’s actions within it, make a lot more sense once you know that twist. No my problem with it is the sudden switch of perspective from Mort to his wife, Amy. After so long invested with Mort, it feels jarring and abrupt to suddenly switch perspectives. I know narratively why it’s done, but it feels emotionally like an abandonment of the central character. The end would have worked far better if the story had kept Mort’s/John Shooter’s perspective even as he/they die(s). After that we have a weirdly deathless epilogue where the investigator explains what happened. Now clearly this is based on the last scene in ‘Psycho’, but whereas to original viewers of ‘Psycho’ it would have been a welcome breather after the horror that went before, to modern audiences it looks a stilted piece of cinema. Stilted is the best description for the version here too. King tries to jazz it up with the hints of a ghost story, but even that fails to lift the excitement levels. I don’t remember much about the film, but I do remember that the ending was different – Shooter kills Amy and buries her in the secret garden before returning to the Mort personality and not remembering it. It therefore keeps the focus on Mort, loses the dull explanation and is noticeably darker. Without a doubt I prefer it. (hide spoiler)] The Library Policeman Hooray! I’m three stories in and I’ve finally found one of the quality us constant readers have come to want and expect. It’s scary, tense, actually manages to be quirkily funny and has an ending I’m not going to carp about, indeed an ending that goes to much darker places than I thought it would. (view spoiler)[Okay, the epilogue where a parasite is pulled off the heroine’s neck and wrapped in sticky liquorice is not only unnecessary, it’s unnecessarily silly. (hide spoiler)] A small-town businessman visits his local library and has a run-in with the scary librarian, a librarian who becomes even more terrifying when the man – as of course he would – manages to lose his borrowed books. If I had a wish here though it’d be that King had eschewed the supernatural element of the story and instead made it about a small-town library whose custodians are given a huge and bizarre amount of power and the placid, conformist town which lets this happen. Then we’d have a man’s desperate Kafkaesque quest to return some library books he no longer has, and no paid for replacements will do. It would have been an off-beat and original tale, and taken the author a lot further out of his comfort zone than this one does. Still, the story we have here is pretty damned entertaining. The Sun Dog I’ve always been a complete sucker for stories where things start to move in old paintings or photos, so this story of a vicious hell-hound which is advancing further and further out of the front of the frame with every photo that’s taken by a Polaroid camera, was always going to be right up my street. Without a doubt I think it’s the best story in this collection – it’s menacing, disturbing and goes to considerable lengths to tease out every ounce of terror of its premise; while in emporium owner, Pop Merrill, we have a particularly creepy and repellent character – but as is probably clear by now, I have a lot of problems with this collection, so the best story in it still comes with large reservations. I love that King is committed to really finding the terror in the central idea, but whereas it sounds great in principle, the resulting story is just too damn long and baggy. It would work much better at half the length. And that point probably runs into the second flaw: that it could do with another sweep through by an editor. Virtually every female character – not that any of them are prominent – is described as behaving like an actress at some point. It’s like King thought of that description for a certain type of fake behaviour, and then couldn’t stop himself using it again and again and again. Finally there’s the ending (what is it with stories in this collection and crap endings?) – a twist epilogue which is needless and rubbish on so many levels. So ‘The Sun Dog’ is far from perfect, but when it’s at its best this is vintage King. The section where Pop Merrill attempts to find a buyer for this bizarre Polaroid camera, packs in one of the weirdest rogue’s gallery in King’s oeuvre – with all the details picked out being odd and homespun and just brilliant. While elsewhere – and I know I’ve moaned about it being too long, so please excuse my inconsistency – but the detour from the main plot to drag out in horribly real detail the young lady shop assistant’s dread of the creepy customer is just some fantastically scary writing. Downright disturbing in a way – that no matter what the flaws of the story around it – will warm (or is it chill?) the heart of any horror fan.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dean

    These are great novellas by the master storyteller Stephen King!! Actually I read these Storys in my early twenties, and still could remember how good they are.. "Four Past Midnight" consists of four novellas: ** The Langoliers** ** Secret Window Secret Garden** ** The Library police** ** The Sun Dog** I must confess that this book counts as one of the main culprits responsible for having getting me hook on the novels by the King.. They are all of them masterfully crafted and elaborated, full of vigor a These are great novellas by the master storyteller Stephen King!! Actually I read these Storys in my early twenties, and still could remember how good they are.. "Four Past Midnight" consists of four novellas: ** The Langoliers** ** Secret Window Secret Garden** ** The Library police** ** The Sun Dog** I must confess that this book counts as one of the main culprits responsible for having getting me hook on the novels by the King.. They are all of them masterfully crafted and elaborated, full of vigor and armed with a strong grip almost electric and irresistible, pushing the reader hard and fast to follow the Storys to the very end!! All of the four novellas had my full support and recommendation, if you are in the mood for a gripping tale full of suspense and with surprisingly turns and the inexplicable behind ordinary people, events, and everyday items like a polaroid camera, then welcome and fasten tight your belt--enjoy the ride-- "The Langoliers" three stars *** The story begings introducing a bunch of people headed everyone to an adventure, and thanks the destiny coming all together and surviving a flight in a aircraft.. The characters are very good depicted and managed to touch your emotions, you feel they are almost living creatures.. All of them during the flight fell asleep, after awakening they find themselves trapped in an mysterious and dangerous world!! They have to overcame even a murderous madmen.. But the real dread which is coming to get them all, is only recognizable at the beginning with a noise which becomes louder and louder!!! "Secret Window Secret Garden" I'll give three stars *** This is my favorite story!!! Plagiarism and a thoroughly executed study of a man being push behind his breaking point, and then slowly losing his mind!!! A successful writer discovers that his wife has an affair with another man, causing a nervous breakdown an leaving him spiritually mutilated!! Particularly I did love that the events are mainly set and take place in a cabin surrounded by much nature in the woods of north America!!! "The Library Police" gets also three stars *** Trauma and sexual abuse are one of the main strings in the story!! Wrapped tightly as a supernatural tale only Stephen King can tell.. "The Sun Dog" for this one I'll give two stars** A birthday gift develops into a nightmare!! Focus on a Polaroid Camera which makes pictures of an unseen world.. Slowly but unstoppable the disaster unfolds relentlessly.. At the end of the day this story was a bit to much for me, demanding a little to much of my imagination.. Good written, but it did not convince me at all!! But seen in his entirety, this collection of Storys deserves four fat and greasy stars!!! Happy reading my goodreads friends, and thanks for reading my reviews!!! Dean;D

  14. 5 out of 5

    Antonio Rosato

    Questo lavoro di King, pubblicato per la prima volta nel 1990, entra nel novero dei suoi pochi libri che mi hanno lasciato con l'amaro in bocca. Per la verità, non si tratta di un romanzo vero e proprio, ma è solo una raccolta di quattro racconti brevi in cui lo stesso scrittore rende omaggio, diciamo così, alla sua professione ed al suo stesso estro creativo. I primi tre racconti, ad essere onesti, mi son piaciuti ma senza entusiasmarmi; il quarto ed ultimo, invece, mi ha completamente deluso t Questo lavoro di King, pubblicato per la prima volta nel 1990, entra nel novero dei suoi pochi libri che mi hanno lasciato con l'amaro in bocca. Per la verità, non si tratta di un romanzo vero e proprio, ma è solo una raccolta di quattro racconti brevi in cui lo stesso scrittore rende omaggio, diciamo così, alla sua professione ed al suo stesso estro creativo. I primi tre racconti, ad essere onesti, mi son piaciuti ma senza entusiasmarmi; il quarto ed ultimo, invece, mi ha completamente deluso tanto che stavo quasi per abbandonarne la lettura. Analizziamo brevemente i quattro racconti: 1. I Langolieri - Da un aereo che attraversa una strana anomalia temporale si salvano solo i passeggeri (tra cui un pilota non in servizio) che in quel preciso momento stavano dormendo. Tutti gli altri spariscono letteralmente nel nulla. Quando il pilota riesce a far atterrare l'aereo, i superstiti si ritrovano in un mondo completamente privo di colori, suoni, odori e qualunque forma di vita. Non tutti riusciranno ad accettare la nuova realtà ed uno in particolare impazzirà del tutto. Mentre compaiono degli strani esseri mostruosi che divorano (letteralmente) quel che resta del mondo, uno del gruppo dei superstiti, uno scrittore di romanzi di fantascienza, intuisce che per ritornare nel loro tempo dovranno compiere, con l'aereo, il tragitto inverso. Ma la domanda è scontata: visto che all'andata tutti loro stavano dormendo, a chi toccherà sacrificarsi per permettere agli altri di addormentarsi senza far precipitare l'aereo? Romanzo che, come avete potuto capire, affronta il tema della fantascienza (nello specifico, dei varchi temporali) in stile "Ai confini della realtà", una vecchia e popolare serie televisiva. 2. Finestra segreta, giardino segreto - Se nel primo racconto l'eroe è stato uno scrittore, questa volta un altro scrittore diventa il pazzo omicida di turno. Abbiamo, quindi, uno scrittore di successo che impazzisce convincendosi dell'esistenza di un uomo non meglio identificato che gli ha scopiazzato ben bene un suo vecchio romanzo, e che ora lo ricatta per avere la paternità dell'opera. Lo scrittore, alla fine, arriva ad uccidere chiunque si trovi sul suo cammino verso la follia assoluta. Di questo racconto, qualche anno fa, è stato tratto anche un bellissimo film (dal titolo Secret Window) interpretato da un ottimo Johnny Depp. Dei quattro racconti che compongono il libro, questo è il migliore in assoluto anche se, in alcuni punti, la trama ricalca un po' troppo La metà oscura, un altro libro di Stephen King uscito l'anno prima. 3. Il poliziotto della biblioteca - Con questo racconto King ritorna sul genere a lui più consono: l'horror. Un uomo si reca in una biblioteca per prendere un paio di libri e viene educatamente accolto da una strana impiegata che, in seguito, lo caccia via in malo modo ma ricordandogli di restituire i libri entro una settimana. L'uomo, invece, se ne dimentica (addirittura, smarrisce i libri) e, perciò, viene perseguitato da un omaccione che afferma di essere il poliziotto della biblioteca. A questo punto, per potersi salvare, l'uomo intuisce che deve necessariamente ritornare in quella strana biblioteca ed affrontare l'impiegata che, ovviamente, si rivelerà essere un mostro che si ciba delle paure altrui. Anche questo racconto, come il precedente, sembra ricalcare troppo fedelmente It, un altro vecchio libro di Stephen King. 4. Il fotocane - Ed ecco qui il racconto che mi ha letteralmente annoiato. Questa volta abbiamo un ragazzo che, in occasione del suo compleanno, si vede regalare dal padre una macchina fotografica Polaroid che sviluppa le foto istantanee. Ben presto i due noteranno che la macchina, indipendentemente da cosa viene inquadrato, sviluppa sempre la stessa foto: un cane che sta saltando verso l'obiettivo della macchina stessa. Alla fine il ragazzo capisce che quel cane infernale ha la rabbia e che salterà fuori dalla foto che sarà scattata per ultima. Come fermarlo visto che la stessa macchina fotografica cercherà di non farsi distruggere? Come per i due precedenti racconti anche questa volta ho notato una certa mania autocelebrativa di Stephen King: i fatti di questo racconto, in cui si parla di un mostruoso cane con la rabbia, si svolgono a Castle Rock... stessa località in cui King, nel 1981, ambientò il libro Cujo che guarda caso era, per chi non lo sapesse, un cane con la rabbia. [http://rosatoeu.blogspot.it/2016/10/r...]

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    The Langoliers - ***** Secret Window, Secret Garden - **** The Library Policeman - *** The Sun Dog - **** I always get a bookgasm when King introduces a story with a short intro on how the story came to be. Too much info? Overall - 4 stars

  16. 4 out of 5

    Carmine

    Polpettone dal Maine I langolieri ★★★★ Come una bella puntata di “Ai confini della realtà”. King gigioneggia con la materia fantascientifica per restituire una disavventura interdimensionale capace di sfumare il mistero nelle ataviche dicerie infantili; e non sfigurano nemmeno le incursioni nel sovrannaturale tanto care allo scrittore del Maine. Finestra segreta, giardino segreto ★★★★ La fobia più grande di uno scrittore, il plagio, argomento che lo stesso King ha dovuto affrontare nel rendere cont Polpettone dal Maine I langolieri ★★★★ Come una bella puntata di “Ai confini della realtà”. King gigioneggia con la materia fantascientifica per restituire una disavventura interdimensionale capace di sfumare il mistero nelle ataviche dicerie infantili; e non sfigurano nemmeno le incursioni nel sovrannaturale tanto care allo scrittore del Maine. Finestra segreta, giardino segreto ★★★★ La fobia più grande di uno scrittore, il plagio, argomento che lo stesso King ha dovuto affrontare nel rendere conto a pubblico e critica, acquisisce concretezza in una discesa psicologica che nell’ossessione e l’impossibilità di redenzione trova la propria condanna. Il lettore più scafato non viene colto certo di sorpresa, ma il mestiere di King, maestro nel costringere il lettore a fagocitare pagine in modalità che rasentano il patologico, lascia intravedere un’attenzione ai dettagli tutt’altro che ovvia o banale - tolto il colpo di coda finale, trashata ipergalattica utilizzata con maggior perizia nel racconto “L’ultimo caso di Umney”. Il poliziotto della biblioteca ★★ Accrocco posticcio di incubi infantili, sensi di colpa annegati nell’alcool e ricerca dell’innocenza perduta tramite escamotage che rasentano l’imbarazzante (palline di liquirizia e libri in ritardo da restituire). La loffia antagonista principale - rimasticatura pigra della più celeberrima entità di Derry - e il poliziotto della biblioteca, quest’ultimo protagonista di momenti scult come le giornalate in testa e l’utilizzo del suo manganello dietro i cefpugli perché “ehi, fono un poliziotto, ftai fermo che ti piace”, emettono un verdetto piuttosto impietoso: inaccettabile che un dramma di quel tipo venga affrontato con un piglio così pressapochista. Il resto della storia è un verboso affastellamento di spiegoni atomici e sbracamenti onirici, niente che valga la pena di analizzare. Insomma, trattasi dell’esempio più classico di purgona kinghiana. Il fotocane ★★★★ Additato ingiustamente come il racconto peggiore della raccolta, l'ultimo tassello si distingue per un soggetto horror gestito con semplicità e arguzia narrativa; ma è la presenza di Pop Merrill, laido proprietario di un improbabile bazar, a stemperare l'atmosfera con gradevoli incursioni nel trash tipiche dei film di serie B. Il finale telefonato è compreso nel pacchetto.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Wayne Barrett

    Actual rating; 3.5 stars A collection of four short stories: The Langoliers Secret Window, Secret Garden The Library Policeman The Sun Dog This collection doesn't quite stack up to the King quartet; Different Seasons, but it is still classic Stephen King.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Carolina

    - The library policeman 5/5⭐ - The sun dog 3.5 /5 ⭐ Alucinante libro de relatos de SK y que recomiendo muchísimo. 💪❤

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jason P

    I thoroughly enjoyed this compilation of Kings, it had the perfect cheesiness that is Sai King. I know some may not like his stuff and say that his work goes to you, not you to it, and somehow that makes his writing terrible? Sure, sure - you're just a scaredy cat who can't take the boogeyman. Admit it - go on, do it. I'll wait... Done? OK, good. Here's the low down: The Langoliers... How cheesy was this? People wake up on a a plane with the rest of the passengers gone, disappeared. All that's left I thoroughly enjoyed this compilation of Kings, it had the perfect cheesiness that is Sai King. I know some may not like his stuff and say that his work goes to you, not you to it, and somehow that makes his writing terrible? Sure, sure - you're just a scaredy cat who can't take the boogeyman. Admit it - go on, do it. I'll wait... Done? OK, good. Here's the low down: The Langoliers... How cheesy was this? People wake up on a a plane with the rest of the passengers gone, disappeared. All that's left is their personal belongings, even items that belonged...inside their bodies. I watched this movie when I was a kid and remember it being somewhat terrifying (because massive pac-mans were eating up everything in existence), now as an adult I couldn't help but laugh at it. The story itself was entertaining, you could say that it was classic King. The story alone deserves at least three stars. Secret Window/Secret Garden I'll keep this one short: I thought the story was very predictable, I could see coming a mile away. Yet another of King's works that was made into a movie, with Depp no less, and even the movie I thought was tame and very predictable. Two and half stars for this sucker. The Library Policeman I would say this was my favorite of all the stories in this collection. It just had a very intriguing plot to it, although, leave it to King to throw in a brutal rape scene. Jeez, when you're listening to this on audio it makes you want to puke your pants, which I didn't, but you can imagine....OK, maybe don't do that. A local guy making a speech at the rotary club wants to really 'wow' the crowd so he goes to the library for some help, there he meets the 'librarian'.... or is it? Cue the dramatic music!! Things go terribly wrong from there. The Sun Dog I won't say much about this one, why? Because I didn't really like it, it had no intrigue. Not for me anyway, and I liked the video game Fatal Frame, which is also about a "ghostly camera". I think I may have steam-rolled through this one, there wasn't much about it that made it memorable for me. Maybe another go around in the future, but for now that's how I feel. All in all, I enjoyed this one.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mafalda Fernandes

    update Fev. 2017 One Past Midnight: The Langoliers - 4* This was a gripping roller-coaster of emotions and actions! I couldn't put the book down, I really need to find out what would happen to the characters. Two Past Midnight: Secret Window, Secret Garden - 4* This one was the novel I was more excited to read. I was expecting to like more than I did. I'm not sure if it was the end, or something else. Three Past Midnight: The Library Policeman - 5* Can a Stephen King story have a happy ending? Seems t update Fev. 2017 One Past Midnight: The Langoliers - 4* This was a gripping roller-coaster of emotions and actions! I couldn't put the book down, I really need to find out what would happen to the characters. Two Past Midnight: Secret Window, Secret Garden - 4* This one was the novel I was more excited to read. I was expecting to like more than I did. I'm not sure if it was the end, or something else. Three Past Midnight: The Library Policeman - 5* Can a Stephen King story have a happy ending? Seems to be possible. The premise of the story is quite interesting, specially if has a kid you used to go to the library. In my case I use to go to school libraries. My local library was quite far away, and it was BIG!, and I was afraid to miss the delivery date of the book and be shamed in front of everyone, I was even afraid that something happened to the book... Fear lodges himself in the weirdest places. And fear is something Stephen King likes to play with. The existence of The Library Policemen is a very interesting premise. And besides I'm only mentioning childhood fears, the characters of the book are grownups. The main character is Sam Peebles and through the story he will have to rediscover his fear for libraries, and before the end he will have to face one of his childhood fears (and everything he did do forget about it) in order to survive The Library Policeman. Four Past Midnight: The Sun Dog 5* It's a prequel to Needful Things and also related with The Dark Half A true horror story, specially recommended if you're a fan of old Polaroids and are not afraid of dogs. Read at your own will.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Latasha

    3.5 or 3.75, I can't decide. I liked The Langoliers very much and I liked the Sun Dog. Before each story is an introduction. I stopped reading it after it spoiled Secret Garden, Secret Window. The Library Policeman was good too. I think the weakest story is this collection was Secret Garden.. but they may have been cause it was spoiled. I haven't seen any of the movie adaptations of any of these. I wouldn't say any of these are King's #1 best but they were not his worse either. I may revisit the 3.5 or 3.75, I can't decide. I liked The Langoliers very much and I liked the Sun Dog. Before each story is an introduction. I stopped reading it after it spoiled Secret Garden, Secret Window. The Library Policeman was good too. I think the weakest story is this collection was Secret Garden.. but they may have been cause it was spoiled. I haven't seen any of the movie adaptations of any of these. I wouldn't say any of these are King's #1 best but they were not his worse either. I may revisit them again someday.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Adam Light

    Five big, fat ones for this collection of four of King's best novellas. I loved it when he first released it, and it was even better these many years later. I had nearly forgotten the last two, so they were almost new reads for me. The Langoliers has always been one of my favorites.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    This was such a fun read! Each of the novellas was very interesting in its own way, but in particular I loved The Langoliers.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gorgona Grim

    Četvrta priča u okviru "Četiri iza ponoći" u najvećoj meri dodiruje neposredno zlo koje obitava u onostranom i vodi nas kroz vrtlog iščekivanja i tenzije. Na samom početku upoznajemo slavljenika, Kevina Delevana, koji je napunio petnaest godina. Za rođendan, on dobija polaroid, Sun 660. Kevin momentalno okida snimak, ali umesto članova porodice, fotografija prikazuje nešto što liči na dvorište. Pod pretpostavkom da je aparat pokvaren i sa željom da isti zadrži, umesto da ga jednostavno zameni u Četvrta priča u okviru "Četiri iza ponoći" u najvećoj meri dodiruje neposredno zlo koje obitava u onostranom i vodi nas kroz vrtlog iščekivanja i tenzije. Na samom početku upoznajemo slavljenika, Kevina Delevana, koji je napunio petnaest godina. Za rođendan, on dobija polaroid, Sun 660. Kevin momentalno okida snimak, ali umesto članova porodice, fotografija prikazuje nešto što liči na dvorište. Pod pretpostavkom da je aparat pokvaren i sa željom da isti zadrži, umesto da ga jednostavno zameni u lokalnoj prodavnici, Kevin odlazi jedinom čoveku koji bi mogao da mu pomogne - Pop Meril. spoiler: (view spoiler)[Pop Meril popravlja najrazličitije stvari, ali to za njega ne predstavlja glavni izvor prihoda. U slobodno vreme, ubira banoslovne kamate baveći se zelenašenjem, a takođe neguje još jedan luksuzan hobi - preprodavanje "ukletih" predmeta određenoj grupi ljudi koja je zainteresovana za okultne artefakte. (hide spoiler)] Malo je reći da je Meril bio više nego oduševljen kada se Kevin pojavio sa svojim polaroidom. Moram da priznam da me je najviše "kupila" demistifikacija sadržaja fotografije i domišljatost tog segmenta priče. Ujedno mi se svidela i pozadinska priča o Popu Merilu koju je Kevinu ispričao njegov otac, Džon Delevan. I u prethodnim pričama smo nailazili na poruku kako ipak najveće zlo dolazi od ljudi i njihovih postupaka, a ovde je to odlično prikazano kroz Pop Merilove postupke. Sa druge strane, zamerka jeste predvidivost raspleta, ali to svakako pripisujem sebi. Svakako, odlična priča i kao celina, "Četiri iza ponoći" je fantastična zbirka.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chester Dean

    Para mi siempre es un placer leer a Stephen King, y últimamente la editorial me ha consentido con dos de sus libros y eso me tiene loca de contenta. El primero que leí fue "Las cuatro después de medianoche" que consta de dos historias cortas, una se llama El policía de la biblioteca y el segundo El perro de la polaroid. Como buen libro de Stephen King (se nota enseguida su pasión por escribir) comienza con un mensaje del autor para sus lectores frecuentes, donde nos cuenta sobre el libro y la Para mi siempre es un placer leer a Stephen King, y últimamente la editorial me ha consentido con dos de sus libros y eso me tiene loca de contenta. El primero que leí fue "Las cuatro después de medianoche" que consta de dos historias cortas, una se llama El policía de la biblioteca y el segundo El perro de la polaroid. Como buen libro de Stephen King (se nota enseguida su pasión por escribir) comienza con un mensaje del autor para sus lectores frecuentes, donde nos cuenta sobre el libro y la inspiración detrás de éstas historias. Y como comentario extra, les comento que yo AMO cuando Stephen King se toma la molestia (casi siempre, de hecho) de contarnos el trasfondo de sus historias, de dónde se inspiró, o qué lo llevó a escribir la historia que tienes en tus manos. Es realmente un placer para mí leer ésto, me hace sentir más cercana a la historia, y aún más a King (que por si aún no queda claro, es mi autor favorito jajaja). La primera historia se llama El policía de la biblioteca, según en Estados Unidos existe la costumbre de decirle a los niños que si no devuelven los libros a la biblioteca a tiempo y en buen estado, la policía de la biblioteca iría por ellos. Personalmente nunca había escuchado nada similar en toda mi vida. Pues el cuento gira en torno a ésta historia que le cuentan a los niños para asustarlos y crearles la costumbre de cuidar los libros y ser puntuales. Sam Peebles, un agente inmobiliario necesita escribir un importante discurso que le puede conseguir varios compradores, y sigue el consejo de su secretaria de acudir a la biblioteca pública por un par de libros que le pudieran ayudar con su discurso. Ahí conoce a una viejecita que a pesar de siempre sonreír, le dejaba una sensación de intranquilidad, toda la biblioteca lo hacía sentir así. Especialmente cuando ella entre sonrisas le dice que más le vale entregar los libros a tiempo si no quiere que el policía de la biblioteca vaya por él. Fue una experiencia extraña y un tanto espeluznante, pero su discurso salió bien y los libros fueron de gran ayuda. El problema inició cuando un par de días después del plazo recibido, no había devuelto los libros y muchas coas extrañas comenzaron a sucederle. El segundo cuento, y el que más me gustó, trata sobre un adolescente que recibe como obsequio una cámara instantánea Polaroid, una que deseaba muchísimo. Con la emoción a tope reunió a su familiar para estrenarla tomándoles una fotografía, sintiéndose el rey del mundo por poseer esa cámara, sin imaginarse la impresión y decepción que sentiría al tener la imagen entre sus manos, una imagen que definitivamente no retrataba a su familia. Tal vez sus padres le estaban jugando una broma, así que tomó una fotografía más, y otra, y luego otra, pero la imagen seguía siendo la misma. El primer cuento tardó un poco en atraparme, porque la historia sobre el policía de la biblioteca, esa que supuestamente le cuentan a los niños de Estados Unidos, no fue algo popular donde yo crecí (o sea, aquí ni siquiera es una costumbre ir a la biblioteca), así que no llegué realmente a sentir una conexión con ese relato. Pero conforme avanzaba me fui adaptando a los personajes, al ambiente y a la historia. Tiene un final bizarro como muchas de las historias de King, pero al final lo disfruté. El segundo cuento en cambio tuvo un mejor inicio, me atrapó mucho más rápido, y tenía ganas de devorarme la historia para saber primero qué era lo que salían en las fotografías y segundo, saber por qué sucedía. Realmente me intrigó desde el inicio. Además que por más que avanzaba con la lectura, nunca lograba imaginarme cómo podría terminar, no le podía predecir ni un tipo de final, y eso me encanta, cuando eso sucede literalmente me devoro los libros por la mera curiosidad. Igual ésta historia es un poco más gore y gráfica que la primera, sobra que lo diga, pero "muy al estilo de Stephen King" cuando se pone intenso con la sangre. A pesar de que El perro de la Polaroid fue la historia que más me gustó, su final no me terminó de fascinar, siento que la idea que tenía King en mente podía desarrollarse y ser algo más tenebroso y macabro. Como que pudo "sacarle más jugo" con un final diferente. Pero en fin, eso tampoco dice que me haya disgustado, simplemente me hubiera gustado algo que me diera más miedo. Y pues, esas son las razones por las cuales el libro no tuvo una calificación perfecta (King casi siempre consigue una calificación perfecta conmigo), pero el amor no me ciega, y sé cuando algo no me termina de fascinar, y ésta vez no sucedió así.

  26. 4 out of 5

    seak

    This is a novel containing for completely different stories. Only Stephen King can have a collection of stories that average 200 pages a piece. Am I right? I'm taking my time with it, so I'll be reviewing one at a time for an unspecified amount of time. The Langoliers Years ago, I was flipping channels and saw a part of this movie. It happened to be the one part where they were explaining what was happening, but I'm proud to report that it did nothing to diminish the suspense of this story. At t This is a novel containing for completely different stories. Only Stephen King can have a collection of stories that average 200 pages a piece. Am I right? I'm taking my time with it, so I'll be reviewing one at a time for an unspecified amount of time. The Langoliers Years ago, I was flipping channels and saw a part of this movie. It happened to be the one part where they were explaining what was happening, but I'm proud to report that it did nothing to diminish the suspense of this story. At the same time, it's the reason I picked up this collection to begin with. While most of us probably don't need much encouragement to have anxiety while flying, King gives us a tale that takes place on a flight from LA to Boston. (767 - same model as the story) Not too long into the flight, some passengers wake up to find almost everyone gone. The first assumption is, they were drugged and the rest of the passengers were offloaded somehow...but then other things start to pop up... The characters are introduced and we find that there is a pilot, a teenage musician, a druggie, a psychotic businessman, an author (I couldn't believe it either), and more. All total, there's only 11 left on the plane. Using deduction, thanks to our author, the passengers slowly start to figure out what is going on. The first thing they have to find out is, who's flying the plane? Quickly, they start figuring things out and without giving anything away, the way King reveals each of these details is just amazing. Up to the very end, he continued to surprise me and I was having the same reactions as each of the passengers - "How did I miss that?!?!" (view spoiler)[When they're heading into the time-rip and Bob Jenkins (the author) realizes they need to be asleep. I couldn't believe I didn't think of that from the beginning (hide spoiler)] One thing I didn't get was (view spoiler)[ why did the pilot, who was warned of the Aurora Borealis never bring it up. I kept waiting for that to happen, not that it was incredibly important since it was mostly covered by Jenkins. It still didn't make sense that he never revealed what information he had. (hide spoiler)] When they say King is the master of suspense, they're not joking. Even knowing about some of the mysteries ahead of time, I was glued to this book from page one. (4/5) Secret Window, Secret Garden The Library Policeman The Sun Dog

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    The first two stories were on the boring side, mostly because I had seen the movies. The third story, The Library Policeman, was actually pretty good up until one moment that involves trigger warnings (view spoiler)[A young boy is raped and what it feels like is described... I was going to say too much but any description was too much. (hide spoiler)] . The fourth story, The Sun Dog, was the only one that I actually enjoyed out of the four.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Pritchard

    This was the book that turned me off Stephen King forever. Normally he is a great writer, if not a very original one, but the stories here are nothing more than rewritten Twilight Zone episodes and rather badly rewritten at that. Stephen King has said in an interview that he is the fast food of literature, well he certainly is the junk food of literature and Four Past Midnight is just a regurgitation of lame story plots.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Turner

    Audiobook – Narrated by - Various. I love the stories in this book but I have to say that some of the narrators didn’t do them justice and the background music drove me nuts! Secret Window, Secret Garden – Narrated by James Woods. The Sun Dog – Narrated by Tim Sample. The Library Policeman – Narrated Ken Howard. The Langoliers – Narrated by Willem Dafoe. *** Ebook: SECRET WINDOW, SECRET GARDEN – 4**** Loved it. Although I worked out what was happening early in the story it in no way detracted from my e Audiobook – Narrated by - Various. I love the stories in this book but I have to say that some of the narrators didn’t do them justice and the background music drove me nuts! Secret Window, Secret Garden – Narrated by James Woods. The Sun Dog – Narrated by Tim Sample. The Library Policeman – Narrated Ken Howard. The Langoliers – Narrated by Willem Dafoe. *** Ebook: SECRET WINDOW, SECRET GARDEN – 4**** Loved it. Although I worked out what was happening early in the story it in no way detracted from my enjoyment. SUN DOG - 4**** Loved this one also, the main reason being that it was set in Castle Rock. THE LIBRARY POLICEMAN – 4**** Loved it. Ardeilia Lortz gave me the creeps! THE LANGOLIERS – 3*** The beginning dragged a little. *** CONNECTIONS: SECRET WINDOW, SECRET GARDEN I read this story straight after finishing The Dark Half so I couldn’t help but notice that John Shooter had Mississippi plates on his car, as did George Stark’s black Toronado. Derry - Mort and Amy Rainey lived in Derry before their divorce. Tashmore/Tashmore Lake/Tashmore Glen/Tashmore Pond/Tashmore Beach/Tashmore Methodist Church: Mort and Amy Rainey owned a summerhouse in Tashmore Glen. Charlie McGee’s (Firestarter) grandfather, Granther owned a cottage on Tashmore Pond. Tashmore Methodist Church - “And a woman wrote a book last year on the poisonin’s at that church picnic in Tashmore.” (The Colorado Kid) Royal Typewriter – Before acquiring his word processor Mort Rainey typed his manuscripts on an old Royal, which was also used by George Stark. Annie Wilkes (Misery) bought Paul Sheldon an old Royal typewriter to write Misery’s Return. Witcham Street (IT, Hearts in Atlantis, Insomnia, 11/22/63, Full Dark, No Stars, Bag of Bones) Mechanic Falls (‘Salem’s Lot, Mrs Todd’s Shortcut, Needful Things, Rita Hayworh and Shawshank Redemption, Lisey’s Story, Nightmares and Dreamscapes, Everything’s Eventual) Kansas Street, Derry (IT, Insomnia, Everything’s Eventual) John Shooter shares his name with Shooter’s Knob, Tennessee (Lisey’s Story) and Shooters Tavern (Finders Keepers) Sonny Trotts shares his surname with David Trotts, Abigail Freemantle’s (The Stand) first husband. Bates College shares its name with Kathy Bates, who played Annie Wilkes in the movie Misery, and also the Bates Motel in the movie Psycho. Richard Perkins shares his surname with actor Anthony Perkins. He played Norman Bates, proprietor of Bates Motel, in the movie Psycho. *** SUN DOG. Castle Rock Lewiston (Carrie, ‘Salem’s Lot, Cujo, IT, The Dead Zone, Rage, The Running Man, Mrs Todd’s Shortcut, Nona, The Reach, Thinner, The Long Walk, The Woman in the Room, Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption, The Body and (Stud City, by Gordon Lachance) Needful Things, Bag of Bones, Nightmares and Dreamscapes, Lisey’s Story, Doctor Sleep, 11/22/63, Revival) Reginald “Pop” Merrill (The Body, Needful Things) Ace Merrill (The Body, Nona, Needful Things) Norris Ridgewick (The Dark Half, Needful Things, Gerald’s Game, Bag of Bones, Lisey’s Story) Andy Clutterbuck (The Dark Half, Needful Things, Lisey’s Story, It Grows On You) Alan Pangborn (The Dark Half, Needful Things, Bag of Bones, Gerald’s Game) Mrs Chalmers - Evvie Chalmers (Cujo, Needful Things, The Sun Dog) - She shares her surname with Eddie Chalmers (Under The Dome) Polly Chalmers (Bag of Bones, Needful Things, The Dark Half) Sonny Jacket (The Dark Half, Needful Things) Mr Keeton - Danforth “Buster” Keeton III - (The Dark Half, Needful Things) In the Dark Half Buster Keeton owned the six-plot segment of Homeland Cemetery where George Stark was buried. Shawshank State Prison (Rita Hayworth and Shawshank, Apt Pupil, The Body, IT, Dolores Claibourne, Blaze, Bag of Bones, Under The Dome, 11/22/63) Watermill Lane (Needful Things) Nan’s Luncheonette (IT, Needful Things, The Dark Half) Oatley - During Kevin’s nightmare he dreams he is a bum in Oatley, the same town where Jack Sawyer (The Talisman) worked while he was travelling across America. “Fushing feef, fushing FEEF!” (The Talisman) the spider squealed, and then suddenly it scuttled back up into its web below the scrolled tin ceiling. Tin Bridge (Needful Things, Nightmares and Dreamscapes) Juniper Hill (IT, The Tommyknockers, Insomnia, Gerald’s Game, Needful Things, Bag of Bones, 11/22/63, The Dark Half, Fair Extension, Suffer The Little Children) Sonny’s Texaco (The Body, Cell) The Mello Tiger (Cujo, The Body, The Dark Half, Needful Things, Lisey’s Story, Bag of Bones, Revival) “Didos” - Could be,' Pop said indifferently. 'People get up to all sorts of didos. He got up to didos and Sheriff Pangborn slammed him in the jug for it.” “Children are the worst, but even adults get up to didos if you let them” (The Library Policeman) The Emporium Galorium (The Body, Pet Semetery, Needful Things) There is also an emporium galorium mentioned in Under The Dome. “Somehow Ray Towle had kept this dirty little emporium galorium crutching along.” Megan, who couldn't get enough of walking corpses, living dolls, and “cars that came to life and ran down people they didn't like.” (Christine?) LaVerdiere's Super Drug Store (Needful Things) Cujo – (Pet Semetery, Needful Things, DT7 – The Dark Tower) Homeland Cemetery (The Dark Half, The Tommyknockes, Needful Things, Gerald’s Game) Kevin’s Dream: He tore up three or four people at the Trenton Farm in Camberville before he came here. – Donna Trenton and her son Tad were held captive in their car at the Camber place by Cujo. The Village Washtub (‘Salem’s Lot) – Straker purchased the Marsten House and The Village Washtub from Larry Crockett. *** THE LIBRARY POLICEMAN: This book reminded me so much of IT and I’m not really sure why. Even though the story is set in Junction City, Iowa, the whole time I was reading it felt like I was in Derry. Ardelia Lortz - Ardelia reminded me of Leland Gaunt. And also Pennywise, because of her eyes, her silver eyes… ‘She smiled radiantly - everything but the eyes, which seemed to have nickels in them again.” “There's somethin not human, some it hidin inside her skin, and I think I always knew that.” Junction City Iowa – When Leland Gaunt (Needful Things) left Castle Rock he opened a shop in Junction City, Iowa called “ANSWERED PRAYERS, A NEW KIND OF STORE.” Tansy Power shares her first name with Tansy Freneau (Black House) Hannah Verrill - “I expected the dispatcher, you see - it was Hannah Verrill in those days.” Hannah shares her last name with King’s Literary Agent, Chuck Verrill, Grover Verrill (‘Salem’s Lot), Jordy Verrill and Mr Verrill (The Lonesome Death of Jordy Verrill), Meleusippus Deere Verrill and Mr Verrill (The Sun Dog) Naomi Higgins and Proverbia (Needful Things) – “Then he married Naomi Higgins from down the road in Proverbia and off they went, just like young folks almost always do these days.” The Dark Man – “By then Ardelia had gotten all mixed up in my mind with the Library Policeman and the dark man.” Homestead County sheriff, Norman Beeman. There’s a Beeman’s field mentioned in The Body. Gramma Moses – Grandma Moses is mentioned in Duma Key and 11/22/63 as well. Paul Sheldon/Paul Sheldon’s Books (Misery, IT, Rose Madder, Desperation) - 'Naomi is a regular. She borrows a great many romance novels - Jennifer Blake, Rosemary Rogers, Paul Sheldon, people like that.' Burt Iverson shares his surname with Chief Barton Iverson (The Plant) Stephen King – “I have never heard an Ozzy Osbourne record and have no desire to do so, nor to read a novel by Robert McCammon, Stephen King, or V. C. Andrews. Do you see what I'm getting at, Sam?” Didos (The Sun Dog) He sat on the bench, once more feeling like a fourth-grader ... like a fourth-grader who had done something wrong this time, who had gotten up to didos and so couldn't go out and play with the other children at recess. Ted Brautigan (Hearts In Atlantis) “If there are Library Police, I’m afraid they’d be after me.” *** THE LANGOLIERS: The Shop (The Stand, Firestarter, The Tommyknockers) Smiley Face Stickers/Buttons (The Sand, DT7 – The Dark Tower) - When Brian looks on the fuel port of the other airplane in Bangor he notices a round smiley face sticker, similar to the one Randall Flagg wears in The Dark Tower 7. In The Stand he wears a smiley face button on the pocket of his jeans.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Strawberry Fields

    So I decided this year I'm going to re-read some books I haven't read for years, even though my TBR is ever growing. I am glad this is one of the ones I chose. It is as good as I remember. My favorite stories were The Library Police and Secret Window. Still not a huge fan of The Langoliers. I know that is in contrast with a lot of opinions! Stephen King's short stories and novellas are just as captivating as the 1000+ page novels he has written so well. I would be afraid to live inside his head fo So I decided this year I'm going to re-read some books I haven't read for years, even though my TBR is ever growing. I am glad this is one of the ones I chose. It is as good as I remember. My favorite stories were The Library Police and Secret Window. Still not a huge fan of The Langoliers. I know that is in contrast with a lot of opinions! Stephen King's short stories and novellas are just as captivating as the 1000+ page novels he has written so well. I would be afraid to live inside his head for even a second.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

In order to read or download eBook, you need to create FREE account.
eBook available in PDF, ePub, MOBI and Kindle versions



Loading...