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Battlefield of the Mind: Winning the Battle in Your Mind PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: Battlefield of the Mind: Winning the Battle in Your Mind
Author: Joyce Meyer
Publisher: Published October 1st 2002 by FaithWords (first published 1995)
ISBN: 9780446691093
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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In celebration of selling 3 million copies, FaithWords published a special updated edition of BATTLEFIELD OF THE MIND. Worry, doubt, confusion, depression, anger and feelings of condemnation: all these are attacks on the mind. If readers suffer from negative thoughts, they can take heart! Joyce Meyer has helped millions win these all-important battles. In her most popular In celebration of selling 3 million copies, FaithWords published a special updated edition of BATTLEFIELD OF THE MIND. Worry, doubt, confusion, depression, anger and feelings of condemnation: all these are attacks on the mind. If readers suffer from negative thoughts, they can take heart! Joyce Meyer has helped millions win these all-important battles. In her most popular bestseller ever, the beloved author and minister shows readers how to change their lives by changing their minds. She teaches how to deal with thousands of thoughts that people think every day and how to focus the mind the way God thinks. And she shares the trials, tragedies, and ultimate victories from her own marriage, family, and ministry that led her to wondrous, life-transforming truth--and reveals her thoughts and feelings every step of the way. This special updated edition includes an additional introduction and updated content throughout the book.

30 review for Battlefield of the Mind: Winning the Battle in Your Mind

  1. 4 out of 5

    EZ Reader

    I am surviving jail because of this book. I received a DUI and am currently in a work release program. This book is bringing me very close to my lord and Savior. I have always had my faith however it was faltering, at best. I have had such a 180 in my thinking and my life due to this book that I want to come back to this same jail after I am out in August to teach of this book and these principles to others that I see in here that are in very desperate need of these ideals. Thank you and I look I am surviving jail because of this book. I received a DUI and am currently in a work release program. This book is bringing me very close to my lord and Savior. I have always had my faith however it was faltering, at best. I have had such a 180 in my thinking and my life due to this book that I want to come back to this same jail after I am out in August to teach of this book and these principles to others that I see in here that are in very desperate need of these ideals. Thank you and I look for god to direct me in this path if he so sees fit to do such. God Bless!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Elise Wilson

    This is actually my second time reading this book. It has helped me deal with issues of anxiety -- of worrying too much, particularly about things I can't control anyway. Thus, the battlefield of the mind. The book teaches me (I'm still working on this issue.) how to lean on God, how to, as folks say, let go and let God. The result is a peace that surpasses all understanding. Joyce Meyers writes with such simplicity for such a complicated subject. The book is broken down in chapters, each dealing This is actually my second time reading this book. It has helped me deal with issues of anxiety -- of worrying too much, particularly about things I can't control anyway. Thus, the battlefield of the mind. The book teaches me (I'm still working on this issue.) how to lean on God, how to, as folks say, let go and let God. The result is a peace that surpasses all understanding. Joyce Meyers writes with such simplicity for such a complicated subject. The book is broken down in chapters, each dealing with an aspect of the mind and the many ways we allow certain factors to control our thinking and consequently our behavior. It is an easy read in the sense that her writing is plain and to the point. She supports her assertions with Scriptures -- which I love, since, as Christians, we are to be rooted in the Word if we are to overcome battlefields, like those that seek to conquer our minds. I would highly recommend this book to anyone who tends to worry or have anxiety issues. It wouldn't have sold over a million copies had it not benefited so many people. It is a "go-to" book for me, when I find myself worrying too much, which is why I'm reading it again.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    I was given this book by a family member. I knew who Joyce Meyer was but hadn't watched her on tv or listened to her preach, so I didn't come in with an opinion. Overall, it's not a terrible book, and there are a few places where she is inspiring in explaining how to change your perspective. The book is not really appropriate for someone in need of clinical help, though. It's the same as so many other books, with a lot of "feel better by thinking better," which isn't helpful for me and presumabl I was given this book by a family member. I knew who Joyce Meyer was but hadn't watched her on tv or listened to her preach, so I didn't come in with an opinion. Overall, it's not a terrible book, and there are a few places where she is inspiring in explaining how to change your perspective. The book is not really appropriate for someone in need of clinical help, though. It's the same as so many other books, with a lot of "feel better by thinking better," which isn't helpful for me and presumably for many people. I was much better helped by the book Grace for the Afflicted, which specifically addressed clinical problems and paired them with biblical discussions. Meyer's writing style is easy to read and the chapters are brief. If you're just going through rough times, this book would likely be helpful. Some of her stylistic choices were a little annoying for me, however. Her need to add bracketed expansions and explanations to the scriptures she included was incredibly distracting for me and actually made the scriptures more difficult to read, so much that I started specifically skipping her additions. I also feel as though many of her anecdotes seem to be grasps for examples for the book. Perhaps finding better anecdotes from others would have helped more. If someone is going through a temporary rough time, such as after a divorce, this book might be helpful. But for serious issues that have required medical attention, I wouldn't recommend it, as it might have a condescending effect. I found myself getting a little irritated at times with her point of view. I'd recommend Grace for the Afflicted, which I mentioned earlier in this review, or When God Doesn't Make Sense, by James Dobson.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Hergott

    Before I review this, I will say I'm not a huge fan of Joyce Meyer. I've heard and read some of her stuff, and went to one of her conferences with a friend. I'm not sure her teachings are 100% biblical (she's very health/wealth oriented and that's not biblical), though she DOES have some really good things to say. I've been a Christian since I was little so I felt I could read the book with a grain of salt. The reason I gave this book four stars is because it is drenched in scripture. I found my Before I review this, I will say I'm not a huge fan of Joyce Meyer. I've heard and read some of her stuff, and went to one of her conferences with a friend. I'm not sure her teachings are 100% biblical (she's very health/wealth oriented and that's not biblical), though she DOES have some really good things to say. I've been a Christian since I was little so I felt I could read the book with a grain of salt. The reason I gave this book four stars is because it is drenched in scripture. I found myself writing down most of the scriptures she pointed to, taping them to my mirrors, and learning that a lot of my problems come from a bad/negative attitude of my own volition. It truly helped me in some of my relationships and my overall attitude. I also like her no-nonsense approach. I strongly believe so many people's problems come from the simple refusal to just grow up and take responsibility for our thoughts and actions. She highly encourages this, and she discourages pity parties and the martyr syndrome. In THAT, I think she is correct.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rowan

    Admittedly like many others here I not a big fan of televangelists, I appreciate their tremendous work in reaching to an audience that would never consider for themselves going face to face with people in a christian church. I do consider alot of their teaching as baby food in the scale of what should a believer should be eating. However coming at low point recently I began reading this book and fed upon every word. I was surprised and taken back by Joyce Meyor's no nonense, cut and dry approach Admittedly like many others here I not a big fan of televangelists, I appreciate their tremendous work in reaching to an audience that would never consider for themselves going face to face with people in a christian church. I do consider alot of their teaching as baby food in the scale of what should a believer should be eating. However coming at low point recently I began reading this book and fed upon every word. I was surprised and taken back by Joyce Meyor's no nonense, cut and dry approach in her teaching of the true nature of spiritual warfare and the battle that is happening all the time. I was particularly convicted on a number of issues and made aware ( by the Holy Spirit ) of strongholds within me that need to be dealt with. The fact that Joyce puts herself out there by giving examples from her life and ministries of the " many times " that her battles have been lost really edifies her teaching immensely and allows a base for the reader to begin to examine themselves. Overall I think this book will hold itself as essential reading for christians and particularly new ones in the years to come. The fact that it is already so mass produced that it can be very cheaply bought and yet so powerfully change someone's life ( by the work of the Holy Spirit ) is a testament to Joyce, it is completely grounded in scripture all the way through, my critical mind couldn't fault it while my open were being opened and my soul being fed.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten

    First to know, this is a religious-based book. The author, Joyce Meyer, is a popular Christian author and speaker. Her television and radio programs air in many languages and countries. She has also written many books on Christianity, this being one of the more popular. Battlefield of the Mind is about solving some of the common problems we all encounter in life, such as depression, anger, or worry, by getting you to examine the way you think about things, or as the book puts it, "you need to beg First to know, this is a religious-based book. The author, Joyce Meyer, is a popular Christian author and speaker. Her television and radio programs air in many languages and countries. She has also written many books on Christianity, this being one of the more popular. Battlefield of the Mind is about solving some of the common problems we all encounter in life, such as depression, anger, or worry, by getting you to examine the way you think about things, or as the book puts it, "you need to begin to think about what you are thinking about." And that's basically the goal of the whole book. Other major points include: -our actions are a direct result of our thoughts. -thoughts take place in your mind, so your mind is in essence "the battlefield" -if you have a negative mind, you will have a negative life -on the other hand, if you renew you mind according to God's Word, you will have a positive life Much of the book is devoted to getting the reader to change their thinking and discusses how to tear down the "strongholds" that the devil tries to set up in the mind. Joyce uses parables and many personal examples along the way- which makes the book very interesting to read. I personally found it very helpful in my own battles over my mindfulness.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    I thought this book was okay. For me, there was nothing particularly mind-blowing about it. Much of the advice are mantras I've heard before ("this is the power of positive thinking!") or things I already have in practice (taking responsibility for one's actions, working hard, etc.). There was not much "new" information in this book for me. I also found some of the information wrong, some of it to the point where it could be harmful to a reader with already low self-esteem. For example, she talks I thought this book was okay. For me, there was nothing particularly mind-blowing about it. Much of the advice are mantras I've heard before ("this is the power of positive thinking!") or things I already have in practice (taking responsibility for one's actions, working hard, etc.). There was not much "new" information in this book for me. I also found some of the information wrong, some of it to the point where it could be harmful to a reader with already low self-esteem. For example, she talks about what a "normal" mind should be like for a Christian. As part of the requirements for "normal," she says a mind should not be busy, and should not wander. This might be true of some people, but for others, it's not. Adam McHugh's "Introverts in the Church" points out that introverts naturally have a busy mind. Brain scans support his claims by showing the chemical activity in the brain of an introvert vs. an extrovert. Joyce Meyers' portrayal of what a "normal" brain should be like would be discouraging to people like me, who are constantly reviewing and reflecting. It is natural, healthy, and -- you guessed it -- "normal" for us to have a busy mind. Additionally, I had difficulty relating to many of her anecdotes and analogies. I don't mean to put her down, and I am not saying she has never had any real struggles in her life -- I'm sure she has. But many of her stories just made me sigh in frustration. For example, she writes about an experience of God leading her to give a new dress to one of her employees, and she didn't want to give the dress away. (She eventually did, to her credit.) But what about people who are struggling with REAL life-changing decisions? Not everything is so cut-and-dry as "I should give the dress away, because if I keep it, I am being selfish." However, this book did have some good things about it. For one, the writing style is very accessible. She explains herself very thoroughly when discussing Scripture and her beliefs. Secondly, the use of Scripture throughout the book shows that she is very God-centered in her intentions, even if I don't agree with everything she has to say. It is obvious that she really wants to lead people in a good direction. Finally, her theology is pretty solid. Her beliefs don't line up with mine exactly, but her interpretation is pretty standard.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rachel M

    I learned a few very helpful things in reading this book, particularly the concept of disciplining the mind, and of "renewing one's mind" through Scripture. It intrigues (and scares me a little bit) to think that many spiritual battles can be fought in our thoughts, and that we develop patterns of thought unconsciously, for the most part. Sometimes I feel irritated by Joyce Meyer's tried-and-true approach: I often get the sense that she thinks everything that has worked for her will work for eve I learned a few very helpful things in reading this book, particularly the concept of disciplining the mind, and of "renewing one's mind" through Scripture. It intrigues (and scares me a little bit) to think that many spiritual battles can be fought in our thoughts, and that we develop patterns of thought unconsciously, for the most part. Sometimes I feel irritated by Joyce Meyer's tried-and-true approach: I often get the sense that she thinks everything that has worked for her will work for everyone else, in the same ways. She doesn't seem to make allowances for different temperaments or personalities. All in all, I think she addressed a problem that hasn't received much attention, and this book was a welcome read. In this instant age, where we build habits without much purpose or intent, it is important to get back to disciplining our thoughts and discovering how they relate to our actions.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Carlson

    This book literally changed the way I think in the month I spent reading and applying it. I was in a very dark place after a breakup due to some bad decision making and this was exactly what I needed--someone to provide encouragement as well as a push. No excuses, your mind is just that, YOUR mind and it is your responsibility to change it if it is not meeting your needs or working to better your life. That being said, this is a book that should not be read straight through, but should be read s This book literally changed the way I think in the month I spent reading and applying it. I was in a very dark place after a breakup due to some bad decision making and this was exactly what I needed--someone to provide encouragement as well as a push. No excuses, your mind is just that, YOUR mind and it is your responsibility to change it if it is not meeting your needs or working to better your life. That being said, this is a book that should not be read straight through, but should be read slowly and reflected upon (I also journaled through it). Joyce helps to equip the reader with the mind-altering power phrases and techniques necessary to bring anyone out of their funk--if they are willing to put in a little effort. Honestly, I think a lot of the negative reviews on this book come from people who were expecting a cure-all book that simply by reading it would cause everything to suddenly become peachy, but that isn't how life works now, is it? In order to get everything out if this book that you can I'd say there are a few steps to follow: 1. Open in prayer. Ask God to help you to get what you need from the message and to open your mind and heart to what he has to say to you through Joyce's words 2. Keep a journal. Write notes from the chapters and examples of how you are applying or struggling to apply things to your life 3. If you didn't understand or are struggling with applying the topics of a chapter, RE-READ IT! Keep at it until it clicks, both in understanding and in practice. 4. Read it slowly, I'm talking 1-3 (absolutely no more than 3) chapters a day. And only go as fast as you can apply things. 5. Close in prayer, thanking God for the enlightenment and for being there to help you through whatever it is your facing--in fact, thank him FOR what you're facing because when you come out on the other end you'll be a greater person than you were before

  10. 5 out of 5

    Taron

    I've never read a book like this before. I swear she was in my head when she wrote this book. Made me really think about my life and attitude and it made to change in a lot of ways. I went to a group class for this at church and even my husband thanked the two women in charge of the class because this book has changed me. I was quick to open my mouth when people made mad, totally didn't think before I spoke, didn't care what people thought. My way of thinking is what can I do to get back at them I've never read a book like this before. I swear she was in my head when she wrote this book. Made me really think about my life and attitude and it made to change in a lot of ways. I went to a group class for this at church and even my husband thanked the two women in charge of the class because this book has changed me. I was quick to open my mouth when people made mad, totally didn't think before I spoke, didn't care what people thought. My way of thinking is what can I do to get back at them. Yes I let that devil into my head for 40 years. I'm not 100% cured but I'm at about 75%. It's hard to change old habits overnight. I would totally recommend this book to anyone who is always negative, quick to judge or quick to open their mouth!!!! I had a I don't give a crap attitude if u don't like me don't let the door hit u in the butt on the way out. I'm known to be a b&$!h and would live up to that name. So if u want to change ur life and be a happier person this book is for you.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    A drawing point for me to this book was that chess pieces were on the front cover. I find it odd that someone chose to have the white king submitted, while the black king stands victorious over him. What is this symbolic of? Before I get lost in this, I'll move on. Joyce Meyer is either loved or hated, as are many TV evangelists - there are not many inbetweens. I guess I fall inbetween. This book is very simply written. It is double-spaced and comes in at 278 pages. The bibliography consists of t A drawing point for me to this book was that chess pieces were on the front cover. I find it odd that someone chose to have the white king submitted, while the black king stands victorious over him. What is this symbolic of? Before I get lost in this, I'll move on. Joyce Meyer is either loved or hated, as are many TV evangelists - there are not many inbetweens. I guess I fall inbetween. This book is very simply written. It is double-spaced and comes in at 278 pages. The bibliography consists of the "Random House Unabridged Dictionary", "Strong's The New Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible", "Vine's An Expository Dictionary of New Testament Words", and "Webster's II New Riverside University Dictionary". "Battle Field of the Mind" has sold over 2 million copies. People are essentially simple-minded. Isaac Asimov stated that his objective in writing, was to write as simply as possible, being as clear as possible. Well done then, Joyce, good and faithful servant. The contents of "Battle Field of the Mind" are broken into three parts: "The Importance of the Mind", "Conditions of the Mind", and "Wilderness Mentalities". The main message found here is to "think about what you are thinking about". Various scriptures taken from the Amplified Bible, as well as King James, are spread throughout the book, validating Meyer's teachings on the mind. Though I was not impressed with Joyce's writing style, I appreciated her insights, and her knowledge of the Bible. Certainly, there are things here to think about, and think deeply about. Confessing not only covers our sin, but also helps us to recognize and analyze where it is that we are habitually falling into sin. Socrates tells us "A life unexamined is not worth living." The writer of Proverbs tells us "For as he thinks in his heart, so is he." By examining our thinking, our minds, we are better able to examine our lives. As Joyce states more than once: "The mind is the battlefield." All was well with Joyce and I until I came to chapter 10, within which she argues that reason is an abnormal way of thinking, and that reason leads to confusion. I believe she takes Matthew 16.8, James 1:22, Proverbs 3:5, and 1 Corinthians 2:1,2 completely out of context. Paul said he resolved to know nothing among us except Jesus Christ. Without reason, we could not recognize Paul as being paradoxical - he is truly one of the most logical and intellectual writers in the bible! Joyce's book here was written using reason, which, in the image of God, we were gifted with (granted she used a smaller portion of reason in her writing than say, Charles Spurgeon). So, this chapter, in my opinion, needs to be completely trashed and rewritten. Reason is not abnormal thinking. It is a wonderful tool without which we would only have religion. Myer Pearlman states that "theology literally means 'a treatise or reasoned discourse about God'. Theology, or doctrine, may be described as a science which deals with our knowledge of God and His relations to man. We call theology a science because science is the systematic and logical arrangement of certified facts. Theology consists of facts relating to God and Divine things, presented in an orderly and logical manner. Religion comes from a Latin word meaning 'to bind'; religion represents those activities which bind man to God in a certain relationship. Theology is knowledge about God. Thus religion is practice, while theology is knowledge. Religion and theology should go together in the balanced experience; but in practice they are sometimes separated so that one may be a theologian without being truly religious and on the other hand one may be truly religious without possessing a systematic knowledge of doctrinal truth. 'If ye know these things, happy are ye if ye do them," is God's message to the theologian. 'Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth' (2 Tim. 2:15), is God's message for the spiritual man." Is that not brilliant? Bravo!, Mr. Pearlman, Bravo! Joyce Meyer, we do not need to fear reason - it will not lead to atheism, unless applied in earnest to atheism (which should then, if the logician is honest, in the very least, lead the atheist to agnosticism). We are to apply our Godly ratiocination to his Word. I don't know how Joyce reasoned herself into such an unreasonable reasoning of reason. I don't think it's just her. I think that the Body of Christ is terrified of logic, and sees it as cold and terrible. This is why they are called "religious folk". After Chapter 10 of "Battle Field of the Mind" I truly began to appreciate the depth of Meyer, which at first appearance, to me, seemed shallow. This is the beauty of the book - and the same beauty can be found in the gospel. It seemed to me too, that by the end of the book, Joyce's vocabulary was expanding, and her prose growing sharper (I realize that she has written over 70 published books). There is a lot of information covered in the book that I'd like to get into. Reading it once seems a shame, therefore, in this case, unlike the cases of many other books, a workbook would be preferable—I'll be keeping my eye out for one. Joyce points out many historical facts of the bible, including that it was an 11-day journey the Jews had to cross over into the promised land - God kept them in the wilderness for 40 years; in turn, her "Wilderness Mentalities" section was quite insightful. I think her favorite word at the time of writing this was "exhortative" — she used it much. I too enjoyed the little tales of trials in her personal life, and the wisdom she gleaned from them. I hear she is writing fiction now - which I'd be interested in reading. I might point out another oddity in the book, which I found highly entertaining. In Chapter 15, under "Meditate and Be Healed", Joyce states that: "My appearance has been changed during the past 18 years. People tell me that I actually look at least 15 years younger today than I did when I first began to diligently study the Word and make it the central focus of my entire life." It is quite common knowledge now that Joyce Meyer has gone under the knife (I thought she was hotter before, as a friend told me I was the type that would always choose the before pictures on those infomercials, and he's right)...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Revcarmen Aka

    If one christian woman I love and admire is Joyce Meyers. She knows what she is talking about and what I love about her she keeps it real and we need that in our daily life. We need to keep it real and be real with ourselves and with others. She pratice what she preach. She has been there and know what we all faces in life and what we go thru emotionally. My advice to all my friends and check her out and read her book it will blow your mind. Her book help not only women but everyone how to deal w If one christian woman I love and admire is Joyce Meyers. She knows what she is talking about and what I love about her she keeps it real and we need that in our daily life. We need to keep it real and be real with ourselves and with others. She pratice what she preach. She has been there and know what we all faces in life and what we go thru emotionally. My advice to all my friends and check her out and read her book it will blow your mind. Her book help not only women but everyone how to deal with your emotional issues and behavior she is like a Christian Dr. LoL that is how I see her. Her books has help me and heal me in my journey of life and so I want to share with you what has help me in my life. She is on cable and has her own tv program find in your tv guide for her listing and check her out I know u going to love her. I hope I can bless someone! By sharing you what has help me personally.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Am I losing the battle in my mind since I didn't like this book? Sigh... Where to start? I guess I'll first point out that I see where this book could help a lot of people, but it wasn't for me. I must've recognized this early on because at the top of page nine I scribbled "Reminder: take what you can use and leave the rest." This was the book for our bible study session these past few months. I got a few things out of it, but a lot of it was just... ugh. I still can't completely put my finger on Am I losing the battle in my mind since I didn't like this book? Sigh... Where to start? I guess I'll first point out that I see where this book could help a lot of people, but it wasn't for me. I must've recognized this early on because at the top of page nine I scribbled "Reminder: take what you can use and leave the rest." This was the book for our bible study session these past few months. I got a few things out of it, but a lot of it was just... ugh. I still can't completely put my finger on all of it. Maybe it'll come out as I type this out. This woman's writing style sometimes nearly drove me mad. We watched a small segment of her speaking, and I think she's a much better speaker than writer, which is the opposite of Richard Dawson, the dude who wrote the book for last year's Bible study session. I liked his book, but the one time we watched him I wanted to throw up. Joyce should stick to speaking if the rest of her nearly 90 books are like this one. I can see where she could certainly work an audience. Kudos there, Joyce. As I read along I kept getting the notion that this woman might be a twit, though I don't believe that after seeing her speaking segment, and looking at what she's accomplished, but the way she comes across with her writing... I suspected I was in trouble when I got to page x. Yes, x. I wasn't even out of the introduction. The book we read was the updated version, and she's discussing doing the update: "In order to prepare for this special edition of Battlefield of the Mind I needed to read the entire book. I really like it!!!" "I had not read it since I wrote it and was personally encouraged and edified. It is easy to read and contains one of the foundational truths that we must have in order to access the new life we are offered through our relationships with Christ." Okay, not only does this scream "bubblehead," it also indicates that she might be stuck on herself. Fine. Whatever. That doesn't mean she can't still deliver a good message. If I can get past the personality, there might be some good principles. But this kind of silliness was peppered throughout the text. Page 153: "In an earlier chapter we have already discussed the absolute necessity of positive thinking. You may even want to go back to Chapter 5 at this point and refresh your memory on the importance of being positive. I just went back and read it and got blessed myself even though I wrote it." ... Page 81. She's discussing the dangers of a wondering mind. I don't see the harm in a little woolgathering every now and then, especially if it's not distracting you from a task at hand, but she says that's bad. (The wondering mind section was one of the many parts I left.) She used to wonder about her son Danny's grades because apparently they weren't good. She doesn't state that outright, but that's how I read it. Her take on this was "Instead of wondering what kind of grades Danny will get, I can believe that he will make good grades." Fine. That's a good way to turn your mind if you're trying to be more positive. She really should've left the matter alone right there, but in the next paragraph we get this: "UPDATE: Our son Danny did not like school and struggled all the way through so I did a lot of wondering about him and his future. I thought you would enjoy knowing that he is currently the CEO of Joyce Meyer Ministries. All my wondering was wasted time. God knew His (sic) future and had everything under control." For anyone not keeping up, Joyce Meyer Ministries was created by the same Joyce Meyer who authored this book. Woman, YOU GAVE HIM A JOB! I'm sure he does it well, but... Never mind. Moving on. The Biblical quotes used in this primarily come from the Amplified Bible. I've never read that one much, but I can now say that I hate the Amplified Bible. Don't get me wrong; it's just another thing that ain't for me. I can see where it would come in very handy for someone who doesn't have a great deal of education, and there's nothing wrong with that. I'm all for people trying to get a better grasp of things any way they can. But for someone who is marginally familiar with the Bible, and can read it without needing every other phrase explained in parentheses and brackets, it's distracting. It's dumbed down so far that it's intellectually insulting to the educated. I'm sorry if that sounds crass, but I call it like I see it. I would much prefer a regular translation, even the King James version which I don't have any trouble reading, but that's just me. If you like the Amplified, then its inclusion works in your favor. I skipped everything in the brackets because I was missing the message. Here's Psalm 1:1 from the AMP: Blessed (happy, fortunate, prosperous, and enviable) is the man who walks and lives not in the counsel of the ungodly [following their advice, their plans and purposes], nor stands [submissive and inactive] in the path where sinners walk, nor sits down [to relax and rest] where the scornful [and the mockers] gather. I don't know if I've ever met anyone who doesn't know the meaning of the word "blessed." Anyway, you get the idea. I don't need everything defined and expounded upon; I can get the gist without someone holding my hand, so this isn't useful to me. If it helps you, go for it. A lot of the biblical passages used were forced into the scenario making it feel contrived. Things were often taken out of context to make a point that wasn't in the original meaning, but I think that's par for the course when discussing religion. As for the content, well I had some trouble there too. There's a premise that I couldn't get behind, and this is especially present in the first two sections. Apparently Satan is behind all of our bad thoughts. I don't buy that, and that being the case a lot of the solutions weren't apropos. I ask God every morning to run the show; to use me to speak his words and do his work. I trust that He's doing that. It even says somewhere in here that if I ask God for these kinds of things that he'll do them, (but then it contradicted that statement at other times. It's all rather confusing.) Anyway, if God is taking care of everything, how does Satan even have a chance? I believe that a human has the capacity for evil without a fallen angel, or demon, or something else forcing him to it. I believe a human has the capacity for love as well without something forcing that as well. I don't believe that Satan is responsible for everything that goes wrong in my life. All this talk of Satan sounded like a cop-out for not taking personal responsibility for my own actions, and just playing the victim card. When I do that I'm stuck at "blame," and when I'm stuck there I can't move forward. I need to own my part of my mess before I can get better. I can't own it if it's someone else's fault. A lot of the solutions were overly simplistic, and I don't think they apply as well to people who truly have depression or other mental conditions. I think people who have depression ought to do these things, for they can help, but other measures should be taken as well. (Those other measures should be addressed with a therapist or the like. God has certainly provided plenty of them to help us). And it seems like Joyce feels if you're following her suggestions and you're still not happy, then you must not be doing it right; you just don't have enough faith. Yeah, well, sit on it, sister. There are things in here that I'm putting into practice. Positive thinking helps; I've seen it work in others and I've seen it work in me sometimes, but it waxes and wanes. One thing I've learned from this Bible study is that I'm quite different from the majority of the rest of the group. I was astounded at some of the things I heard. There's a chapter at the end in the "Wilderness Mentalities" section called "My life is so miserable; I feel sorry for myself because my life is so wretched!" Several people said they had never felt that way in their lives, and I just couldn't relate. Never? Ever? Never ever? And I don't believe for one moment that any of them were lying. I, on the other hand, live that way for weeks on end sometimes, and I got quite resentful and jealous. Luckily there's a chapter that covers jealousy and envy pretty soon after that one. The "Wilderness Mentalities" section of the book was my favorite part, and might've saved this from a one star rating. I could get behind the problems and the solutions for most of them. The first two sections... not so much. Mind-binding spirits? Please. Oh, and that reminds me. Here's another section I'm afraid I had to leave behind: Another example of the way the spirit and the mind work together is the gift of tongues with interpretation. When I speak in tongues, my mind is unfruitful until God gives either me or someone else the understanding of what I am saying; then my mind becomes fruitful. Please keep in mind that the gifts are not tongues and translation. Translation is an exact word-for-word account of the message, whereas in interpretation one person gives an understanding of what another has said, but in the interpreter's own style as expressed through his own particular personality. Let me give you an example: Sister Smith may stand up in church and give a message in an unknown tongue. It has come from her spirit, and neither she nor anyone else knows what she has said. God may cause me to understand what the message was, but perhaps in a general way. As I step out in faith, and begin to interpret what was spoken, I make the message understandable to all. But it comes through me in my own unique way of expression. I sometimes speak in tongues, but that's just me making nonsense noises to amuse myself. If anyone ever comes up and tells me they understand what I'm saying... Well, I'll cross that bridge when I get to it. I suspect I'll just humor them, and be glad God spoke to them, and hope I didn't tell them to kill the pope. Wrap up: I guess I'll end where I started. Take what you can use, and leave the rest, but I'm afraid there just wasn't much I could use in this one. I'm in the minority for goodreaders since this currently has a 4.31 rating on here, so if you can get with the program, rock on. In fact, I have a couple of friends who might actually enjoy this. I think I'll pass it on to them.

  14. 4 out of 5

    April

    While I did not particularly care for Meyer's writing style - it felt too informal, too much like she wanted to be close with her readers - this was a good read. It was slow for me to read because there was so much in it to digest (and also, it's not a book to read if you're looking for something light to read - her writing style is light, but the ideas presented in the book are anything but light). However, I am glad that I read it. The only reason it didn't get a 5/5 was because of the writing While I did not particularly care for Meyer's writing style - it felt too informal, too much like she wanted to be close with her readers - this was a good read. It was slow for me to read because there was so much in it to digest (and also, it's not a book to read if you're looking for something light to read - her writing style is light, but the ideas presented in the book are anything but light). However, I am glad that I read it. The only reason it didn't get a 5/5 was because of the writing style. It was hard for me to get into it after not reading it for awhile, because of the "clunky" way that Meyer uses words, also. She is definitely not what I would consider a literary person, since there were quite a few grammatical errors that were not caught, but her ideas are soundly based in Christian theology. I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in learning about how to cope with problems as a Christian. The latter half of the book (approximately) is filled with ten "Wilderness Mentalities" - reasons that the Israelites stayed in the desert for 40 years instead of going to the Promised Land - and she goes into depth explaining how they still apply to us today. I found this part of the book especially useful.

  15. 4 out of 5

    David

    My mother gave me this book, probably as some passive-aggressive insult. Let's skip past the fact that this book has the single most redundant title I've ever seen, and the book's numerous proofing errors and the general shoddiness of the prose. She begins the first chapter by telling me that some of my thoughts come from the devil. (Excuse me--"The Devil," as Joyce Meyer would render it.) Happily, this isn't true; if I believed it were, I would almost certainly develop paranoid schizophrenia. Ce My mother gave me this book, probably as some passive-aggressive insult. Let's skip past the fact that this book has the single most redundant title I've ever seen, and the book's numerous proofing errors and the general shoddiness of the prose. She begins the first chapter by telling me that some of my thoughts come from the devil. (Excuse me--"The Devil," as Joyce Meyer would render it.) Happily, this isn't true; if I believed it were, I would almost certainly develop paranoid schizophrenia. Certainly, one may have thoughts or thought patterns which are counterproductive and harmful, but can you people really not take responsibility for your own thoughts? You have to blame them on an outside agent? This seems immature, and also Zoroastrian? Are Christians even supposed to believe that their devil is as powerful as their god? So, Meyer ends the first chapter by saying, "Let's illustrate this with a parable." She then describes, for several pages, a fictional couple named Mary and John. Mary and John are miserable, and they generally suck, because Mary wants to be independent, "have her own money," work, and make decisions for herself, and John is weak lets Mary walk all over him. Literally, she insists for several pages that these fictional characters have negative thought patterns and miserable lives because they don't fit into rigid gender norms. I don't know if Joyce Meyer actually believes this, but it saddens me to think she may. I didn't read any more than the first chapter, because I don't want to become any more depressed than I am already. This book made me shed a tiny tear for humanity.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    This book reminds us to pay attention to our thought life because our mind is the battlefield where the spiritual battle for our soul is taking place. Ephesians 6:12 states "For we are not wrestling with flesh and blood, but against the despotisms, against the powers, against the world rulers of the present darkness, against the spirit forces of wickedness in the heavenly(supernatural) sphere." "Our warfare is not with other human beings but with the devil and his demons. Our enemy, Satan, attem This book reminds us to pay attention to our thought life because our mind is the battlefield where the spiritual battle for our soul is taking place. Ephesians 6:12 states "For we are not wrestling with flesh and blood, but against the despotisms, against the powers, against the world rulers of the present darkness, against the spirit forces of wickedness in the heavenly(supernatural) sphere." "Our warfare is not with other human beings but with the devil and his demons. Our enemy, Satan, attempts to defeat us with strategy and deceit, through well-laid plans and deliberate deception." Battlefield of the Mind pg 15. I think the author, Joyce Meyer, is truly led by God and if you read this book and follow the biblical directions, you will be well on your way to being properly prepared and adequately armed to fight this battle.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    2/11/15 I liked the straight-forward manner in which this book was written. There was a lot of practical, insightful information. I suspect my mind works very similarly to the way Joyce Meyers' did before she learned the lessons outlined in this book. One of the many points I appreciated was that we want our mind to be in a state of rest, which allows us to be led by the Spirit more readily. This would be in stark contrast to those occasions when we let our thoughts run rampant, as they are some 2/11/15 I liked the straight-forward manner in which this book was written. There was a lot of practical, insightful information. I suspect my mind works very similarly to the way Joyce Meyers' did before she learned the lessons outlined in this book. One of the many points I appreciated was that we want our mind to be in a state of rest, which allows us to be led by the Spirit more readily. This would be in stark contrast to those occasions when we let our thoughts run rampant, as they are sometimes prone to do. There were many other nuggets I took away from the book as well. I hope they stay with me a long time.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Annamae

    EVERY Christian needs to read this book! We all struggle with our thoughts and even depression. This book is amazing. Joyce Meyer has been stuck in the negative tailspin that negative thinking produces and overcame it with the Word of God. This book is such an easy read. I recommend the study guide that goes with it as well. Underline and take notes. It's amazing what you'll learn from this book! I have read it twice.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nicki

    This book was really great at helping me to realize what thoughts I was allowing to be present in my head; most of them were negative and self-defeating. The book also gave me great tools to use to change my thought process and have a more positive outlook.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Latesha A.

    my copy of BOTM came from a Minister that became a regular at the thrift store i work in. i didn't know she was (is) a Minister until she retrieved the book from her car one day and said God told her to give me her copy...for that reason alone, this book holds a special place on my bookshelf...it's been a while since i've read it (and i plan to read it again as a sort of refresher) but this book left a lasting impression on me b/c it literally changed my life and transformed my whole way of thin my copy of BOTM came from a Minister that became a regular at the thrift store i work in. i didn't know she was (is) a Minister until she retrieved the book from her car one day and said God told her to give me her copy...for that reason alone, this book holds a special place on my bookshelf...it's been a while since i've read it (and i plan to read it again as a sort of refresher) but this book left a lasting impression on me b/c it literally changed my life and transformed my whole way of thinking... i'm 38 and as long as i can remember, i've been a 'worry-wart'...i was very tender, emotional, sensitive, and i took just about everything personal. i also didn't believe in the devil (as in 'the devil made me do it' type stuff)...i could go on and on about how i used to think and believe but the bottom line is this book changed my life in ways i didn't think possible. i'm a whole lot less angry with people with nasty attitudes and evil ways and a whole lot more understanding, patient, and content...i can't even begin to describe how peaceful it is in my head! i literally used to 'play' conversations and situations in my head, expecting the most negative reactions and outcomes in certain situations that i drove myself to my very first (and biggest) nervous breakdown/anxiety attack at the tender age of 24! as a result of reading this book, i decided to purchase In Pursuit of Peace (also by JM) b/c reading BOTM made me CRAVE this awesome peace of mind so much that i needed to find out how to have peace in all other aspects of my life (home, work, family, relationships, etc...) it's taking me longer to finish that book (i've gotten into the habit of reading 2-3 books at a time, What's so Amazing About Grace and Resolution for Women are also on my nightstand) but i'll be back with a review on it soon... as far as JM's style of writing/ministering...it's real talk...something i can relate to...i have several of her books as well as the JM/The Everyday Life Bible and as someone else mentioned in another review (or several actually), her 'translations' in italics that seem to be kind of thrown in here and there does sometimes get a little distracting (i'm easily distracted lol) so i just skip over them and go back to them later in case i feel the need for clarification.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Brilliant! Amazing! Life changing! Read this book and you'll know why it was on the New York best sellers list for ages and why its still a best seller more than ten years on. This book is writen for people who have problems with worry, anxiety, and fears. (lets face it, all of us) Its writen for people with all these problems by a person who had them and yet fought through to regain the control in her mind. Im one of those people who likes to be taught how to cook by the chef that can actually co Brilliant! Amazing! Life changing! Read this book and you'll know why it was on the New York best sellers list for ages and why its still a best seller more than ten years on. This book is writen for people who have problems with worry, anxiety, and fears. (lets face it, all of us) Its writen for people with all these problems by a person who had them and yet fought through to regain the control in her mind. Im one of those people who likes to be taught how to cook by the chef that can actually cook, not instruct me out of the recipe book. Joyce Meyer is that person. She understands and describes the feelings and problems in ways that made me sit up and go, "thats me!" She knows the problem and has a revolutionary way to fight back, we CAN choose what we think. The mind is the ultimate battlefield against the enemy, and I'm fighting for God! This is not a magic wand, though. If you think by reading it all your problems will instantly melt away your in for a shock. BUT, this book shines the light in the darkness through scritpure and Gods revelation, giving you the building blocks of how to destory those evil thoughts that the enemy controls you with. You have to do your part and apply what you've learnt, every single day. Its a struggle and I'm not there yet but, I am going to live the life NOW that Christ died for me to have. I cant say enough great things about this book except, READ IT! and change your life with God.

  22. 4 out of 5

    J.W. Cunningham

    This is one of the best books I have ever read. When my boss recommended this book he told me that it would change the way I approached situations and would make the people around me very transparent. That turned out to be a very true statement. This book truly makes you analyze your ow approach to life, but also gives you tools to understand the inner workings of other's minds that cause them to act and speak the way they do. Meyer's approach to writing the book is based in a christian approach. This is one of the best books I have ever read. When my boss recommended this book he told me that it would change the way I approached situations and would make the people around me very transparent. That turned out to be a very true statement. This book truly makes you analyze your ow approach to life, but also gives you tools to understand the inner workings of other's minds that cause them to act and speak the way they do. Meyer's approach to writing the book is based in a christian approach. She sets up each small section of discussion with a scripture. While the first 2/3 of the book is highly enlightening and well worth the read, the last 1/3 made the book for me. In the last third of the book Meyer analyzes the 10 Wilderness mentalities. Having an understanding of these mindsets really changes the way that you approach the people around you, and more importantly causes you to consider you own thinking. If you have a desire to be optimistic, being familiar with these mentalities in order to rid yourself of them is a necessity.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brandilyn's Blog

    I thought this book was the biggest eye opener. For me personally I learned that me being so distracted, raising mind, and clutter minded was not me at all but 1. my mind had become a weak muscle and 2. attack from the enemy. Since I started reading this book, I've passed the helpfulness on to several people who have started reading it and love it as much as I do. It's helped me in almost all areas of my life; from being a wife, a mom, homemaker, a blogger, and a Life Coach. Not to mention not o I thought this book was the biggest eye opener. For me personally I learned that me being so distracted, raising mind, and clutter minded was not me at all but 1. my mind had become a weak muscle and 2. attack from the enemy. Since I started reading this book, I've passed the helpfulness on to several people who have started reading it and love it as much as I do. It's helped me in almost all areas of my life; from being a wife, a mom, homemaker, a blogger, and a Life Coach. Not to mention not only has it set me free from my ever and over thinking mind but helped me Spiritually b/c I know now I can take charge of my thoughts, focus on meditating on God, reading my Bible and my prayer time. It's helped me emotionally b/c I can now control and not live by my emotions. All around a give it 2 thumbs up, 5 stars and anything else that says it a MUST READ on my list.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sharae

    Joyce Meyer breaks it down so simply. That is the strength of this book. Sure I'm familiar with everything she says, with the remedies, the anecdotes. However, just because you know something, doesn't mean you remember to apply it to daily life. When I read this book, I was going through a prolonged tough and discouraging time. When you're in a situation things you hear from a pulpit don't always jump to the forefront of your mind as you struggle through the week. Enter Battlefield of The Mind. Joyce Meyer breaks it down so simply. That is the strength of this book. Sure I'm familiar with everything she says, with the remedies, the anecdotes. However, just because you know something, doesn't mean you remember to apply it to daily life. When I read this book, I was going through a prolonged tough and discouraging time. When you're in a situation things you hear from a pulpit don't always jump to the forefront of your mind as you struggle through the week. Enter Battlefield of The Mind. It provided me with clarity and helped/reminded me to look at my problems from a different angle so I could surmount them. I found it very empowering and helpful. A book to read again and again when needed. It's on my treasured books bookshelf.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Maaike

    Mooi en krachtig boek over -hoe verrassend- de strijd die je kunt hebben in je denken. ze schrijft op een prettige manier en laat ook haar eigen zwakheden op dit gebied zien als voorbeelden in het boek. enige minpunt vond ik de bijbelteksten die uitgeschreven zijn, ik had gekozen voor een andere vertaling. (in de teksten staan stukjes toegevoegd om het te verduidelijken maar daardoor vond ik het juist onduidelijker worden)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shanon

    Life changing...

  27. 5 out of 5

    Desiree

    Pretty essential book for helping to manage your thoughts and emotions. This is grounded in biblical teachings by virtue of the Bible verses that serve as the foundation of the book. Some of it was a little repetitive but I suppose that serves to reinforce the messages and principles.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gavin Abdollahi

    "Patience is not the ability to wait. It's the ability to keep a good attitude while waiting. OWRs: Life-changing Amazing Helpful Eye-opening Rereadable Writing: 9.5/10 Mrs. Meyer is an amazing author. I'm honestly having a hard time describing her skill (it's so much easier reviewing fiction books). Her writing's... Honest? Life changing? Believable? All of the above? In this book, she tackled various problems that we all have come face to face with; such as our wilderness mentalities, jealousy, stubb "Patience is not the ability to wait. It's the ability to keep a good attitude while waiting. OWRs: Life-changing Amazing Helpful Eye-opening Rereadable Writing: 9.5/10 Mrs. Meyer is an amazing author. I'm honestly having a hard time describing her skill (it's so much easier reviewing fiction books). Her writing's... Honest? Life changing? Believable? All of the above? In this book, she tackled various problems that we all have come face to face with; such as our wilderness mentalities, jealousy, stubbornness, and many more important issues related to our mind. For each of the problems, she was able to find the perfect Bible verse; and when she wrote down examples, she was honest and wasn't afraid to tell us about her own imperfections so that we may better ourselves. She also managed to open my eyes to the importance of our thoughts, and how the mind really is a constant battlefield; a battlefield which we must fight in vigorously and perseverantly. She also taught me the importance of meditating on the Word and thinking about what I just read. She showed me that I was reading the Bible wrong all this time and was being lazy and relying too much on other people's revelations. Her writing also isn't boring or hard to read... In fact, it's like reading a written version of a very long and fluent sermon. Self-Help Value: 10/10 So far, this is the best self-help book I've ever read. Reading it will change your life. That is, if you're willing to let it change you. It will open your eyes to important this and will help you and inspire you to fix your wrongs. It will also help you become a better Christian. All in all: This was a great book; one worth meditating and rereading. As a professional critic would say: After this first taste of Mrs. Meyer's writing, I'm hungry for more. 5/5 Stars.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    There are some religious books that you read and you agree with most things, but wish it had been written by someone else. That's kind of how I felt about this; Meyer is a fine writer and her work is lovely, but I felt like I was reading a high school textbook. There were little text boxes off to the side to make sure you understood the important parts; there were nice, bold headings so you knew when new ideas were introduced; I half expected a glossary at the back. There were so many great ideas There are some religious books that you read and you agree with most things, but wish it had been written by someone else. That's kind of how I felt about this; Meyer is a fine writer and her work is lovely, but I felt like I was reading a high school textbook. There were little text boxes off to the side to make sure you understood the important parts; there were nice, bold headings so you knew when new ideas were introduced; I half expected a glossary at the back. There were so many great ideas and kernels of ideas here; Meyer really does have some important things to say, and I absolutely believe that the way you think has a tremendous impact on the way you live your life. But that's not all of it, and I think that these great ideas got really simplified in order to fit into these neat, bite-sized, fortune cookie chapters, and great ideas hardly ever fit into fortune cookies. (Some do. But they're rare, and often paired with lucky numbers that aren't lucky in the least in a sort of cosmic scale-balancing.) Writing a book on religion and faith is one thing; this felt way more like a self-help how-to. I'm also really not a fan of how this handled scripture: three cheers for the sheer amount of it, to be sure, but most of the quotations had tons of variants built in or extrapolations within the verses. Other readings are nice, because it's important to remember that translations can totally change what a verse seems to mean, but if you're going to use the Bible as authority, don't add stuff to it. Even if it's in an attempt to clarify, additions are only adding yet another layer of interpretation to something that already has a ton of human personality infused in it. All in all, there are some really solid things in this book, and I'm glad to have read it. I just don't think I can justify keeping it on my shelves.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Pastordiana Brevan

    All Of Joyces BattleField of the Mind Tools is great to have in your libary as well as the Workbooks. Highly reccogmended this even to give out as gifts for those to be fed upon it, Worry, doubt, confusion, depression, anger and feelings of condemnation: all these are attacks on the mind. If readers suffer from negative thoughts, they can take heart! Joyce Meyer has helped millions win these all-important battles. In her most popular bestseller ever, the beloved author and minister shows readers All Of Joyces BattleField of the Mind Tools is great to have in your libary as well as the Workbooks. Highly reccogmended this even to give out as gifts for those to be fed upon it, Worry, doubt, confusion, depression, anger and feelings of condemnation: all these are attacks on the mind. If readers suffer from negative thoughts, they can take heart! Joyce Meyer has helped millions win these all-important battles. In her most popular bestseller ever, the beloved author and minister shows readers how to change their lives by changing their minds. She teaches how to deal with thousands of thoughts that people think every day and how to focus the mind the way God thinks. And she shares the trials, tragedies, and ultimate victories from her own marriage, family, and ministry that led her to wondrous, life-transforming truth—and reveals her thoughts and feelings every step of the way. I have taught this book through out the years, given this tool as a gift to many for this is one Gift the Lord given Joyce Meyers to Write His Words of Utterance for every Believer for Everyone of Gods Creation should have this tool in their library Why Because in the battlefield of the mind awaits their testimony so get your highlighter ready and your notepad I guarantee you will continue to return to open up these pages. Enjoy this Feeding IN Jesus Mighty Name this day to many more years to come! This is the greatest Encouragement that one should receive.

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