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Romeo and Juliet PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: Romeo and Juliet
Author: Gareth Hinds
Publisher: Published September 10th 2013 by Candlewick Press
ISBN: 9780763659486
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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Gareth Hinds’s stylish graphic adaptation of the Bard’s romantic tragedy offers modern touches — including a diverse cast that underscores the story’s universality. She’s a Capulet. He’s a Montague. But when Romeo and Juliet first meet, they don’t know they’re from rival families — and when they find out, they don’t care. Their love is honest and raw and all-consuming. But Gareth Hinds’s stylish graphic adaptation of the Bard’s romantic tragedy offers modern touches — including a diverse cast that underscores the story’s universality. She’s a Capulet. He’s a Montague. But when Romeo and Juliet first meet, they don’t know they’re from rival families — and when they find out, they don’t care. Their love is honest and raw and all-consuming. But it’s also dangerous. How much will they have to sacrifice before they can be together? In a masterful adaptation faithful to Shakespeare’s original text, Gareth Hinds transports readers to the sun-washed streets and market squares of Shakespeare’s Verona, vividly bringing the classic play to life on the printed page.

30 review for Romeo and Juliet

  1. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    Graphic novel form of the famous play makes this easy to read and understand. I don't know if this is unabridged or not, but most of the play is here. I think the English is modernized too. The art is lovely and the characters are still timeless. Gareth says he used a diverse cast to show that this story is universal. I found it quick and easy to read and I think it would be great for youngsters who are curious about these stories. I want to look at more of Gareth Hinds work. This was good and a Graphic novel form of the famous play makes this easy to read and understand. I don't know if this is unabridged or not, but most of the play is here. I think the English is modernized too. The art is lovely and the characters are still timeless. Gareth says he used a diverse cast to show that this story is universal. I found it quick and easy to read and I think it would be great for youngsters who are curious about these stories. I want to look at more of Gareth Hinds work. This was good and a great way to re-read this story. 14 year olds are so silly. Again, they die.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Grace Galinski

    I read this book quite a while ago, I just forgot to add it on here and write a review. From what I remember, the book was pretty good. I found it confusing a couple times, but only due to some of the language used. But overall, I did like it quite a bit.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Nguyen

    I really liked how the illustrator took liberties with using a diverse cast of characters. I'm not sure why, but it bothers me that Hinds used the word "universal" to express why he changed the race of the characters. Instead of Italians in Verona, the Capulets were Indian, and the Montagues were Black. Hinds was right, though. Their race changes pretty much did nothing to the plot. It made it easier to spot out a Capulet and a Montague, but that was about it. Romeo was still infuriating as hell I really liked how the illustrator took liberties with using a diverse cast of characters. I'm not sure why, but it bothers me that Hinds used the word "universal" to express why he changed the race of the characters. Instead of Italians in Verona, the Capulets were Indian, and the Montagues were Black. Hinds was right, though. Their race changes pretty much did nothing to the plot. It made it easier to spot out a Capulet and a Montague, but that was about it. Romeo was still infuriating as hell. Juliet was about the same (somehow I'm always only annoyed by Romeo in all these reincarnations). The nurse was an enabler. There was a whole lot of illiteracy, as usual. The priest was a very smart and wise man but is in the same way an enabler. Hinds pretty much kept everything intact. I think the part I like the best is how true to the source material this graphic novel was. I'm not really fond of this particular play. It's not that the story is terrible. In fact, this particular tragedy has among the best and tightest storytelling out of all Shakespeare's stuff. Along with great storytelling, the characters are extremely compelling. I could only think of Macbeth and Hamlet, which are also popular tragedies. However, they don't have such a hold as R+J does. It's the characters that really stick with people. They're simple and yet so very complex. I just don't like how our society has romanticized this story so much to the point it loses its original meaning. Romeo is supposed to be this emo, annoying teenager who is WAY TOO RASH (I MEAN, JUST TAKE A SECOND TO THINK FOR ONCE, ROMEO. YOU EGG.). He's not supposed to be the ever enchanting Leo. The whole play is about the lack of knowledge (irony). If everyone in the play took a hot second to think critically, everything would be solved. Pretty much. Also, teach people how to read. That will help too. Anyway, I liked how this play doesn't romanticize this story. It shows it as is, and Romeo is as annoying as ever. Highly recommend.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rakisha

    “Two households, both alike in dignity In fear Verona, where we lay our scene From ancient grudge Break to new mutiny Where civil blood makes Civil hands unclean. From forth the fatal loins of these two foes, A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life….” Blah, blah, blah, blahbly blah…thus is the opening to one of history’s most well-known tragedies that has spawned hundreds of years’ worth of tropes—Tony & Maria (West Side Story), Jack & Rose (Titanic), Buffy & Angel (Buffy the Vampire “Two households, both alike in dignity In fear Verona, where we lay our scene From ancient grudge Break to new mutiny Where civil blood makes Civil hands unclean. From forth the fatal loins of these two foes, A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life….” Blah, blah, blah, blahbly blah…thus is the opening to one of history’s most well-known tragedies that has spawned hundreds of years’ worth of tropes—Tony & Maria (West Side Story), Jack & Rose (Titanic), Buffy & Angel (Buffy the Vampire Slayer). It’s a story line we know well. It’s a story line that everyone knows so well. So what makes Gareth Hinds version worth picking up and reading? First off, it is a graphic novel. I didn’t realize how much easier it was to understand the anger, the humor, and all of the emotion in Shakespeare’s words until I could match it with still illustration. Sure, seeing a movie version or a play helps but actors move around. You don’t get to linger on their faces or the expressions. Gareth Hinds’ Rome & Juliet allows the reader to do that. And even with all that time given to linger, concentrate and re-read, the story didn’t lose the gut punch reaction. When Juliet stabbed herself…sheesh! Secondly, Hinds tried very hard to keep to the iambic pentameter of Shakespeare’s dialogue intact. Now, I can hardly pronounce it and much less explain what it is. But if I understood correctly from Hinds’ foreword, reading the dialogue in this pattern helps the reader appreciate Shakespeare’s “genius.” I do have to agree that this iambic pentameter did make it easier to understand the bantering between characters. Finally, Gareth Hinds painted this universal story with a multiracial cast. Although he claims it is not a statement about racism or racial conflict, I admit that it was fun to see Romeo rocking the baby dreadlocks—definitely more appealing to the diverse tween and teen patrons that attend my urban public library. So, if you want to recommend an accessible but accurate version of Romeo & Juliet, do recommend Romeo & Juliet adapted by Gareth Hinds.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    This text is a great accompaniment to the real thing. I really like that R+J are depicted as an interracial couple; this representation opens a lot of doors to discussion about stigma, racism, politics, and conflict. The slanted gutters emphasize the increasing chaos as the play progresses. And the visual characterizations really helped me to keep all of the men straight- especially Paris, Tybalt, Mercutio, Benvolio, etc. Overall, a great read!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    I think I would have liked this adaptation a lot better if Hinds had been able to settle on either a modern or period setting for his graphic novel. I do like how he made the story more diverse than in the original play, by casting the Montagues as black and the Capulets as Indian. That was, I think, the one nice touch he brought to his adaptation. From there, he went with an odd and unsettling mix of period accurate and modern details. Picture Tybalt shirtless, tattooed, and with a modern hairs I think I would have liked this adaptation a lot better if Hinds had been able to settle on either a modern or period setting for his graphic novel. I do like how he made the story more diverse than in the original play, by casting the Montagues as black and the Capulets as Indian. That was, I think, the one nice touch he brought to his adaptation. From there, he went with an odd and unsettling mix of period accurate and modern details. Picture Tybalt shirtless, tattooed, and with a modern hairstyle, but wearing 16th century breeches. Picture Juliet wearing a dress that is, from the waist up, a plain but serviceable Renaissance gown, and a skirt that ends above the knee. It's weird and a little jarring, and I wish Hinds had either stayed strictly period of strictly modern. This probably bothers me a lot more than it will most people. But I'm sure that I'm far from the only one who will notice how infuriatingly inconsistent the art quality is. Some of the panels are very nice, even lovely, and some are rushed and look like Hinds couldn't be bothered with them.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kara

    This version is absolutely faithful to the text, while experimenting with a very different set of visuals. In this version, the Montagues are from Africa and the Capulets are from India, both families now living in a Verona filled with a diverse cast hailing from all ends of the Earth, and the younger generation firmly rejecting the stuffiness of the older generation’s Elizabethan fashion. The setting was beautiful and paired beautifully with the text, for example, at the beginning the introducti This version is absolutely faithful to the text, while experimenting with a very different set of visuals. In this version, the Montagues are from Africa and the Capulets are from India, both families now living in a Verona filled with a diverse cast hailing from all ends of the Earth, and the younger generation firmly rejecting the stuffiness of the older generation’s Elizabethan fashion. The setting was beautiful and paired beautifully with the text, for example, at the beginning the introduction text rolls over a graveyard, reminding you right at the start this is a tragedy. The characters themselves were drawn somewhat stilted, but high marks for the amount of research and thought that went into every single panel.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Juliette Simpson

    Romeo and Juliet by Gareth Hinds is a graphic novel as a take on the original Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. As a Capulet Juliet could not interfere with a Montague. One night the Capulet family holds a party. A Montague named Romeo attends the party and both Romeo and Juliet fall in love. Through secret meetings Romeo and Juliet's love grows. Of course, there are differences in the family's relationship. I liked this book a lot. Our of five, i only gave it a three because i wasn't quite able to Romeo and Juliet by Gareth Hinds is a graphic novel as a take on the original Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. As a Capulet Juliet could not interfere with a Montague. One night the Capulet family holds a party. A Montague named Romeo attends the party and both Romeo and Juliet fall in love. Through secret meetings Romeo and Juliet's love grows. Of course, there are differences in the family's relationship. I liked this book a lot. Our of five, i only gave it a three because i wasn't quite able to understand how they talked. But, I do recommend this book to anybody who likes Shakespeare plays.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bill Liu

    Romeo and Juliet by Gareth Hinds this book turn the famous opera into a Graphic novel it is talking about inalong ago there is two noble they become enemy of each other but the son and daughter named Romeo and Juliet fell in love But young Romeo kill a guy in Juliet’s noble and Juliet is going to marry another man so she drink a kind of Potions and act like she is died but Romeo saw think she is dead and kill him self beside Juliet .and Juliet wake up and saw Romeo she suicide。it is a very sad st Romeo and Juliet by Gareth Hinds this book turn the famous opera into a Graphic novel it is talking about inalong ago there is two noble they become enemy of each other but the son and daughter named Romeo and Juliet fell in love But young Romeo kill a guy in Juliet’s noble and Juliet is going to marry another man so she drink a kind of Potions and act like she is died but Romeo saw think she is dead and kill him self beside Juliet .and Juliet wake up and saw Romeo she suicide。it is a very sad story

  10. 4 out of 5

    Scott Hayden

    So glad Mrs. Becky has brought graphic novels of Shakespeare into the library. This edition maintains Shakespeare's language, but with almost no footnotes or explanations, makes the story and dialogue followable. Even my 6-year-old spent time gazing at the pictures. "Daddy, their fighting with swords and killing each other," she informed me matter-of-factly. The illustrations are not so graphic as to be disturbing.

  11. 4 out of 5

    David

    This book is talk about one country, have red, bile, and perpur three little country, one day, the red country and blue country fits, and the blue country one boy love one for blue country girl, so it want be together, so them want the two country reconcile but the two country don’t agreat so the grip kill herself and the boy do the same.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay C-T

    Same ol' story about absurdly dramatic teens, but this time with lovely pics and some diversity! Oh, and a lot of the pointless monologues were condensed, which I appreciated. Love it! Review: https://untamedshrews.wordpress.com/2...

  13. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    I thought the story was very well told. However, I wasn't impressed with the art. The layout was functional and clear, but uninspired. The illustrations remind me of the illustrations in my middle school life skills work book. That's not a good thing.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lulu (the library leopard)

    Well, that was MUCH easier to understand than straight-up reading a script.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tony

    A man and a woman in a dance party love other side,they kiss other side.One day the man die,the woman kill too.This story tell us love is great.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rich in Color

    Review Copy: Local library When I saw the cover, I wondered what angle Gareth Hinds had as he crafted this adaptation. Was this going to be a West Side Story type? Hinds definitely meddled with the culture of the Montagues and Capulets, but otherwise, he left things alone for the most part. Other than omitting lines, Hinds stayed close to the original text and he kept the setting in historical Verona. He explains at the beginning in a note to the reader, “I chose to cast my retelling of Romeo &a Review Copy: Local library When I saw the cover, I wondered what angle Gareth Hinds had as he crafted this adaptation. Was this going to be a West Side Story type? Hinds definitely meddled with the culture of the Montagues and Capulets, but otherwise, he left things alone for the most part. Other than omitting lines, Hinds stayed close to the original text and he kept the setting in historical Verona. He explains at the beginning in a note to the reader, “I chose to cast my retelling of Romeo & Juliet with multiracial characters in order to reflect how universal this story is. It is not a statement about racism or racial conflict.” There is no alteration to the storyline as a result of this cosmetic change. If you could not see the illustrations and only heard the text, you would have no idea that Juliet’s family is Indian. It made me wonder if this graphic novel could ever be made into an audio book because the pictures add so much to this adaptation. The illustrations allowed for a bit more personality to be shown with the characters and of course inserted cultural identifiers. It also allowed me to keep the names straight from the very beginning since the cast of characters included pictures. I have read Romeo and Juliet at least five times as a play for classes or for fun. What I loved immediately was the novelty of reading this story as something other than a script. With the illustrations, stage directions are unnecessary and names aren’t required along with every bit of the dialogue. The text flows more easily this way. He also kept the clothing of the families color coded. The Montagues are wearing shades of blue and the Capulets are in various shades of orange. This made the relationships easier to follow especially during the action scenes. The graphic novel format is one step closer to seeing the play acted out. This adaptation will be very accessible for the reluctant Shakespeare reader whether they are a young adult or a not so young adult. As Hinds pointed out, he wanted to show that this is a story that transcends cultures. Star-crossed lovers can be found anywhere and anytime. Mixing up the culture a bit certainly does help demonstrate that everyman quality. I wasn’t sure how to take that though. It seems to be an example of the “casual diversity” that Betsy Bird spoke of recently. It’s not an issue in the story, it just exists. But it makes me wonder. Are cultures that easy to swap out and should they be? In this instance, as an illustrator he is adding diversity to a text that he didn’t want to alter. It also reinforces his theory that this tragedy could happen to anyone regardless of religious background, skin color, culture or age. For Romeo’s family, skin tone and hair styles were basically the only racial or cultural markers. They appeared to be of African descent. What I appreciated was that Hinds did not have everyone in the family look pretty much the same. There is a wide variety of body types, faces, and hairstyles. He provided diversity within the culture. With Juliet’s family, Hinds included a few more clues beyond skin tone and facial features, but this was mainly in the area of clothing. The most obvious being that Capulet wears a Sikh turban and Lady Capulet has a head scarf, but there were others. The only truly jarring note was the mishmash of modern and older dress. The younger characters like Juliet were sometimes in more contemporary clothing like her short skirt. It would jerk me out of the story more than any of the other things that were going on in the illustrations. That the time periods of the costumes were not matching was a bit disconcerting. It didn’t stop me from enjoying the story though. Overall, the illustrations were rich and truly brought out the emotions of the story. I know that I would have loved to have this as an option when I was first reading Shakespeare as a teen. It will likely draw new readers to Shakespeare. My Recommendation: If you are a graphic novel or Shakespeare fan, I would get this one soon. Otherwise, I would still recommend that you check it out sometime. It is a gorgeous way to experience Romeo & Juliet. Original review posted at Rich in Color http://richincolor.com/2014/02/review...

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ashly Lynn

    This is a graphic novel based on William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. Hinds mixes up the story a bit to emphasize how universal Shakespeare’s idea was by making the two feuding families different races: African American and Indian. Hinds brings Shakespeare’s story to life through illustrations that make the themes and occurrences of the story come to life before your eyes. I don’t think I need to explain the plot further; we’re all familiar with the story of Romeo and Juliet, right? I found th This is a graphic novel based on William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. Hinds mixes up the story a bit to emphasize how universal Shakespeare’s idea was by making the two feuding families different races: African American and Indian. Hinds brings Shakespeare’s story to life through illustrations that make the themes and occurrences of the story come to life before your eyes. I don’t think I need to explain the plot further; we’re all familiar with the story of Romeo and Juliet, right? I found this book at the Library and was pretty excited, since I’m a huge Shakespeare fan and also a huge graphic novel fan (as you’ve all probably noticed), so combining the two seemed like a fantastic idea. However, I was completely disappointed with this book and found it to be a waste of time (even if it was a quick read). First off, the only positive thing I felt about this book: I really liked that Hinds took a risk and mixed up the races of the characters. I thought that was a super cool idea and made this book utterly unique in at least one aspect. I thought for sure it was an idea I was going to like. But, I don’t think it fit well with the story. Since Hinds had already mixed up the concept of Romeo and Juliet and race, I thought he honestly could have written a completely fresh story. Romeo and Juliet has been told a million times. I was hoping for something with more of a fresh twist. I also felt that Hinds doesn’t fully understand what Shakespeare was trying to get across with his original play. I have studied and read most of Shakespeare’s works, most of them more than once, and to say I’m a fan would be an understatement. So, I felt like Hinds was grasping at straws and had removed much of the main message that Romeo and Juliet sends. He left the text in Shakespeare’s original iambic pentameter writing and, by doing so, I feel like he cut out so many of the funny bits (because Romeo and Juliet is actually satire and contains so many laugh out loud moments), so that was a big let down. I don’t think leaving this text in iambic pentameter was Hinds best choice, especially because it slowed the pace and was hard to follow with so much of the original text cut out. I totally understand why a lot of the sexual jokes were cut out since this is marketed towards young adults, but by cutting out most of these scenes in their entirety doesn’t make the story easier to follow; it makes it harder. Plus, he cut out way more than just the sexual bits. Too much. I also wasn’t a huge fan of the setting being left in Verona (although the illustrations made me a bit reminiscent of Verona since I was just there last summer – it was super overrated). Since he changed the races of the characters, it would have been totally fun to mix up the setting as well, which would have shown even more how universal the story was since it would show that it could happen anywhere. Hinds really didn’t think this through. It also came across that Hinds didn’t know that Shakespeare never actually went to Verona – He never left England, actually. He had no idea what his settings around Europe looked like in real life. He was a poor man and only knew what he saw and heard from his inner London circle. I read Hinds author’s note at the back of the book and it came across as very uninformed. I don’t know, I just feel like Hinds could have done so much more with this. The possibilities were endless. I wanted this book to be so much more than just another bland retelling of a story that’s already been retold too many times. Or, maybe I’m just too much of a Shakespeare nerd. All in all, though, my final verdict is that I wouldn’t recommend this book to anyone. It was bland, irritating, and boring. Plus, it was hard to follow and lacked so much of the original story that it didn’t come together for me at all. I found myself just aching to finish this to be done instead of actually wanting to finish it because I enjoyed it. This book was meh. Don’t waste your time on it, honestly.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tara Schuhmacher

    I really enjoyed reading this retelling of the famous story. I enjoyed the combinations of illustrations with the (mostly) original lines. The story, though, while having some good things to think deeply about, is still sad and maddening.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jeanie

    Romeo and Juliet adapted and illustrated by Gareth Hinds GRAPHIC NOVEL CATEGORY This book is everything you would expect it to be: Shakespeare’s play shortened and adapted for a young adult audience, told in a comic book-style way. Something I appreciated about Hinds adaptation is that he was careful to include all of the more famous lines in the play that are bandied about in societal conversations. When youth read it they will aha moments of “oh, this is where that saying comes from” which will Romeo and Juliet adapted and illustrated by Gareth Hinds GRAPHIC NOVEL CATEGORY This book is everything you would expect it to be: Shakespeare’s play shortened and adapted for a young adult audience, told in a comic book-style way. Something I appreciated about Hinds adaptation is that he was careful to include all of the more famous lines in the play that are bandied about in societal conversations. When youth read it they will aha moments of “oh, this is where that saying comes from” which will incentivize them to read and learn further. Also, the drawings were strategically done for easy following of the story. All of the Montague characters are depicted in blue attire, whereas the Capulets are drawn in red. Hind states at the beginning that all of the characters are multiracial because he wanted to “reflect how universal this story is.” Lastly, he points out the iambic pentameter that Shakespeare brilliantly uses and encourages readers to read the dialogue in that way. This serves to not only assure readers of a more pleasant reading experience, but also teaches them about different meters used in great works of literature. I’m personally not a huge fan of the graphic novel genre, but appreciated all that Hind brought to it. Also, it wasn’t a particular enjoyable read for me, given how familiar the storyline is. Younger adolescence, however, would benefit from this easy introduction into canonized work.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lydia

    So I wanted to give this four stars, but the Shakespeareian reader in me wouldn't let me for one simple reason: this is a serious Romeo and Juliet. The original play reads much like one of Shakespeare's comedies until the final act and (most likely due to "time" and space constraints) none of the comedic elements have been carried over to this graphic novel. Which makes complete sense if you are reading this like a teenager (who would take the romance of a 14 year old and a 16 year old as life a So I wanted to give this four stars, but the Shakespeareian reader in me wouldn't let me for one simple reason: this is a serious Romeo and Juliet. The original play reads much like one of Shakespeare's comedies until the final act and (most likely due to "time" and space constraints) none of the comedic elements have been carried over to this graphic novel. Which makes complete sense if you are reading this like a teenager (who would take the romance of a 14 year old and a 16 year old as life and death drama), but not if you are reading it like a mature reader who sees the over-exuberance of these two youngsters and their penchant for drama. To be fair though, for the tale it tells, this book tells it beautifully! The graphics are lovely and the international flair works very well (though it almost seems like we're getting two Shakespeare's for the price of one!). Content notes: No language issues (there is some bawdy talk, not nearly as much as the original, but it's not very obvious). Sensuality wise, after their marriage, Romeo and Juliet do spend the night together, but other than kissing nothing else is shown. (Also, the aforementioned bawdy language, but that is mostly just one early scene.) Violence is present in swords and poison form; generally, mortal wounds are shown as a sword/dagger in a persons chest with blood leaking out around their body.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sandy Brehl

    I've seen the movie, the play, West Side Story, high school productions, and read the original (and the Cliff's Notes). This graphic novel adaptation is, too me, the best possible version for young readers to appreciate both the intricate language and the nuanced drama of Shakespeare's timeless ROMEO AND JULIET. The graphic format itself demands engagement, and Hinds allows every reader to identify by presenting a multitude of ethnicities within the classic time and place of the original story. I've seen the movie, the play, West Side Story, high school productions, and read the original (and the Cliff's Notes). This graphic novel adaptation is, too me, the best possible version for young readers to appreciate both the intricate language and the nuanced drama of Shakespeare's timeless ROMEO AND JULIET. The graphic format itself demands engagement, and Hinds allows every reader to identify by presenting a multitude of ethnicities within the classic time and place of the original story. He provides a brief author note to address this: "I chose to cast my retelling of Romeo and Juliet with multiracial characters to reflect how universal this story is. It is not a statement about racism or racial conflict." He also maintains iambic pentameter meter even when occasionally adapting language. Where some complex puns and word choice could confuse, he simply provides an asterisk and short explanation on the bottom of the page. Hinds has produced numerous graphic novel adaptations that strike a brilliant balance between authenticity and accessibility. They make classics relevant, even enticing curious readers to pursue the original works. For those whose only encounter with these works is within the pages of this graphic novel, the experience will be positive, memorable, and worth talking about. Shakespeare would be pleased.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    This gorgeously illustrated, full-color graphic novel offers an abridgement of Shakespeare's original text, with some lines additionally altered for comprehension. As described in the afterword, Hinds did extensive research on historic Verona and thought through his locations both in terms of architecture and proximity to the original structures. He didn't stick as close to history with his characters, though, choosing to make his cast multicultural. The Capulets are Indian, and the Montagues Af This gorgeously illustrated, full-color graphic novel offers an abridgement of Shakespeare's original text, with some lines additionally altered for comprehension. As described in the afterword, Hinds did extensive research on historic Verona and thought through his locations both in terms of architecture and proximity to the original structures. He didn't stick as close to history with his characters, though, choosing to make his cast multicultural. The Capulets are Indian, and the Montagues African, and other characters are a mix of many races. Their costume is mostly traditional period, but with some changes for the younger members (Juliet wears a knee-length dress to the ball, with low heeled boots, and Tybalt struts around bare-chested and covered with tattoos, for example), and to represent the race's history (a Sikh headdress for Lord Capulet, i.e.). The colors are strong but translucent, with a watercolor feel, outlined and defined in black. Characters are distinct and expressive, and action is energetic but still comprehensible. Hinds uses a variety of page layouts, but keeps the frames distinct, outlined in black and separated by white space. The Montagues all wear shades of blue (with a little violet), and the Capulets wear shades of red and orange. The violence is kept to a minimum and there's no fanservice, so this is fine for middle school.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Payne

    GRAPHIC NOVEL This was an interesting twist on "Romeo and Juliet", but I think one that YA readers might like. For the most part, it stays pretty true to the original Shakespeare text--I think there might be a couple of tiny adjustments. But, it still gives readers the Shakespeare experience for sure. One thing that I liked that made the book less distracting than reading a traditional Shakespeare play version of Romeo and Juliet was that instead of having the names before lines (for example, "Ro GRAPHIC NOVEL This was an interesting twist on "Romeo and Juliet", but I think one that YA readers might like. For the most part, it stays pretty true to the original Shakespeare text--I think there might be a couple of tiny adjustments. But, it still gives readers the Shakespeare experience for sure. One thing that I liked that made the book less distracting than reading a traditional Shakespeare play version of Romeo and Juliet was that instead of having the names before lines (for example, "Romeo: She speaks, O speak again, bright angel! Juliet: O Romeo, Romeo wherefore art thou Romeo!"), it reads like any graphic novel and there are just speech bubbles above each character with their lines. The one downside to this, though, was that at the beginning, I sometimes got confused about who was saying what because I hadn't remembered what all of the characters looked like yet (they aren't labeled in the book). I also liked that the author made the characters multi-cultural. It really is a universal story and I think that that is something a lot of students would find intriguing and relatable. This was actually my first graphic novel, and having read a traditional version of "Romeo and Juliet", it was pretty cool to see what a difference this genre can make for the story.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Becky B

    Gareth Hinds retells Shakespeare's classic in graphic novel form using Shakespeare's own words. The text has been a tiny bit abridged, though for the most part it reads just like the original. (Yes, including some of the old, old words, but there are asterisks beside confusing words and definitions at the bottom of the page.) Hinds has chosen to illustrate the play with a multicultural cast, which I really liked. I think my students will love it, being that this is an international school and th Gareth Hinds retells Shakespeare's classic in graphic novel form using Shakespeare's own words. The text has been a tiny bit abridged, though for the most part it reads just like the original. (Yes, including some of the old, old words, but there are asterisks beside confusing words and definitions at the bottom of the page.) Hinds has chosen to illustrate the play with a multicultural cast, which I really liked. I think my students will love it, being that this is an international school and they themselves are quite multicultural. The illustrations should help them navigate some of the more sloggish points of archaic language, making this a much more approachable version than any of the text only editions. Notes on content: Archaic language, which includes some slurs the students will entirely miss and some language relatively inane in Shakespeare's time which is a little more controversial today. No sexual content beyond a kiss portrayed. And the illustrations are all decent. True to the traditional costumes, some of the women show a little cleavage, but nothing beyond that. The swordfights are included, but are kept relatively clean. The stabbings are illustrated with blood stains on clothing or the ground, but that's all that is shown.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    A few disclaimers: Romeo and Juliet is NOT my favorite Shakespeare. Even so, I know it fairly well. I love the idea of graphic novels as a way to introduce difficult classic works of literature to a younger generation. As a way to provide a visual for readers and an understanding of the story before tackling the full work, it is brilliant, and especially useful, I think for plays and poetry, which are often quite visual, yet reduced to text. In this, Hinds' Romeo and Juliet excels. He does an exc A few disclaimers: Romeo and Juliet is NOT my favorite Shakespeare. Even so, I know it fairly well. I love the idea of graphic novels as a way to introduce difficult classic works of literature to a younger generation. As a way to provide a visual for readers and an understanding of the story before tackling the full work, it is brilliant, and especially useful, I think for plays and poetry, which are often quite visual, yet reduced to text. In this, Hinds' Romeo and Juliet excels. He does an excellent job of interpreting and displaying the text in graphic novel form. I as a reader, though, appreciate the depth and insight that graphic novels can add to a text, and this felt lacking to me. The diversity and inclusion of modern aspects to an otherwise historic scene were good, but after these effects were noted, I didn't feel there was anything new or engaging here beyond the text. I was particularly disappointed by Mercutio's Queen Mab speech, but I was highly impressed by that scene in Baz Luhrman's production, so my opinion may be unjustly biased. This was good, but not nearly as dear to me as his Odyssey.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ariel Caldwell

    Surprisingly good! The cover and artwork looked better than the average "graphic novel of Important Literary Work for high schoolers who can't fathom the actual text", and I was suitably impressed throughout. I really appreciated the rich colours and vibrant panels. The note at the end explains exactly where and why Hinds chose those spots, too - added veracity I never suspected as I read. I knew I was in good hands when I saw the brief note to the reader. Hinds notes at the beginning that he's c Surprisingly good! The cover and artwork looked better than the average "graphic novel of Important Literary Work for high schoolers who can't fathom the actual text", and I was suitably impressed throughout. I really appreciated the rich colours and vibrant panels. The note at the end explains exactly where and why Hinds chose those spots, too - added veracity I never suspected as I read. I knew I was in good hands when I saw the brief note to the reader. Hinds notes at the beginning that he's cast the play "with multiracial characters in order to reflect how universal the story is," and kept the iambic pentameter (and explained it "that each line goes da dum, da dum, da dum, da dum, da dum.") The visual representation, and unified visual theme for each family, really helped me see the story in a new way. Hinds took care with the text and illustrations (e.g. the balcony scene, in which Romeo can't actually reach Juliet because in the next scene, Nurse has to get rope so he can climb up for the sleepover). I'd recommend this for graphic novel lovers, as well as students who have to slog through the text for class.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Marta Boksenbaum

    Yes, yet another take on Romeo and Juliet. Sigh. Or not? I thought this graphic take on my least favorite Shakespeare actually did a wonderful job with this classic tale. Romeo and Juliet in graphic form do away with the need for stage directions or descriptions of emotions. The illustrations give the reader the facial expressions and depictions of the action that are missing from the published play normally read by high schoolers. The multicultural couple is an interesting addition to this inte Yes, yet another take on Romeo and Juliet. Sigh. Or not? I thought this graphic take on my least favorite Shakespeare actually did a wonderful job with this classic tale. Romeo and Juliet in graphic form do away with the need for stage directions or descriptions of emotions. The illustrations give the reader the facial expressions and depictions of the action that are missing from the published play normally read by high schoolers. The multicultural couple is an interesting addition to this interpretation, which adds reason to the conflict and heightens the stakes between Capulet and Montague. However, although this graphic novel is beautiful and interesting, the play still has a great amount of words, and I did get bogged down about two-thirds of the way through. Overall, if I was a high school teacher, I would allow this as research material for whatever assignment I asked the students to complete. It is really quite impressive.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Roy

    I think this is a great adaptation of the play, and does a great job of translating it into the graphic novel format. _Romeo & Juliet_ is my least favorite of Shakespeare's plays, but the play itself is a great primer for those who will later read more complex and "better" of his plays. Putting the story into a graphic novel makes it even more accessible to Shakespearean novices. I gave 4, rather than 5, stars because of the omission of two of what I see as the best parts of the play. First, I think this is a great adaptation of the play, and does a great job of translating it into the graphic novel format. _Romeo & Juliet_ is my least favorite of Shakespeare's plays, but the play itself is a great primer for those who will later read more complex and "better" of his plays. Putting the story into a graphic novel makes it even more accessible to Shakespearean novices. I gave 4, rather than 5, stars because of the omission of two of what I see as the best parts of the play. First, by omitting many of the nurse's lines, she becomes just another extra character, rather than a prime example of Comic Relief. Second, by reducing the scenes where Juliet interacts with her mother--particularly the conversation after Romeo is banished, where everything Juliet says has a double-meaning--we miss much of what there is to like about Juliet. Without those flashes of intelligence, Juliet is reduced to another stupid love-struck teenage girl.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Reed

    While I enjoyed the diversity of the cast, I felt the author walked a very strange line between modern and "traditional". Rather than the women in the party scene's knee-length skirts being charming, novel, or even risque, it was strange. Rather than Tybalt's tattoos underscoring his personality, I spent my time wondering where the heck his his shirt was. Putting creative choices/details with the very-traditional text and the very-traditional setting and the very-traditional except-for-a-few-sid While I enjoyed the diversity of the cast, I felt the author walked a very strange line between modern and "traditional". Rather than the women in the party scene's knee-length skirts being charming, novel, or even risque, it was strange. Rather than Tybalt's tattoos underscoring his personality, I spent my time wondering where the heck his his shirt was. Putting creative choices/details with the very-traditional text and the very-traditional setting and the very-traditional except-for-a-few-sideways-details did not work. I read the first two chapters, skimmed the rest of the book, and then returned it. Though he made some very interesting and novel decisions, the way Hinds decided to walk the line was both too much and not enough, and affected the coherency of the story.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Aerion

    I read R&J in high school and every part of that play went completely over my head. Plays are meant to be seen and visualized, and reading it as a play does not do it justice. So to see the scenes in this play, unfortunately not in its entirety, still registers more than reading just the text of the play. The pictures in this novel are vibrant, and I could really feel the intensity of the characters, especially the pain and suffering of Juliet in the closing pages. I would definitely recomme I read R&J in high school and every part of that play went completely over my head. Plays are meant to be seen and visualized, and reading it as a play does not do it justice. So to see the scenes in this play, unfortunately not in its entirety, still registers more than reading just the text of the play. The pictures in this novel are vibrant, and I could really feel the intensity of the characters, especially the pain and suffering of Juliet in the closing pages. I would definitely recommend this to anyone interested in Shakespeare but sort of a beginner to his work, like myself. I can really appreciate Hinds effort to not change the words of the characters also. It made it still feel authentic and not broken down like Shakespeare For Dummies

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