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A Wolf Called Romeo PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: A Wolf Called Romeo
Author: Nick Jans
Publisher: Published July 1st 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (first published 2014)
ISBN: 9780547858197
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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The unlikely true story of a six-year friendship between a wild, oddly gentle black wolf and the people and dogs of Juneau, Alaska  No stranger to wildlife, Nick Jans had lived in Alaska for nearly thirty years. But when one evening at twilight a lone black wolf ambled into view not far from his doorstep, Nick would finally come to know this mystical species—up close as ne The unlikely true story of a six-year friendship between a wild, oddly gentle black wolf and the people and dogs of Juneau, Alaska  No stranger to wildlife, Nick Jans had lived in Alaska for nearly thirty years. But when one evening at twilight a lone black wolf ambled into view not far from his doorstep, Nick would finally come to know this mystical species—up close as never before. A Wolf Called Romeo is the remarkable story of a wolf who returned again and again to interact with the people and dogs of Juneau, living on the edges of their community, engaging in an improbable, awe-inspiring interspecies dance and bringing the wild into sharp focus. At first the people of Juneau were guarded, torn between shoot first, ask questions later instincts and curiosity. But as Romeo began to tag along with cross-country skiers on their daily jaunts, play fetch with local dogs, or simply lie near Nick and nap under the sun, they came to accept Romeo, and he them. For Nick it was about trying to understand Romeo, then it was about winning his trust, and ultimately it was about watching over him, for as long as he or anyone could. Written with a deft hand and a searching heart, A Wolf Called Romeo is an unforgettable tale of a creature who defied nature and thus gave humans a chance to understand it a little more.    

30 review for A Wolf Called Romeo

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sherry

    I may be biased because I was able to play on the lake with my dog Rusty and the enigmatic Wolf Called Romeo. Nick Jan's wrote an authentic account of a time in Juneau that really did bring people together. After finishing this book I got to thinking how Nick Jans has immortalized a bit of nature history and has written such a descriptive account of this time, that even if you didn't live in Juneau during this time, you could experience the magic. I miss Romeo!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Seal

    A profoundly moving and enlightening book about a wolf that appeared out of the woods one day to accompany the author on his daily ski near Juneau, Alaska. Soon it was evident that this wolf, with no mate or pack of his own, enjoyed the company of several other locals, and particularly liked to play with their pet dogs. The town was soon divided into those who thought the only good wolf was a dead wolf, and those who felt touched and inspired by being allowed to share the company of a wild anima A profoundly moving and enlightening book about a wolf that appeared out of the woods one day to accompany the author on his daily ski near Juneau, Alaska. Soon it was evident that this wolf, with no mate or pack of his own, enjoyed the company of several other locals, and particularly liked to play with their pet dogs. The town was soon divided into those who thought the only good wolf was a dead wolf, and those who felt touched and inspired by being allowed to share the company of a wild animal - by that animal's own free will. Part memoir and part natural history, the author provides an educated portrait of a unique and mysterious personality, yet manages to treat the highly emotional issue of wildlife control in a balanced and professional manner. Romeo interacted with the residents and pets of Juneau for several years, becoming something of a town mascot, unaware of the tightrope he was walking simply to remain alive. I would recommend this book to anyone who has a heart. Even teens who've tired of zombies and the apocalypse. Beautifully written.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bobby

    A Wolf Called Romeo tells the one-of-a-kind story of a lone black wolf - a wild wolf - who became a fixture in Juneau, AK over the course of several years. During the time that Romeo spent near the Mendenhall glacier many of the people there, and their dogs, witnessed a wild wolf who was non-threatening to humans and seemed to relish the opportunity to play with the local dogs, something he did daily as townsfolk came to witness this "friendly" wolf. Jans tells the story in an almost conversatio A Wolf Called Romeo tells the one-of-a-kind story of a lone black wolf - a wild wolf - who became a fixture in Juneau, AK over the course of several years. During the time that Romeo spent near the Mendenhall glacier many of the people there, and their dogs, witnessed a wild wolf who was non-threatening to humans and seemed to relish the opportunity to play with the local dogs, something he did daily as townsfolk came to witness this "friendly" wolf. Jans tells the story in an almost conversational manner coupled with insight into wolves, what it means to be "wild," humans, and how the two relate. The story is a powerful one that Jans relates so well that I found myself compelled to get back to it and to finish it as soon as possible. This is the kind of story that will stay with you well after you've read it. Haunting, compelling, very well done, and highly recommended!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Carl Safina

    A surprisingly good book; surprising because it’s titled A Wolf Called Romeo and it’s written in an initially offputtingly breezy style. But it’s loaded with facts about wolves that quite accurately sum up a lot of the science that I recently learned while writing my own book which has a long consideration of wolves (Beyond Words; What Animals Think and Feel). For 6 years in the early 2000s, a wild wolf cavorted with humans and their dogs just outside Juneau, Alaska. As you'd expect--or maybe th A surprisingly good book; surprising because it’s titled A Wolf Called Romeo and it’s written in an initially offputtingly breezy style. But it’s loaded with facts about wolves that quite accurately sum up a lot of the science that I recently learned while writing my own book which has a long consideration of wolves (Beyond Words; What Animals Think and Feel). For 6 years in the early 2000s, a wild wolf cavorted with humans and their dogs just outside Juneau, Alaska. As you'd expect--or maybe the opposite of what you'd expect--the wolf acted better than the people.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jim Misko

    A Wolf Called Romeo, is an emotional roller-coaster. Up, when author Nick Jans is interacting with the wolf or discussing others who formed a tight relationship, and down when the scientific and legal interludes cool his fine narrative. There are comfortable level portions that are informative, and allow a reader to rest his heart rate until it comes back to walking, talking, and interacting with the wolf called Romeo. In Alaska we often get opportunities to interact with wild creatures, but thi A Wolf Called Romeo, is an emotional roller-coaster. Up, when author Nick Jans is interacting with the wolf or discussing others who formed a tight relationship, and down when the scientific and legal interludes cool his fine narrative. There are comfortable level portions that are informative, and allow a reader to rest his heart rate until it comes back to walking, talking, and interacting with the wolf called Romeo. In Alaska we often get opportunities to interact with wild creatures, but this long lasting intimate, tolerable affair far surpassed an occasional relationship. Plus—this book is a work of beauty. Get it. Read it. Don’t loan it out unless you keep the dust cover in the cupboard while it’s gone.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chris Craddock

    Who's Afraid of Alaska Woolf? Nick Jans was a hunter and a wilderness guide who hunted alongside Native Alaskan tribes, but he lost his bloodlust and traded his knife and rifle in for a pen and a camera. Living in Juneau, with a glacier practically thawing in his backyard he and his dogs encountered the wolf that would come to be known as Romeo. He was a lone wolf, not a member of a wolf pack. Still, he seemed to be not only surviving on his own, but healthy and thriving. Only one piece was missi Who's Afraid of Alaska Woolf? Nick Jans was a hunter and a wilderness guide who hunted alongside Native Alaskan tribes, but he lost his bloodlust and traded his knife and rifle in for a pen and a camera. Living in Juneau, with a glacier practically thawing in his backyard he and his dogs encountered the wolf that would come to be known as Romeo. He was a lone wolf, not a member of a wolf pack. Still, he seemed to be not only surviving on his own, but healthy and thriving. Only one piece was missing from his puzzle: This Romeo lacked a Juliet. He was a lone wolf, but also a lonely wolf. He sought companionship in the strangest places: the dogs of some lucky Juneau residents, and by proxy, their owners. Besides Jans, his wife and their dogs, two other groups formed the strongest bond with Romeo: Hyde, a photographer, and his dog; and Britain, a dog and her owner. Many other Juneauites and tourists were also able to get close to Romeo. There is always a chance for catastrophe when wild animals encounter humans, but for quite some time disaster was averted. Though Nick Jans is biased to the extreme towards Romeo, he offers plenty of evidence to support his version of events. At one point a beagle named Tank chases after Romeo and disappears, but though the dog's bereaved owner is certain Romeo is to blame, Jans offers alternate scenarios, or at the very least, mitigating circumstances. Other close calls with Pugs and Pomeranians were shrugged off. Meanwhile Romeo is described as all but walking on water--strike that. He is shown literally walking on water. The lake is still frozen over but water from melting glaciers is flowing over it at a depth of a few feet allowing Romeo to "walk on water." This is described as a miracle along with the miracle of Romeo surviving as long as he does, and returning to the place season after season where he is so revered. Though Nick Jans is definitely a partisan in favor of Romeo in particular, and wolves and wildlife in general, he states a compelling case, and I tend to agree with his verdicts. The bottom line is that A Wolf Called Romeo is an enjoyable and inspiring book that will have you howling at the moon.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Spenser

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I thought this book was a nice story of a remarkable animal, who lived a great life that ended too soon. I am also happy that Romeo's story is out there for everyone to hear. However, It's tragic that his killers did what they did and got away with it. Being a lawyer (jd cadidate as of this writing) it is sad someone didn't step in as an advocate for the wolf and use back channels like Romeo's killer's lawyer did. I wish they could still do something, but at least its consolation that both of th I thought this book was a nice story of a remarkable animal, who lived a great life that ended too soon. I am also happy that Romeo's story is out there for everyone to hear. However, It's tragic that his killers did what they did and got away with it. Being a lawyer (jd cadidate as of this writing) it is sad someone didn't step in as an advocate for the wolf and use back channels like Romeo's killer's lawyer did. I wish they could still do something, but at least its consolation that both of these men incurred a lot of legal fees, lost jobs and privileges, and created public scorn they had taken for granted before the killing. Thank you Nick Jans for writing this story. It was truly enjoyable.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    I feel like I should have liked this book a lot more than I did. Clearly, lots of other people loved it. But it didn't click for me, and the problem may have been with the writing and the pacing. The story--of a wolf that frequents an Alaskan community and makes friends with some of the dogs there--is amazing. But the telling of it left me wanting more. There wasn't much meat to it, and the author got in his own way a lot of the time. I wanted a lot more showing and way less telling. The story t I feel like I should have liked this book a lot more than I did. Clearly, lots of other people loved it. But it didn't click for me, and the problem may have been with the writing and the pacing. The story--of a wolf that frequents an Alaskan community and makes friends with some of the dogs there--is amazing. But the telling of it left me wanting more. There wasn't much meat to it, and the author got in his own way a lot of the time. I wanted a lot more showing and way less telling. The story that is there, I feel, would have been perfect for a longer-form magazine article; preferably with Jans' amazing photos. But for a book, there wasn't enough to support the story. The story was extraordinary, just a little bit spare for the medium chosen.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jonna Higgins-Freese

    This was one of the best books about interacting with nonhuman animals that I've read. The narrative of Juneau's relationship with Romeo was seamlessly interwoven with information about wolf biology and behavior that provided context and depth. Some of his writing is poetry reminiscent of Norman Maclean: "As a sentient, intelligent being, [Romeo] made a choice to live where he did, and to interact with us and our dogs -- not only on his own social terms, but through an adaptive understanding of This was one of the best books about interacting with nonhuman animals that I've read. The narrative of Juneau's relationship with Romeo was seamlessly interwoven with information about wolf biology and behavior that provided context and depth. Some of his writing is poetry reminiscent of Norman Maclean: "As a sentient, intelligent being, [Romeo] made a choice to live where he did, and to interact with us and our dogs -- not only on his own social terms, but through an adaptive understanding of our rules" (228). Or this: "Without knowing or caring, simply by being what he was, he brought people closer: friends and families, but also those who might have never met, if not for his presence. Across the years, I watched hundreds and finally thousands of Juneau residents -- two here, a half dozen there, one group after another, out on the broad sounding board of the lake -- lean on their ski poles and chat as they watched the wolf playing with dogs, trotting across the ice, or lying in one of his spots at the lake edge; and many times, I took part in such conversations . . . . So it was that the wolf melded into Juneau's story and became part of us" (229)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dave Allen

    A touching and very nicely written work about the precarious life of a wolf that made Juneau its home, and also a well done portrait of that Alaskan town, the balance between what is wild and what is not and how that relates to our place in the whole scheme of things. A book I would highly recommend.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Aqsa

    I want this so much! I got it! It didn't feel real lol! https://youtu.be/eie7WJF0aY0

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    In the winter of 2003 Nick Jans encountered a lone wolf near his Juneau, Alaska home. Having seen wolves in the wild before, but only rarely he is amazed at how much this wolf seems to seek out human and canine attention. Over the next few years Romeo, as the wolf becomes known locally, interacts with dozens of humans and dogs - always seeking the interaction himself. Within a few years though there are a faction of local residents who are not happy about a wolf hanging around so much. There is In the winter of 2003 Nick Jans encountered a lone wolf near his Juneau, Alaska home. Having seen wolves in the wild before, but only rarely he is amazed at how much this wolf seems to seek out human and canine attention. Over the next few years Romeo, as the wolf becomes known locally, interacts with dozens of humans and dogs - always seeking the interaction himself. Within a few years though there are a faction of local residents who are not happy about a wolf hanging around so much. There is also the increasing problem of Romeo's popularity with local residents who are thrilled to have the chance to see a wild wolf so close. Jans knows that this increased attention to Romeo could easily backfire if the wolf feels threatened and lashes out. Jans is also worried about dog owners who don't have control of their dogs or have aggressive dogs - although he never personally saw Romeo react poorly to an aggressive dog. But, unfortunately in 2009 at trophy hunter from Pennsylvania comes to Juneau with the intent of killing Romeo solely because of his local popularity. He does and when locals like Jans find out they bring it to the attention of local authorities. The trophy hunter is arrested, along with his friend who is a local resident, but their prosecution is a joke and shows that even with an animal like Romeo - in Alaska it's just another wolf that's been hunted illegally. While Romeo's story does have a sad ending, his impact is still felt on the community in Juneau. Especially with a few people like Jans who had a more long-term, intimate relationship with Romeo. Interspersed throughout Romeo's story Jans also gives a lot of information about wolves and shows just how unique the situation with Romeo was. He also gives a lot of the complicated and sad history of human interaction with wolves, both in the Continental US and specifically in Alaska. He also includes a few beautiful pictures of Romeo that he took over the years of their interactions. Overall, even though the end is sad, this is an incredible book about a very unique wolf and how much he impacted a small community over just a few years.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    I have to make this review short as I am so angry. This is a beautiful story of a most precious black beauty wolf that had a wonderful bond with humans dogs. He frolicked and played with them and went on walks with them and their humans. He was loved by many with exceptions of those few wolf hating jerks around. I would loved to have seen him. I was touched by the woman with cancer who's family would bring her out to see him. She loved her time seeing him. I have a great love for Harry and his d I have to make this review short as I am so angry. This is a beautiful story of a most precious black beauty wolf that had a wonderful bond with humans dogs. He frolicked and played with them and went on walks with them and their humans. He was loved by many with exceptions of those few wolf hating jerks around. I would loved to have seen him. I was touched by the woman with cancer who's family would bring her out to see him. She loved her time seeing him. I have a great love for Harry and his dog who were best friends with him and tried to protect him. But, as we all know would happen a damn jerk hunter killed him. Him and his friend snuck out and did it. All I have left to say is there is a special place in hell for people that desroy all beautiful things whether it be animal or human. Thank you for sharing Romeo's story. I also love he got a memorial made for him. It says ROMEO 2003-2009 THE SPIRIT OF JUNEAU'S FRIENDLY BLACK WOLF LIVES ON IN THIS WILD PLACE.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Crenshaw

    I can't say enough good about this book. I can barely write about it without blubbering. It's a magical, transformative tale based on a rare occurrence of a wild wolf living in and among the people and dogs in Juneau, AK and how he befriended and was befriended by those same people. If you enjoy wildlife this is the book to buy. LOVED IT!!!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    If this book was fiction I would not have believed it. A wild wolf being social to people and dogs for years! Nick Jans did a wonderful job of telling the story and including facts about wolves and other wildlife. Parts were tough to read but I thoroughly enjoyed this true story.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shasni Bala

    Heartwarming story, made me a little emotional. Its a good read even though memoir books are not my style, for once in a while a change of flavour is okay.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Olgalijo

    This is one of those exemplary stories where it doesn't matter how many individuals respectful of nature there are. It takes just one or, as in this case, two sick people to spoil something wonderful. This is a very sad and, at the same time, very inspiring real story.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    I enjoyed this book a lot. It is not your cutesy wolf book. A good story showing all the dangers this social animal faced in modern Alaska. The author has included some wonderful photos. Fascinating tale and moving story of a unique wolf. It was wonderful for the author to share his experiences.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Beautiful creature! Beautiful book. Sad ending. Rip sir romeo.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Noah

    This book is amazing. It should be read by anyone interested in animals and in life on earth.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Hamilton

    I want to go to Alaska now.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Shazza Maddog

    The unlikely true story of a black wolf who adopted the dogs (and in some ways, the humans) of Juneau, Alaska, making them part of his pack. Wolves create a visceral reaction in people. There are generally two reactions - awe and love and an utter loathing. When a black wolf showed up on the frozen Mendenhall Lake in December, 2003, Nick Jans was nothing short of surprised. Wolves rarely showed up that close to town - literally right outside his back door. But what happened afterward seemed like The unlikely true story of a black wolf who adopted the dogs (and in some ways, the humans) of Juneau, Alaska, making them part of his pack. Wolves create a visceral reaction in people. There are generally two reactions - awe and love and an utter loathing. When a black wolf showed up on the frozen Mendenhall Lake in December, 2003, Nick Jans was nothing short of surprised. Wolves rarely showed up that close to town - literally right outside his back door. But what happened afterward seemed like something out of a Disney movie: the wolf stayed. The wolf engaged with the domestic canines, having his favorites - Jans' female Lab, Dakotah being one. And this begins a strange journey wherein the wolf, coming to be known locally as 'Romeo', pushed boundaries far beyond what anyone expected. He recognized humans, with or without their dogs. In his six years with the Juneauites, there are only three confirmed possible issues with dogs - and none of the dogs were hurt, only shaken up. Remarkably tolerant, the wolf seemed to enjoy his life with the humans, becoming even closer to some. A bittersweet story, mostly because of how it ends, this novel stands as proof 'you can't have nice things', but, oh, while those nice things last, they seem like an incredible fairy tale where the wolf can be the hero for once.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Magda Prz

    To w ogóle nie jest historia sprzed dziesięciu lat o wilku z Alaski. To historia o Polsce 2017, o wycince puszczy, zachowaniach polityków, ochronie przyrody, reakcjach ludzi na zwierzęta w ogóle. Bardzo gorzka. - Co jest z nami nie tak? [...] Co, do cholery, jest nie tak z nami wszystkimi, że tylko tam siedzieliśmy i nic nie mówiliśmy? Mogliśmy się wszyscy zerwać i zacząć krzyczeć: "Ty draniu! Ty parszywy morderco". Wszyscy razem. Mieliśmy szansę. Miałam jedyną szansę, żeby powiedzieć albo zrobić To w ogóle nie jest historia sprzed dziesięciu lat o wilku z Alaski. To historia o Polsce 2017, o wycince puszczy, zachowaniach polityków, ochronie przyrody, reakcjach ludzi na zwierzęta w ogóle. Bardzo gorzka. - Co jest z nami nie tak? [...] Co, do cholery, jest nie tak z nami wszystkimi, że tylko tam siedzieliśmy i nic nie mówiliśmy? Mogliśmy się wszyscy zerwać i zacząć krzyczeć: "Ty draniu! Ty parszywy morderco". Wszyscy razem. Mieliśmy szansę. Miałam jedyną szansę, żeby powiedzieć albo zrobić coś, co by się liczyło, a ja po prostu siedziałam. Wszyscy po prostu siedzieliśmy. Co by zrobił sąd z takim wybuchem? Aresztowałby nas wszystkich, oskarżył wszystkich o obrazę sądu, ukarał grzywną, wsadził do więzienia? Byłoby to warte każdej kary. Ta chwila towarzyszyłaby nam na zawsze. Dzięki niej moglibyśmy sobie przypomnieć, kim naprawdę jesteśmy. Tymczasem zostaliśmy skazani na echo własnej ciszy.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Liisa

    Probably the best wild animal memoir I’ve ever read. Jans brought Romeos personality to life throughout the entire, poetically written book. It made me feel like I was watching Romeo play with my dogs. I started reading this book right before our trip to Alaska because I knew it was about Alaska. What I didn’t know was that it was based in Juneau, where we camped for the week. We hiked to the glacier where most of the story took place and found the memorial plaque for Romeo. I highly recommend t Probably the best wild animal memoir I’ve ever read. Jans brought Romeos personality to life throughout the entire, poetically written book. It made me feel like I was watching Romeo play with my dogs. I started reading this book right before our trip to Alaska because I knew it was about Alaska. What I didn’t know was that it was based in Juneau, where we camped for the week. We hiked to the glacier where most of the story took place and found the memorial plaque for Romeo. I highly recommend this book to anyone who loves wolves. Even to people who don’t. Open your eyes and your hearts to see that they aren’t the big bad wolf of faerie tales that we were all taught. Run Fast Romeo. I feel like I have met you 🐾🖤🐾

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    Nick Jans does a great job of presenting facts about wolves and how misguided it is to have an anti-wolf mentality, and he does it in such a way that is rational and well thought out rather than in your face and sensationalized. His more philosophical thoughts on wildlife and wolves are well presented and thought provoking. The final fate of Romeo is an upsetting read, but the last few pages where Jans talks of all the positive ways that Romeo affected his life, and the lives of many Juneauites, Nick Jans does a great job of presenting facts about wolves and how misguided it is to have an anti-wolf mentality, and he does it in such a way that is rational and well thought out rather than in your face and sensationalized. His more philosophical thoughts on wildlife and wolves are well presented and thought provoking. The final fate of Romeo is an upsetting read, but the last few pages where Jans talks of all the positive ways that Romeo affected his life, and the lives of many Juneauites, left a really great impression on me. I'm glad that people like Nick Jans and Harry Robinson exist and are willing to tell their tales and stand up for creatures like Romeo.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Olita Rodriguez-Dominguez

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The story of the wolf and the community is magical and touching yet i could not shake off the feeling, throughout the whole book,of humans feeling superior to other species (nothing new here)..wilderness,Alaska,magic happened and then..well..human happened and that's all i got to say..disappointed with people who feel like they can decide about the fate of any animal,disappointed with those sadistic killers and disappointed with the justice system (again..welcome to real world)..but the author a The story of the wolf and the community is magical and touching yet i could not shake off the feeling, throughout the whole book,of humans feeling superior to other species (nothing new here)..wilderness,Alaska,magic happened and then..well..human happened and that's all i got to say..disappointed with people who feel like they can decide about the fate of any animal,disappointed with those sadistic killers and disappointed with the justice system (again..welcome to real world)..but the author as well as the community of that small alaskan town give a bit of hope in humanity...rip Romeo and all other animals killed with no reason by the people

  27. 5 out of 5

    Moaning

    An intriguing tale of a wolf that befriended a community. I enjoyed learning about this strange interaction between wild and civilized - unfortunately sometimes the wild and the civilized was turned upside down. There was in some places too much detail about wolf behavior and habitat but overall it was an enjoyable if not also disturbing read as it demonstrated how uncivilized we as humans can be at times.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michele Amedee

    This is a DNF for me. I feel really bad about it because it’s the only time my husband has surprised me with a book as a gift. He had heard great reviews about it on NPR. I think there’s probably a really interesting story in it somewhere, but this author doesn’t know how to tell it. It’s tirelessly wordy with way more details than necessary. I think maybe someday I will try it again just to see if my initial perception still stands. I couldn’t get past page 77.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Okay, so when are we moving to Juneau?

  30. 4 out of 5

    Anjj

    loved this book and so did not want it to end. Great read but so sad. Can not articulate how angry I feel at ppl who commit crimes and walk free.

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