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The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable
Author: Patrick Lencioni
Publisher: Published April 11th 2002 by Jossey-Bass (first published September 28th 1998)
ISBN: 9780787960759
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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In The Five Dysfunctions of a Team Patrick Lencioni once again offers a leadership fable that is as enthralling and instructive as his first two best-selling books, The Five Temptations of a CEO and The Four Obsessions of an Extraordinary Executive. This time, he turns his keen intellect and storytelling power to the fascinating, complex world of teams. Kathryn Petersen, D In The Five Dysfunctions of a Team Patrick Lencioni once again offers a leadership fable that is as enthralling and instructive as his first two best-selling books, The Five Temptations of a CEO and The Four Obsessions of an Extraordinary Executive. This time, he turns his keen intellect and storytelling power to the fascinating, complex world of teams. Kathryn Petersen, Decision Tech's CEO, faces the ultimate leadership crisis: Uniting a team in such disarray that it threatens to bring down the entire company. Will she succeed? Will she be fired? Will the company fail? Lencioni's utterly gripping tale serves as a timeless reminder that leadership requires as much courage as it does insight. Throughout the story, Lencioni reveals the five dysfunctions which go to the very heart of why teams even the best ones-often struggle. He outlines a powerful model and actionable steps that can be used to overcome these common hurdles and build a cohesive, effective team. Just as with his other books, Lencioni has written a compelling fable with a powerful yet deceptively simple message for all those who strive to be exceptional team leaders.

30 review for The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable

  1. 4 out of 5

    Neil

    I've been in corporate America for just under 4 years now. In my time, I've never really bought into the majority of management strategies I've seen because well, they blatantly do not work; and if they do, its at an absurd cost of employee retention, dissatisfaction and needless overwork. Passive aggressiveness, no accountability, scared of conflict... I see it too often, and I'm constantly frustrated by it. And just when I thought I was alone, I read this book and was completely blown away. Eve I've been in corporate America for just under 4 years now. In my time, I've never really bought into the majority of management strategies I've seen because well, they blatantly do not work; and if they do, its at an absurd cost of employee retention, dissatisfaction and needless overwork. Passive aggressiveness, no accountability, scared of conflict... I see it too often, and I'm constantly frustrated by it. And just when I thought I was alone, I read this book and was completely blown away. Everything I've felt, is here, written down in this book. Its quite extraordinary. I feel a bit like Jerry Mcguire did after writing his 'Mission Statement.' I want to buy copies of this book and put it in the mailboxes of management across corporate America. Unfortunately, one thing I've learned in life is you can't force people to change, they have to be willing and accepting to move forward on there own... or be forced by a higher hand. I can't force others who don't see it themselves, and as the low man on the totem pole, its a hard to play the upper hand. But dammit, at least I'll go down swinging, knowing I'm not alone.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

    Bear with me. I am highly skeptical of models as methods versus tools (I will explain later) and of corporate literature. With that bias, this book would have been lucky to get three stars from me. Please keep that in mind. What I mean by a model as a method versus a tool, is that when a model is presented to help people try and understand how something functions I have no problem with it. Meyers-Briggs personality test is a great example. Fun to take and compare with people and get an idea of wh Bear with me. I am highly skeptical of models as methods versus tools (I will explain later) and of corporate literature. With that bias, this book would have been lucky to get three stars from me. Please keep that in mind. What I mean by a model as a method versus a tool, is that when a model is presented to help people try and understand how something functions I have no problem with it. Meyers-Briggs personality test is a great example. Fun to take and compare with people and get an idea of where they come from. But if you are a borderline on any of the 4 pairs then depending on your mood you can easily have 2 even 4 different likely personality types. And there are 7 billion people in the world and only 16 types--they don't all fit in those 16 categories. When someone takes a model and tries to impose it on the world and say this is the way things are, then I balk. Regarding corporate literature in general, I won't say that it is useless, because it certainly isn't, but it has only a fractional effect as compared to actually experiencing working in a good team or for a good leader. It can be helpful but pales beside a good leader pulling you aside to help you. The "fable" itself? Actually not that bad for a teamwork book. The whole thing is stilted because it is wrapped around an agenda but on the good side it is short, easy to read, and decently written. And I honestly can't say the five points are wrong--I think they are all valid. There are much worse teamwork or leadership books out there. If you have to read one, or are genuinely interested in this genre then pick it up. Otherwise I wouldn't use your valuable time. Two stars.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Silvert

    Five Dysfunctions of a Team As a consultant who has worked with hundreds of teams in organizations large and small, I can attest that model outlined in “The Five Dysfunctions of a Team” is both accurate in it’s root diagnosis of team dysfunctionalism, and is as pervasive as human nature itself. As with all of Lencioni’s books, he opens with a fable and concludes with the model that is the basis for the story’s solution. In the fable, a new CEO is confronted with a dysfunctional executive team and Five Dysfunctions of a Team As a consultant who has worked with hundreds of teams in organizations large and small, I can attest that model outlined in “The Five Dysfunctions of a Team” is both accurate in it’s root diagnosis of team dysfunctionalism, and is as pervasive as human nature itself. As with all of Lencioni’s books, he opens with a fable and concludes with the model that is the basis for the story’s solution. In the fable, a new CEO is confronted with a dysfunctional executive team and pressure from the board to execute a quick turn around. As she feels out how the current culture impacts collaboration, idea generation, and execution, the CEO gradually works through each stage of the Five Dysfunctions model to re-position the company for success. The model in pyramid form: Lack of trust: In this bottom stage, team members are hesitant to open up about their fears or insecurities about a project. Fear of Conflict: Fearing retribution or political consequences, team members avoid rigorous debate over the issues and decisions that matter most. This can be reinforced by local legends: “The last time somebody challenged the boss’s idea, he wasn’t around for long afterwards.” Healthy, constructive conflict – or candor – is key to surfacing the best ideas. Fear of conflict snuffs out the creative process. Lack of Commitment: Lack of vigorous debate does not prevent decisions from being made. Low team involvement in how decisions are shaped and carried out leads to weak buy- in. Avoidance of Accountability: When commitment is low, excuses are readily available when results are not achieved. “We all knew this was un-realistic to begin with, now you’re going to hold us accountable?” Inattention to Results: At this pinnacle stage, team members are investing valuable time and energy in the politics of self-protection. Obsessive email trails are stored for easy retrieval, stories are honed that explain where the break down occurred and by whom. It’s every ‘team’ member for him or herself. The collective concept is crushed. In highly functional teams the pyramid, inverted, is just as relevant: High levels of trust leads to healthy, constructive candor in the service of unearthing the best ideas. Fully engaged team members feel high levels of commitment, because while their particular idea may not have won, they’re perspective was heard and respected. This feeds a focus on individual and collective accountability to achieve the goals agreed upon, which requires near total focus upon delivering results. Lencioni captures the human essence of teamwork and connects the dots from trust to profit. Highly recommended.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Amanda NEVER MANDY

    This is another one of my “have to” and not “want to” reads. I would never even consider reading one of these types of books for fun, they are not my style at all. The information they contain is usually common sense stuff that people are aware of but unwilling or unable to incorporate into their day-to-day work lives. Most jobs are group based versus individual and even if you are in the mindset to make whatever changes that books like this deem necessary, it doesn’t mean everyone else you work This is another one of my “have to” and not “want to” reads. I would never even consider reading one of these types of books for fun, they are not my style at all. The information they contain is usually common sense stuff that people are aware of but unwilling or unable to incorporate into their day-to-day work lives. Most jobs are group based versus individual and even if you are in the mindset to make whatever changes that books like this deem necessary, it doesn’t mean everyone else you work with is. Thankfully the author makes dry material into something tolerable by sharing his message in a story format and doesn’t bog the book down with graphs, sample work sheets and quizzes. It’s pretty basic and to the point with identifying problems and offering solutions. The length was acceptable as well as the writing style so I would place it a little higher on my Dull Jane shelf. I suppose if I had to recommend one of these things I would this one over quite a few others, especially if you wanted to know why your team sucked and how you could improve it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    المدرب محمد الملا

    Simply, this book is "Must read books" list, I liked the story way to write the book, and the simple make Sense model of the five dysfunctions of teams I already recommended this books to my friends, it's must read for every one I will recommend that the reader should be ware of "Tuckman's stages of group development" which will put this book in the right context

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    This is a one of the best business novels out there. I love the idea of introducing concepts through a storyline of a fictional organization. The only thing better would be if it were based on actual events that was told in story form. Kathryn is a CEO who takes over a company struggling with its market share and profit. She has the courage to attack the difficult issues rarely losing her composure and delivers criticism in a way that it mostly encourages discussion and positive conflict. I canno This is a one of the best business novels out there. I love the idea of introducing concepts through a storyline of a fictional organization. The only thing better would be if it were based on actual events that was told in story form. Kathryn is a CEO who takes over a company struggling with its market share and profit. She has the courage to attack the difficult issues rarely losing her composure and delivers criticism in a way that it mostly encourages discussion and positive conflict. I cannot say I have come across any managers in corporate America who are effective as Kathryn. However, I am convinced she must exist amongst us in the real world. On the other hand I find the dysfunctions described in this short novel to be on point and rampant it manufacturing facilities and offices across the country. As difficult as it is to admit, I saw myself a couple of times in some of the characters. I still think it would be a tall order to effectively change the dynamics of work teams across this great country. We are a culture based on competition and individual success and it will be quite challenging to change that direction. Challenging but not impossible. I

  7. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    How lovely if things were actually this simple.

  8. 5 out of 5

    jack

    forced to read this one for work. did some awful group work with it also. really not that helpful in a bullshit retail situation.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Marleigh

    First line: "Only one person thought Kathryn was the right choice to become CEO of DecisionTech, Inc. Summary: Lencioni identifies five problems with executive teams, which he presents through a story (fable) and then analyzes. Spoilers! In as much as reference books can have spoilers. The 5 dysfunctions are: 1. Absence of trust. Where trust is comfort with showing vulnerability and admitting mistakes to teammates. 2. Fear of conflict. Teams need to be able to have passionate debate and walk away First line: "Only one person thought Kathryn was the right choice to become CEO of DecisionTech, Inc. Summary: Lencioni identifies five problems with executive teams, which he presents through a story (fable) and then analyzes. Spoilers! In as much as reference books can have spoilers. The 5 dysfunctions are: 1. Absence of trust. Where trust is comfort with showing vulnerability and admitting mistakes to teammates. 2. Fear of conflict. Teams need to be able to have passionate debate and walk away with no collateral damage. Lencioni describes a “false harmony” that is a sign of this. 3. Lack of commitment. Phoning it in rather than buying into the project. The key here is while not everyone gets their way, they should all be heard and their opinions considered and valued. 4. Avoidance of accountability. Here, they’re talking about teammates being able to call each other on poor performance, rather than having all accountability done by the team leader. 5. Inattention to results. In particular, putting personal goals above team goals. They seems like fine goals. I'm a little unclear how to achieve them, despite the suggestions in the back. I also feel like point 2 could easily be misconstrued. Permission to have passionate debate does not mean permission to be an asshole. Actually, I think Lencioni usually uses the term "argument," while I prefer "debate" because I think it frames the issue in a more civil way. Anyway, it had some interesting thoughts, and it certainly was a quick read. The story was lousy for fiction, though great for a reference book, and it did illustrate the problems.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Vam Norrison

    I'm relatively new to the corporate world and observe heavy reliance on inane hierarchical-pyramid models and very linear "cycles" designed to describe organizations, relationships, goals, processes, progress and, ultimately, success. 'Five Dysfunctions' is a great example. While I'd love to rip into this book's awkward narrative structure, cartoonish characters, and childish melodrama, I'm certain many already have. If this book is to be considered a fable, it is only for its oversimplification I'm relatively new to the corporate world and observe heavy reliance on inane hierarchical-pyramid models and very linear "cycles" designed to describe organizations, relationships, goals, processes, progress and, ultimately, success. 'Five Dysfunctions' is a great example. While I'd love to rip into this book's awkward narrative structure, cartoonish characters, and childish melodrama, I'm certain many already have. If this book is to be considered a fable, it is only for its oversimplification and pretensions to wisdom. Life is a messy, confusing thing. 'Five Dysfunctions' is no better than a toy compass on your journey through it. One redemptive, practical use for this book might be reading it with everyone in your dysfunctional group to provide a framework vocabulary to discuss real issues. (Also, if anyone has a passionate hatred for its structure and content, promote them.)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Morrison

    Was chosen for a work thing, then we all realized that it didn't apply to our group, because we actually aren't dysfunctional at all, so we scrapped our plan to discuss it and went skiing instead! That being said, I did learn some very valuable lessons...ok, I didn't...but I did read it, at least. For the good of the team.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Robert Chapman

    I read this book 10 years ago when it was first released. Back then I was at a point in my career where the lessons of this book were not really applicable to my circumstances. I decided to give it another read as I remembered it to be a good book and since its release it has also gained a reputation as one of the better books on the topics of Leadership and Organizational Development. The book tells a story to illustrate the dysfunctions using the setting of an executive team in a fictitious com I read this book 10 years ago when it was first released. Back then I was at a point in my career where the lessons of this book were not really applicable to my circumstances. I decided to give it another read as I remembered it to be a good book and since its release it has also gained a reputation as one of the better books on the topics of Leadership and Organizational Development. The book tells a story to illustrate the dysfunctions using the setting of an executive team in a fictitious company. This resonated with me as I am now part of an executive team of similar makeup. The five dysfunctions are not rocket science and the book does not propose them to be such. The real value of the book comes in walking through each dysfunction and understanding what the negative impacts of each are and on the flipside the benefits which curing each can bring. No company or team is perfect; there will always be dysfunction to some level. This book offers a good yardstick against which a team can measure itself and set goals for improvement.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tania Lukinyuk

    Skeptical business book reader, I had zero expectations from this book. I only took it because it was less than 150 pages and was recommended by two people whose opinion I respected. I am happy to admit that I was wrong. The book is written as a story of new leader coming to an IT company with poorly acting management team. The way she managed her new team members - very different, often contradicting and conflicting with each other or working in their silos - is great learning process on effect Skeptical business book reader, I had zero expectations from this book. I only took it because it was less than 150 pages and was recommended by two people whose opinion I respected. I am happy to admit that I was wrong. The book is written as a story of new leader coming to an IT company with poorly acting management team. The way she managed her new team members - very different, often contradicting and conflicting with each other or working in their silos - is great learning process on effective team building. Grandly recommended.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sergey Morovshik

    Отличная книга, просто и понятно описан ситуация, инструменты, методы простейшей диагностики команды. Все описанное в книге отзывается мне на 100% и может я бы добавил бы ещё кое-что... В общем, я прочитав понял почему многие предприниматели и лидеры ставят эту книгу в топ-10 к обязательному прочтению менеджерами. Я тоже беру книгу в топ-10.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sarina

    Certainly a guide most of us are in dire need of or everyone should at least read once. It's necessary for teams or groups not just in the corporate world, but I think in all areas, even in university or school level. The translation by Farjana Mobin, and Onnorokom Prokashoni was just amazing. It's like I have become a part of Katheryn's team myself. Hats off to the translating team for bringing such an important book to the attention of the people of this country and hats off to the author for w Certainly a guide most of us are in dire need of or everyone should at least read once. It's necessary for teams or groups not just in the corporate world, but I think in all areas, even in university or school level. The translation by Farjana Mobin, and Onnorokom Prokashoni was just amazing. It's like I have become a part of Katheryn's team myself. Hats off to the translating team for bringing such an important book to the attention of the people of this country and hats off to the author for writing so clearly.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Chad Warner

    This identifies the causes of dysfunction in a team, and tells how to avoid them. It's astute, applicable guidance on improving a team's performance by improving behavior. The first part is a fable, and the second part is an explanation of the concepts. It starts by saying that teamwork, more than products, tech, etc., make a company successful. Teamwork disintegrates if even one of the 5 dysfunctions is present. Teams succeed because they're exceedingly human. By acknowledging imperfections, the This identifies the causes of dysfunction in a team, and tells how to avoid them. It's astute, applicable guidance on improving a team's performance by improving behavior. The first part is a fable, and the second part is an explanation of the concepts. It starts by saying that teamwork, more than products, tech, etc., make a company successful. Teamwork disintegrates if even one of the 5 dysfunctions is present. Teams succeed because they're exceedingly human. By acknowledging imperfections, they overcome natural tendencies toward dysfunctions. I've heard this book mentioned several times over the years. I decided to finally read it after it was referenced in Traction. I read this because I've been growing the team at my web agency, OptimWise, and I want it to be a high-performing team. Notes 5 Dysfunctions Dysfunction 1: Absence of Trust A team can't achieve results unless the members trust each other. Trust requires being vulnerable with each other (here, trust doesn't refer to being able to predict what a teammate will do, as in, "I trust Tom will do this."). Team members who aren't genuinely open about mistakes and weaknesses makes it impossible to build a foundation for trust. Healthy debate is a sign of trust. Dysfunction 2: Fear of Conflict Teams that lack trust are incapable of engaging in unfiltered and passionate debate of ideas. Instead, they resort to veiled discussions and guarded comments. Open, constructive, ideological conflict is critical. What makes meetings boring is that they don't have conflict (movies are interesting because they have conflict, and so are meetings). Dysfunction 3: Lack of Commitment Without having aired opinions in debate, team members rarely buy in and commit to decisions, though they may feign agreement in meetings. People must weigh in before they can buy in, but it's OK to disagree and still commit. Dysfunction 4: Avoidance of Accountability Without committing to clear plan of action, even most focused and driven people often hesitate to call their peers on behaviors and actions that are counterproductive to good of team. People need to have bought into collective goals to hold each other accountable. When holding people accountable, assume they have the team's best interests in mind and are trying to be helpful, but still push them. Dysfunction 5: Inattention to Results Occurs when team members put individual needs (ego, career development, recognition) or divisions above collective goals of team. Must have clear, specific, actionable goals, and track fairly frequently (e.g., monthly). Everyone is responsible for meeting collective goals. Viewed positively (opposites of dysfunctions) 1. Trust. 2. Engage in unfiltered conflict around ideas. 3. Commit to decisions and plans of actions. 4. Hold one another accountable for delivering against plans. 5. Focus on achievement of collective results. How to avoid dysfunctions Dysfunction 1: Build trust by sharing personality profiles (Myers Briggs), 360 degree feedback. Dysfunction 2: Acknowledge conflict can be productive. Remind each other when conflict arises. Personality profiles tell how people handle conflict. Dysfunction 3: Set deadlines for decisions. Use contingency and worst case analysis to overcome fear of wrong decision. Dysfunction 4: Publish goals and standards. Have regular progress reviews and feedback. Have rewards at team level, not individual. Dysfunction 5: Make results clear and public, and reward only those behaviors and actions that contribute to those results. Tie rewards, especially compensation, to team results.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Isaac Yuen

    Usually books about leadership, teamwork, and organizational culture bore me to death, but this one is different; I finished it in around two hours, and it was an interesting read all the way through. As the description notes, Lencioni crafts a fictional but realistic story around a high-tech Silicon Valley startup in crisis: although they have better technology, expertise, and initial investments, in recent months they have been rapidly ceding their advantage to competitors. A new CEO renowned Usually books about leadership, teamwork, and organizational culture bore me to death, but this one is different; I finished it in around two hours, and it was an interesting read all the way through. As the description notes, Lencioni crafts a fictional but realistic story around a high-tech Silicon Valley startup in crisis: although they have better technology, expertise, and initial investments, in recent months they have been rapidly ceding their advantage to competitors. A new CEO renowned for her experience in building teams is brought in to shake things up; the story revolves around her dealings with the various personalities within the company and her attempts to steer the company around. The five dysfunctions of a team outlined in this book are quite simple, and their results are also outlined: 1.) Absence of trust LEADS TO need for invulnerability 2.) Fear of conflict LEADS TO fear of conflict 3.) Lack of commitment LEADS TO ambiguity 4.) Avoidance of accountability LEADS TO low standards 5.) Inattention to results LEADS TO individual status and ego over the team I’m not going to go into too much detail here; read the book. Many of us have seen and been part of touchy feely team-building exercises. Chances are they work for a little while, and then we settle back into our old habits. Lencioni even admits that "while there are certainly some benefits derived from rigorous and creative outdoor activities involving collective support and cooperation, those benefits do not always translate directly to the working world.” But he contends that it is teamwork - not finance, not strategy, not technology - that is the ultimate competitive advantage, because it is at once so powerful and so rare. So it’s worthwhile to focus on building one properly if you have a group of highly skilled people who have to constantly work together. (This emphasis on teambuilding might not be relevant for short term “hot groups” that are just put together for short durations to get a task done and then disbanded afterwards). This storytelling approach works wonders for material that might otherwise be too fluffy or abstract; I was under the impression that it was a bunch of short fictional examples to depict specific concepts, but I was pleasantly surprised at the long continuous tale. Its uninterrupted length gives the reader an opportunity to relate to the various characters within the story, and keeps him/her engaged throughout. Indeed, I immediately began to associate those fictional characters to past team members in the real world: the insufferable know-it-all, the socially inept and tactless, the genius introverts, the awesome dude that fills whatever role that needs doing to get the job done. They’re all here. On a personal level, I also recognized my own personal dysfunctions in team situations, and will seek to work on them in the future. Two examples: 1.) On many teams, I just want to get my stuff done, without regard for the performance of the overall team. Putting the individual ego aside is tough to do without someone holding you accountable. 2.) I actively avoid interpersonal conflict, even when it would be prudent and constructive to engage in it. It’s a character flaw. In summary, I highly recommend the book. It’s a super easy read, simple but engaging (a difficult thing to pull off), and very relevant if you spend any time slogging it out with a group of individuals instead of working as a team. I’m sure we’ve all been there.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jim B

    3 stars means "liked it." This book contains a lot of wisdom, some of which is counter-intuitive for some people who've never worked on a positive team. For example, the first dysfunction -- lack of trust -- is hindered by the need to be invincible and helped when people learn to be vulnerable, to "trust that their peers' intentions are good and there is no reason to be protective or careful around the group." Some people will read those words and think that there is no group of people where the 3 stars means "liked it." This book contains a lot of wisdom, some of which is counter-intuitive for some people who've never worked on a positive team. For example, the first dysfunction -- lack of trust -- is hindered by the need to be invincible and helped when people learn to be vulnerable, to "trust that their peers' intentions are good and there is no reason to be protective or careful around the group." Some people will read those words and think that there is no group of people where they do not have to be protective or careful, and that will keep them from building the necessary trust for a good team. I don't believe that revealing the 5 dysfunctions is a spoiler -- you have to read the book to get the full logic and impact, and to discover their roots and their treatment. So here are Lencioni's Five Dysfunctions: 1. Absence of trust 2. Fear of conflict 3. Lack of commitment 4. Avoidance of accountability 5. Inattention to results Reading other reviews, I know that the story format is a popular feature of this book. I realized, however, that I've read this book before (about 6 - 8 years ago) and the story hasn't stayed with me. The most useful information came from the pyramid diagram in the story, and the points made in the end section of the book. Having served on several teams, but especially parish teams, I think that there are a few parts of the book that aren't emphasized enough for a church that reads the book. Unlike a business team, the church team in my religion is not a top down hierarchy. Human nature would like to have its way, of course, and most business books like this one emphasize a form of leadership that can easily slip into the "lording it over" the members of the congregation. In the same section where he condemns consensus building, Lencioni does emphasize the need for "buy in" among team members. What a business book fails to tell parish leaders is that the congregation needs some of that "buy in." Although the dysfunctions described in this book harm churches far more than pushy leaders, a church functions in a spiritual realm and our message is discredited when a few people who believe they know best (and don't care about their fellow congregation members to share their vision of what that "best" is) start making unilateral decisions. Just as Lencioni points out that a strong leader can create an accountability vacuum in a team by becoming "the only source of discipline" (page 215) so a strong leadership team that doesn't see their connection to the congregation can create situations where debate within the congregation is suppressed (despite Lencioni's admonition that debate is healthy) and the "collective wisdom" concept is limited to the leaders and never sought from the "rank and file" members who have a stake in church matters and much wisdom as well. Although I agree that the principles in this book need to be understood by every leader, I wish that a similar book existed that addresses the tensions of leadership in a spiritual setting. In a congregation members are not customers nor the leadership team, and yet they are stakeholders and the Christ's people. I agree with the principles, but when I line them up with what Jesus wants of leaders, I feel like something is missing, including warnings about how business leadership is different spiritual leadership and advice that builds the whole body of Christ, not only a leadership team that is united in its decisions.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Laura Frey (Reading in Bed)

    This is the best business book I've read, which is to say, it wasn't complete garbage.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    This was helpful, I think. I liked the suggestions for nonintrusive team-building exercises re personal histories and work contributions (below). If you don't have time to read this, the 5 dysfunctions are: (1) absence of trust (manifests as invulnerability), (2) fear of conflict (manifests as artificial harmony), (3) lack of commitment (manifests as ambiguity), (4) avoidance of accountability (manifests as low standards), (5) inattention to results (manifests as status and ego). Personal history This was helpful, I think. I liked the suggestions for nonintrusive team-building exercises re personal histories and work contributions (below). If you don't have time to read this, the 5 dysfunctions are: (1) absence of trust (manifests as invulnerability), (2) fear of conflict (manifests as artificial harmony), (3) lack of commitment (manifests as ambiguity), (4) avoidance of accountability (manifests as low standards), (5) inattention to results (manifests as status and ego). Personal history exercise: "I want to hear about your life as a child, but I am not interested in your inner child." (1) Hometown? (2) # kids in the family? (3) Interesting childhood hobbies? (4) Biggest challenge growing up? (5) First job? Work contributions exercise: each person answers these 2 questions about everyone on the team, then share. (1) Identify the single most important contribution each peer makes to the team. (2) Identify one area to improve upon or eliminate for the good of the team.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    I'm so sad that this is the first book I've finished in 2012. It was chosen for a book study at school. It's an easy read, and has some very good points and good information for team building. But, books like this are just annoying to me. I'm not a fan of fables. It feels condescending. They just aren't my thing. Kathryn takes over as CEO of a software company and works to rebuild the leadership team of vice-presidents. She ruffles feathers, but ultimately prevails in building a cohesive, goal-or I'm so sad that this is the first book I've finished in 2012. It was chosen for a book study at school. It's an easy read, and has some very good points and good information for team building. But, books like this are just annoying to me. I'm not a fan of fables. It feels condescending. They just aren't my thing. Kathryn takes over as CEO of a software company and works to rebuild the leadership team of vice-presidents. She ruffles feathers, but ultimately prevails in building a cohesive, goal-oriented team by focusing the team on the five main dysfunctions that are keeping the company from realizing its potential. But I think the most annoying detail is that the company is located in the Silicon Valley, specifically Half Moon Bay. Ummm...Half Moon Bay is a tiny coastal farming community and is south of the Bay area, closer to Santa Cruz. Bad author! LOL

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Yoak

    I really enjoyed this little book. It's been on my list for a while, and got moved to the front of the list as we're going to discuss it at a management retreat next month. I can see why it is a classic. It covers several problems in team dynamic that resonate with things we're already discussing. It is immediately on-topic and actionable.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rita

    "In the context of building a team, trust is the confidence among team members that their peers' intentions are good, and that there is no reason to be protective or careful around the group. In essence, teammates must get comfortable being vulnerable with one another." This.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Linda Vituma

    Grāmata darbam - izlasi; izdari; paskaties, kas izdevās. Lasi atkal, dari atkal un tā līdz vēlamajam rezultātam.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mona_97_

    من الجدير ان يتسأل المرء الذي يعيش في مجتمع يعتمد بدرجة اولى على العمل الجماعي ماسبب فشلنا على رغم المهارات و الطاقة الهائلة التي يحظى بها الفريق! يسعى الكاتب لتوضيح خمس عوامل تؤدي لخلل العمل الجماعي من ثم يطرح بعض الحلول الفعالة.. كتاب مفيد جدًا لمن يعمل في فرق سواء علميًّا او عمليًا او حياتيًا.

  26. 5 out of 5

    thethousanderclub

    I've been hesitant to read business-oriented books in the past. I've laid out my reasons why in a separate blog post. When I was invited to participate in a book club at work and read and discuss the business book The Five Dysfunctions of a Team I was thrilled to participate, but my excitement was more in being able to interact with other leaders and not as much regarding the book itself. Happily, I found some value in the book and would be willing to recommend it to the others. The first red fla I've been hesitant to read business-oriented books in the past. I've laid out my reasons why in a separate blog post. When I was invited to participate in a book club at work and read and discuss the business book The Five Dysfunctions of a Team I was thrilled to participate, but my excitement was more in being able to interact with other leaders and not as much regarding the book itself. Happily, I found some value in the book and would be willing to recommend it to the others. The first red flag that went up when I was introduced to the book was the subtitle: "A Leadership Fable." I immediately thought of Who Moved My Cheese? and the fable it is intended to be. That book, in my opinion, is so juvenile it's barely worth reading. (In fact, I don't really think it is worth reading). I was worried The Five Dysfunctions would also take the simplistic to the point of offense route. Although The Five Dysfunctions is simply written (don't expect Dickens here), I would not consider it a simple book. I fully admit that the book club interaction I had at work helped tremendously in assisting me to glean meaning and lessons from the book. Yet, I do believe there are lessons to be learned here even in the absence of having a team or club to interact with while reading the book. The fiction in this case, as opposed to something like Who Moved My Cheese?, was surprisingly effective. It was applicable without being infantile. Inevitably, The Five Dysfunctions posits its own "secret sauce" of teamwork along with the supreme obstacles to achieving it (hence the five dysfunctions). Reading this book wasn't exactly a revelatory experience, but it does provide some additional insights I had not considered to the fullest extent. If any one author truly has found the "secret sauce" of business, teamwork, or whatever else, there would probably be far less business books to peruse and digest. I believe in the power of ideas, however, and The Five Dysfunctions give some tasty food for thought. In the end, I was pleasantly (albeit mildly) surprised by The Five Dysfunctions. I didn't find it pretentious, as I do many business books. (Thankfully the author didn't recommend I had to read his book multiple times in a year in order to truly appreciate it!). Teamwork, effective and efficient teamwork, is desperately sought after in almost all businesses, whether its a call center or an emergency room staff. There is some good information to be found here, and it's worth a read. http://thethousanderclub.blogspot.com/

  27. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Hamill

    This is a story about a team of executives who are suffering from five dysfunctions that have pretty much crippled them. As repeated a few times in the book, they should be doing great. They have more money, a better product and more promise than their competitors, but they are failing. The heroine is Kathryn, the new CEO brought in to turn them and the company around. Told as a story, this is a pretty good method of teaching what the dysfunctions are while giving examples of what they look like This is a story about a team of executives who are suffering from five dysfunctions that have pretty much crippled them. As repeated a few times in the book, they should be doing great. They have more money, a better product and more promise than their competitors, but they are failing. The heroine is Kathryn, the new CEO brought in to turn them and the company around. Told as a story, this is a pretty good method of teaching what the dysfunctions are while giving examples of what they look like in team dynamics. I enjoyed it for the most part, but it slowed down about halfway through. Some of the interactions of the team were a little predictable. I didn't much care for the questionnaire. What good is it if you can't make copies to actually take the questionnaire? They can't expect folks to mark up their copy of the book, can they? The end part that talks about how to put the dysfunctions into use is also a bit unhelpful, because it changes from advice to examples of how the dysfunctions might manifest to reasons why putting the changes in place would be difficult (without any tips on how to make it less so). Basically, the end matter isn't all that consistent. While all of this is good stuff, the thing I get out of this is that for a team to make these changes, they're going to have to be taught the dysfunctions and monitored/mentored by someone who knows the dysfunctions inside and out. It's not one of those books that one person alone can read and then transform into lasting change. Then again, someone could read this and look for things they do when interacting with their teams. It might help one recognize if they were contributing to one or more of the dysfunctions, perhaps even help them understand why they might have trouble working with others or why certain people on their teams are unliked, despite putting out quality work. So, I liked this. It isn't earthshattering, but it has a solid story, a good example of a team turning around, and a short list of actions that can make or break a team's success. I'd recommend it to folks who enjoy reading books about teamwork, and those who'd rather get their team advice via a story rather than a manual. I borrowed the review copy of this book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Loy Machedo

    What the book is about? 1. A fictional tale of the corporate personality & process challenges people face on a day-to-day basis. 2. Written in a clear, easy-to-understand manner with each character being portrayed in a manner that anyone can relate to. 3. Divided into two parts - the first part being attributed to the fictional story and the second part being dedicated to the non-fictional and at times academic style of teaching and preaching. 4. A call-to-action on the 5 dysfunctions of a team What the book is about? 1. A fictional tale of the corporate personality & process challenges people face on a day-to-day basis. 2. Written in a clear, easy-to-understand manner with each character being portrayed in a manner that anyone can relate to. 3. Divided into two parts - the first part being attributed to the fictional story and the second part being dedicated to the non-fictional and at times academic style of teaching and preaching. 4. A call-to-action on the 5 dysfunctions of a team namely: • Absence of trust—unwilling to be vulnerable within the group • Fear of conflict—seeking artificial harmony over constructive passionate debate • Lack of commitment—feigning buy-in for group decisions creates ambiguity throughout the organization • Avoidance of accountability—ducking the responsibility to call peers on counterproductive behavior sets low standards • Inattention to results—focusing on personal success, status and ego before team success Positive traits of the book: 1. Easy to read & understand. 2. Good characterization & simple storyline 3. Follows the ‘make a point & tell a story’ approach. Drawbacks of the book: 1. Verbose, Repetitive & sometimes long drawn just to stay true to the story line. 2. How many corporations would encourage the principles of argument & conflict especially where senior management is concerned? 3. In a perfect world, everyone would be open, honest and sincere. Can the dynamics of human behavior be predictable with agreed principles? Conclusion: A good book to read and contemplate about. The question would be how far would anyone be willing to apply these principles without having to realize that they have shot themselves in the foot? In a world where competitiveness & politics slithers its way through the dark corners of corporate unpredictability, this book would be a lofty goal worth pursuing, however, it will continue to remain a improbable mountain to climb. Overall Rating 6 out of 10 Loy Machedo loymachedo.com

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Patrick Lencioni classified 5 dysfucntions of a team: 1. Abesent of trust 2. Fear of conflict 3. Lack of commitment 4. Avoidance of accountability 5. Inattention to result The story is little bit strange to me as the recruit or promotion of a senior management seems to be so open and become a company decision instead of teh CEO make it final. It is not important for the theme of this book, just make me feel strange when reading this section. Is that cultural difference I found? However, I woul Patrick Lencioni classified 5 dysfucntions of a team: 1. Abesent of trust 2. Fear of conflict 3. Lack of commitment 4. Avoidance of accountability 5. Inattention to result The story is little bit strange to me as the recruit or promotion of a senior management seems to be so open and become a company decision instead of teh CEO make it final. It is not important for the theme of this book, just make me feel strange when reading this section. Is that cultural difference I found? However, I would consider Lack of commitment as the most important of all. We can find many cases of poor team performance based on this. Why? they dont want to put their effort here, and they just want to have a free ride. The individual is trustworth, aggressive, but as the story say, it come to no commitment and accountability in group works. If the members of a team is coommitted and focus on the team project, the other 3 dysfunctions can be much easy to fixed when the members jump into work. Sometimes, it is putting the wrong guys in the positon, that means a gap betweeen the personell attribution to the job requirement that kill the project. Anyway, I agree with the author that a clear, reaonable objective is the first thing for the team. Then how the team leader treat the members fair is critical, especially, tasks to each person is different and very difficult to compare. And we cannot forget :you get what you measure. A good book to stimulate thinking and reflection of past experience.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Paul,

    Good book ... well, good ideas anyway. Just like I like the idea of a business novel/fable. I've just yet to see one that is written by a real writer with ... you know ... characters and action and stuff. Still, it's more interesting than the usual business book. What sets this book apart is not the sophistication of its ideas. It's not the clarity of the presentation or the detail of its implementation. Each idea on its own is commonsensical. But, the combination of ideas, in particular, the com Good book ... well, good ideas anyway. Just like I like the idea of a business novel/fable. I've just yet to see one that is written by a real writer with ... you know ... characters and action and stuff. Still, it's more interesting than the usual business book. What sets this book apart is not the sophistication of its ideas. It's not the clarity of the presentation or the detail of its implementation. Each idea on its own is commonsensical. But, the combination of ideas, in particular, the combinations of trust and true conflict while conflict leads to buy in are very helpful! In fact, the idea of seeking conflict in order to generate buy in may even be revolutionary :D Now, it would be easy to take these ideas too far ... where conflict becomes a means of displaying individual prowess, etc. But that is the nature of this world, always balancing between the alternatives. And, dare I generalize?, oh I dare ... the post-modern generation is the least personal conflict embracing generation in recent history. Just do it your way .. but don't expect me to support you in your private truth. So this book may become more and more necessary as conflict and unanimity become higher and higher values. Lencioni is definitely on to something here.

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