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The Color Purple (Great Family Reads, #3) PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: The Color Purple (Great Family Reads, #3)
Author: Alice Walker
Publisher: Published 2004 by Paperview (first published 1982)
ISBN: null
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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The Color Purple is a classic. With over a million copies sold in the UK alone, it is hailed as one of the all-time 'greats' of literature, inspiring generations of readers. Set in the deep American South between the wars, it is the tale of Celie, a young black girl born into poverty and segregation. Raped repeatedly by the man she calls 'father', she has two children taken The Color Purple is a classic. With over a million copies sold in the UK alone, it is hailed as one of the all-time 'greats' of literature, inspiring generations of readers. Set in the deep American South between the wars, it is the tale of Celie, a young black girl born into poverty and segregation. Raped repeatedly by the man she calls 'father', she has two children taken away from her, is separated from her beloved sister Nettie and is trapped into an ugly marriage. But then she meets the glamorous Shug Avery, singer and magic-maker - a woman who has taken charge of her own destiny. Gradually, Celie discovers the power and joy of her own spirit, freeing her from her past and reuniting her with those she loves.

30 review for The Color Purple (Great Family Reads, #3)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Samadrita

    I give this book 5 stars to spite the myopic David Gilmours and the V.S. Naipauls of the world who think books written by women are irrelevant. I give this 5 stars to make up for the many 1/2/3 star ratings it may receive simply because of Alice Walker's forthright, honest portrayal of unpleasant truths that are often conveniently shoved under the carpet so as not to disturb the carefully preserved but brittle structure of dogma and century-old misconceptions. And I award this 5 stars, symbolica I give this book 5 stars to spite the myopic David Gilmours and the V.S. Naipauls of the world who think books written by women are irrelevant. I give this 5 stars to make up for the many 1/2/3 star ratings it may receive simply because of Alice Walker's forthright, honest portrayal of unpleasant truths that are often conveniently shoved under the carpet so as not to disturb the carefully preserved but brittle structure of dogma and century-old misconceptions. And I award this 5 stars, symbolically on Banned Books Week as an apology for all the cowardly sentiments of the ones who misuse their power by banning books, thereby shutting out many powerful voices which demand and need to be heard. In my eyes, an author's merit lies not only in their sense of aesthetic beauty, but also in the scope and reach of their worldviews which must reflect in their craft. Alice Walker's is the voice of one such African American writer that recounts a story which not only breaches the boundaries of an issue like emancipation of women but tries to detect a common pattern in problems plaguing civilizations across continents. She gives us one horrifying glimpse after another into the lives of women ravaged by unspeakable brutalities like rape and abuse, lives searching for meaning and connection and seeking out that elusive ray of hope amidst the darkness of despair. And by the end of the narrative, she brings to light with great sensitivity, that misogyny, sexism and blind patriarchal prejudices are as rampantly in vogue in the urban, upscale sphere of American cities as they are in the intractable, untameable African landscapes. Celie and Nettie. Shug Avery, Sofia and Mary Agnes. Tashi and Olivia. All these are but different names and many facets of the same disturbing reality. If the lives of Celie and Nettie are torn apart by sexual abuse and humiliation from childhood, then Tashi and other unnamed young African girls of the Olinka tribe are victims of genital mutilation and other forms of psychological and physical torture. If the men of African American families dehumanize the female members to the point of treating them as mere care-givers and sex slaves, then the objectification of African women by the men of their families is no less appalling. And contrary to accepted beliefs, white families in America are just as easily susceptible to misogyny as the African American families are. But Alice Walker doesn't only stop at opening our eyes to the uncivilized aspects of our so-called civilized world, but also shows us how knowledge of the world and people at large, self-awareness and education can help exorcize such social evils, how it is never too late to gain a fresh perspective, start anew and how empowerment of women eventually empowers society. Dear David Gilmour, if I were a professor of English literature I'd have taught Alice Walker to my students without a shred of hesitation, because here's an author who may not possess the trademark sophistication of Virginia Woolf's lyrical prose but who, nonetheless, fearlessly broaches subjects many masters and mistresses of the craft may balk at dealing with. Alice Walker: 5 | David Gilmour: 0

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rowena

    I read The Colour Purple in my early teens, was traumatized by the graphic abuse portrayed, and vowed to never read it again. I was curious about why so many of my GR friends rated it so highly and was eventually convinced to give it another go. Years after my first read, I still (of course) have the same visceral reaction to the abuse but that no longer blinds me from seeing the magnificence of Alice Walker’s storytelling, and how she brings her characters to life. Celie is the protagonist of the I read The Colour Purple in my early teens, was traumatized by the graphic abuse portrayed, and vowed to never read it again. I was curious about why so many of my GR friends rated it so highly and was eventually convinced to give it another go. Years after my first read, I still (of course) have the same visceral reaction to the abuse but that no longer blinds me from seeing the magnificence of Alice Walker’s storytelling, and how she brings her characters to life. Celie is the protagonist of the tale. Her story is told through a series of letters written firstly to God, and then to her sister Nettie. As an abused, uneducated woman (abused by her father, husband, and step-children) who was only ever shown love by Nettie, the letters are very telling, and are the only means Celie has of expressing her feelings. I adored Celie. It really amazed me how a woman who was abused so much (sexually, physically, verbally) could still have so much love in her heart, and not be bitter. Imagine hearing things like this regularly: (Husband to Celie) – “Who you think you is? You can’t curse nobody. Look at you. You black, you pore, you ugly, you a woman. Goddam, he say, you nothing at all.” But Celie is something, and one of my favourite parts of this book is the sisterhood portrayed, especially by the enigmatic Shug, who helped Celie on her journey to self-realization. The book has strong female characters, which is another plus. I’m so glad I gave this book a second chance. Celie is a wonderful character and proof of the resilience of the human spirit. “I think us here to wonder, myself. To wonder. To ask. And that in wondering bout the big things and asking bout the big things, you learn about the little ones, almost by accident. But you never know nothing more about the big things than you start out with. The more I wonder, the more I love.”

  3. 4 out of 5

    Educating Drew

    Wow. I mean. Really. Wow. You know how there are some books and their words wrap around you like a comforting blanket? Well... This. Is. Not. One. The Color Purple rips the clothes right off of your skin, leaving you bare and vulnerable. From the first freakin' moment opening the page. You are just THERE and you can't be anywhere else but THERE. Even when you're not. Wow. Have you seen the movie? I had. I thought I was prepared. Because the movie was devastating. I remember vividly being in the house Wow. I mean. Really. Wow. You know how there are some books and their words wrap around you like a comforting blanket? Well... This. Is. Not. One. The Color Purple rips the clothes right off of your skin, leaving you bare and vulnerable. From the first freakin' moment opening the page. You are just THERE and you can't be anywhere else but THERE. Even when you're not. Wow. Have you seen the movie? I had. I thought I was prepared. Because the movie was devastating. I remember vividly being in the house that me and a couple of college friends rented, sitting there in the dark, all of us sitting on our furniture, chain smoking, drinking wine and crying. The movie didn't prepare me. Walker's words are music. Sometimes a sweet melody, but mostly a cacophony of pain and sorrow. Oh and how the characters change and grow with time, how they eventually find peace. And the dichotomy of the South and Africa? It makes me yearn to find pieces of literature that can show me the mysteries of that continent. I am incoherent and refuse to speak of the summary. It's The Color Purple! It doesn't need a summary. It is alive. It is life.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Raeleen Lemay

    Done my second book for #booktubeathon!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    "Who you think you is? he say. You can't curse nobody. Look at you. You black, you pore, you ugly, you a woman. Goddam, he say, you nothing at all." And yet, she is one of the strongest characters I have ever met in literature. Long before women began speaking up about their different experiences in the #metoo movement, Alice Walker's Celie and her sisters resist the violence and power of the men around them and go on living through the pain and frustration, only to find life worth fighting for i "Who you think you is? he say. You can't curse nobody. Look at you. You black, you pore, you ugly, you a woman. Goddam, he say, you nothing at all." And yet, she is one of the strongest characters I have ever met in literature. Long before women began speaking up about their different experiences in the #metoo movement, Alice Walker's Celie and her sisters resist the violence and power of the men around them and go on living through the pain and frustration, only to find life worth fighting for in the end. Rarely these days do I finish a book within one sitting, but this novel was impossible to put down. In a voice genuinely her own, Celie begins to tell her story of rape, loss, and forced marriage. Her loneliness is so painful that she can't even think of a recipient for her letters - except for God, which she imagines to be an older, white man, the very symbol of patriarchal power. Wherever her life takes her, she is surrounded by men who are taught from the cradle to mistreat and look down on women in order to establish their own fragile egos. While they claim to be the stronger sex, they leave it to their mothers, sisters, daughters and wives to make a living, to work for food and shelter and education. Celie's world - based on submission - changes when she encounters two women who refuse to bow their heads, who fight for their right to individual pride and happiness. In Shug, her lover, and Sofia, her neighbour, she sees the true colour of female power: the purple of queens! A mix of the passionately hot blood-red colour of happiness and the deeply painful and dark blue, purple is the essence of nature, the expression of the divine principle of life beyond the Christian God of the bible who is mainly catering to the white male authority that makes women suffer. The day Celie discovers that her long lost sister is still alive, she can finally drop the patriarchal god figure as a recipient of her letters (written to reflect on the painful expeirence of her life) and share her thoughts with somebody she loves truly and unconditionally. "Dear Nettie" - a moment of triumph caught in writing! Life is not only red happiness or blue sadness, it is purple! Therefore Celie's lover Shug is convinced that "God is pissed" whenever someone ignores the beauty of the colour purple in nature whereas he is completely absent from church. Finding spiritual support within the loving human heart is at the centre of this powerful hymn to women across the world, and while telling the story of Nettie and Celie, of Sofia and Shug, it approaches the difficult political topics of misogyny, repressed sexuality, colonialism, missionary endeavours, racism, domestic violence and poverty. Rarely have I felt a colour expressing itself so strongly in emotions! Despite the terrible circumstances of life in the Deep South in the 1930s and 1940s, it is a book about the joy of living. Confronted with the hatred of the man she is about to leave to embark on her first attempt at independent life, Celie answers: "I am pore, I'm black, I may be ugly and can't cook, a voice say to everything listening. But I'm here." And the message Alice Walker sends out to people across the world is a positive one: men and women can define their own roles, they can develop and learn and change for the better. Gender roles are not static, and there are moments of peace and friendship for anyone who dares to move out of the pattern of dominance that destroys the freedom of choice for both men and women. Recommended to the world, over and over!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kai

    “I think it pisses God off if you walk by the color purple in a field somewhere and don't notice it.” 4.5/5 stars The colour purple was devastating from page one. I started reading this without knowing much about it. I knew it had a POC main character, heard that it was about women's rights and about abuse. I heard it was a great book. But I still did not expect this. The main character's life is miserable. I still don't understand how she made it through to a certain point, because if it were me i “I think it pisses God off if you walk by the color purple in a field somewhere and don't notice it.” 4.5/5 stars The colour purple was devastating from page one. I started reading this without knowing much about it. I knew it had a POC main character, heard that it was about women's rights and about abuse. I heard it was a great book. But I still did not expect this. The main character's life is miserable. I still don't understand how she made it through to a certain point, because if it were me in her skin, I probably wouldn't have been able to stay in that skin for long. It was not an easy book, neither plot nor writing were exactly motivating. But I found so much hope in the first, and even happiness in the last chapters, that I just came to love it. Find more of my books on Instagram

  7. 4 out of 5

    Fabian

    In awe of the magnificent depths within "The Color Purple." Would rather debunk Great American Novel contenders such as Great Gatsby, On the Road, or Huckleberry Finn with this Definitive American classic novel. The steel-strong bonds of family, the global importance of friendship, and the ever-mystical soul-defining actions of sisterhood are all immortal themes that are drawn in lush exquisite, sometimes brutal, hues (the purple of a field of violets, the purple of a deepening bruise). In terms In awe of the magnificent depths within "The Color Purple." Would rather debunk Great American Novel contenders such as Great Gatsby, On the Road, or Huckleberry Finn with this Definitive American classic novel. The steel-strong bonds of family, the global importance of friendship, and the ever-mystical soul-defining actions of sisterhood are all immortal themes that are drawn in lush exquisite, sometimes brutal, hues (the purple of a field of violets, the purple of a deepening bruise). In terms of the epistolary novel (my personal faves include "Dracula" & "Where'd You Go, Bernadette," & now this one), the frailty of letters and the lost art of letter writing carry implicit feelings. They ground the novel and contradictorily make it an ethereal work of art. The writer is a true magician that even out-Faulkners Faulkner in her book filled with light and grace. P.S. the film tries its damn hardest to keep up with Walker's unique characters and their respective vernacular. For me, the line uttered by Adam at the end of the movie ("I want to know you, mama.") never fails to make me bawl.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Debra

    A Masterpiece! “I think it pisses God off if you walk by the color purple in a field somewhere and don't notice it.” ― Alice Walker, The Color Purple From the time I first read this book (I have read this many times), it has been a favorite. Walker has brought to life the story of two sisters: one a missionary in Africa and one a young abuse wife living in the south. Even though there is distance between them, there is great love, great devotion and great compassion. This book spans years as we se A Masterpiece! “I think it pisses God off if you walk by the color purple in a field somewhere and don't notice it.” ― Alice Walker, The Color Purple From the time I first read this book (I have read this many times), it has been a favorite. Walker has brought to life the story of two sisters: one a missionary in Africa and one a young abuse wife living in the south. Even though there is distance between them, there is great love, great devotion and great compassion. This book spans years as we see their lives. Celie writes letters to God and her sister. She has been abused most of her life. First by her very father who abused and raped her and gave away her/their babies. Then she is given to a man who who abuses her. This is not an easy book to read. It is sad and heartbreaking at times. There is rape, abuse, sexism, etc. There is also hope, strength, resilience, love and yes, happiness. Celie finally finds herself after being introduced to a couple of strong women. She eventually finds her inner voice and is able to find her self and her strength. But the path to getting there is long and full of obstacles - some of which are inside Celie. Through her path of finding her inner voice, she finally fells what it is like to love and be loved. To find a sense of belonging. To find God. To have the capacity to forgive. To hold onto hope and to hold it close and cherish it. In this character with see the triumph of the human spirit. Against the odds, she is able to be strong. Walker's writing is haunting, powerful and beautiful. I love his dear eyes in which the vulnerability and beauty of his soul can be plainly read.” ― Alice Walker, The Color Purple Yes, this book is hard to read at times, but there is beauty here. Such beautiful writing. The dialect may be difficult at first but keep reading, you will get the hang of it. This book is so worth the effort. Highly Recommend. See more of my reviews at www.openbookpost.com

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Color Purple, Alice Walker The Color Purple is a 1982 epistolary novel by American author Alice Walker which won the 1983 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the National Book Award for Fiction. It was later adapted into a film and musical of the same name. Taking place mostly in rural Georgia, the story focuses on the life of African-American women in the Southern United States in the 1930s, addressing numerous issues including their exceedingly low position in American social culture. Celie is a The Color Purple, Alice Walker The Color Purple is a 1982 epistolary novel by American author Alice Walker which won the 1983 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the National Book Award for Fiction. It was later adapted into a film and musical of the same name. Taking place mostly in rural Georgia, the story focuses on the life of African-American women in the Southern United States in the 1930s, addressing numerous issues including their exceedingly low position in American social culture. Celie is a poor, uneducated 14-year-old girl living in the American South in the early 1900s. She writes letters to God because her stepfather, Alphonso, beats her harshly and rapes her continously. Alphonso has already impregnated Celie once, a pregnancy that resulted in the birth of a boy she named Adam. Alphonso takes the baby away shortly after his birth. Celie has a second child, a girl she named Olivia whom Alphonso also abducts. Celie's ailing mother dies after cursing Celie on her deathbed. Celie and her younger sister, 12-year-old Nettie, learn that a man identified only as Mister wants to marry Nettie. Alphonso refuses to let Nettie marry, instead arranging for Mister to marry Celie. Mister, needing someone to care for his children and keep his house, eventually accepts the offer. Mister and his children, whose mother was murdered by a jealous lover, all treat Celie badly. However, she eventually gets Mister's squalid living conditions and incorrigible children under control. Shortly thereafter, Nettie runs away from Alphonso and takes refuge at Celie's house, where Mister makes sexual advances toward her. Celie then advises Nettie to seek assistance from a well-dressed black woman that she had seen in the general store a while back; the woman had unknowingly adopted Celie's daughter and was the only black woman that Celie had ever seen with money of her own. Nettie is forced to leave after promising to write. Celie, however, never receives any letters and concludes that her sister is dead. Shortly thereafter, Nettie runs away from Alphonso and takes refuge at Celie's house, where Mister makes sexual advances toward her. Celie then advises Nettie to seek assistance from a well-dressed black woman that she had seen in the general store a while back; the woman had unknowingly adopted Celie's daughter and was the only black woman that Celie had ever seen with money of her own. Nettie is forced to leave after promising to write. Celie, however, never receives any letters and concludes that her sister is dead. ... تاریخ نخستین خوانش: بیست و یکم ماه نوامبر سال 2010 میلادی عنوان: به رنگ ارغوان؛ نویسنده: آلیس واکر؛ مترجم: امیرحسین مهدیزاده؛ تهران، نشر نی، 1388، در 306 ص؛ شابک: 9789641851288؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان امریکایی - سده 20 م این نویسنده میگوید: جهالت بزرگترین دشمن ماست. وی میافزاید: فکر میکنم «رنگ بنفش» با عشق در ارتباط است، ما نیاز به ارتباط داریم خلاصه داستان: سِلی جکسن، دختر نوجوان سیاه‌پوستی است، که پدرش فرزندان او را به خانواده «ساموئل‌»ها می‌فروشد. خود او را نیز به آلبرت‌ جانسن گلاور، مرد سیاه‌پوست بیوه‌ ای واگذار می‌کند، که در پی خواهر «سلی»، «نتی» (بوسیا) بوده است. او با وجود آزار و اذیت مدام «آلبرت» و فرزندانش، سعی می‌کند همسر مطیعی باشد. «نتی» از خانه ی پدر فرار می‌کند، و نزد «سلی» می‌آید. اما «آلبرت» او را بیرون می‌کند. «نتی» قول می‌دهد برای «سلی» نامه بنویسد، ولی هیچ‌گاه نامه‌ ای به دستش نمی‌رسد. هارپو (پو)، پسر «آلبرت»، برخلاف رأی پدر، با دختری چاق و سرکش، به‌ نام «سوفیا» (وینفری) ازدواج می‌کند، و وقتی «هارپو» بنا به توصیه ی پدر، او را کتک می‌زند، در مقابلش می‌ایستد. «هارپو» همچنان به زورگوئی‌های خویش ادامه می‌دهد، تا اینکه «سوفیا» او را ترک می‌کند، و بچه‌ هایش را هم با خود می‌برد. در همین حین «شاگ ایوری» خواننده و محبوبه ی «آلبرت»، برای دیدن آنان می‌آید. «هارپو» خانه‌ اش را به کافه تبدیل می‌کند، و «شاگ» نیز در آنجا برنامه اجرا می‌کند. «سوفیا» با محبوب جدیدش، «باستر» (تیلیس) باز می‌گردد، و کافه را به هم می‌ریزد. «شاگ» به «سلی» (گلدبرگ) می‌قبولاند، که آن‌طور هم که فکر می‌کرده، زشت نیست، و عشق و محبت بین زنان را به او می‌آموزد. اما خودش مجبور می‌شود به خاطر پدرش که واعظ محلی آنجاست، کافه را ترک کند، و به ممفیس برود. «سوفیا» نیز به خاطر جواب رد دادن به یک زن سفیدپوست، که از او می‌خواهد خدمتکارش باشد، به زندان می‌افتد. «سوفیا»ی درمانده، مجبور می‌شود در خانه ی یک زن سفیدپوست، خدمتکاری کند. «شاگ» با همسر جدیدش، «گریدی» (گیلوری) بازمی‌گردد و پی می‌برد که «آلبرت» در تمام این سال‌ها، نامه‌ هائی را که «نتی» برای «سلی» فرستاده، پنهان کرده است. «نتی» در نامه‌ ها نوشته که همراه با «ساموئل‌ها»، و فرزندان «سلی»، «آدام» و «آلیویا»، به‌عنوان مبلّغ مذهبی، در آفریقا زندگی می‌کند. «سلی» به ممفیس می‌رود. «آلبرتِ» پیر و تنها، به رابطه ی «سوفیا» و «هارپو» حسادت می‌کند. «سلی» که خانه ی مادریش را (از مردی که فکر می‌کرد پدرش است در حالی که ناپدری‌ اش بوده) به ارث برده، تبدیل به فروشگاه لباس می‌کند. ا. شربیانی

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dannii Elle

    Despite finishing this over a week ago, I have staved off from writing a review as I feel anything I could write would not do the sublime elegance and exquisiteness of this book justice. The characters and their emotions are displayed in a raw and unapologetic way, their stories are dynamic and compelling, their plights are austere and penetrating, and the writing is evocative and exalted. I urge anyone and everyone to read this hard-hitting, powerful and corporeal book as it has such an importa Despite finishing this over a week ago, I have staved off from writing a review as I feel anything I could write would not do the sublime elegance and exquisiteness of this book justice. The characters and their emotions are displayed in a raw and unapologetic way, their stories are dynamic and compelling, their plights are austere and penetrating, and the writing is evocative and exalted. I urge anyone and everyone to read this hard-hitting, powerful and corporeal book as it has such an important story to tell!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Aubrey

    I'm glad I got to this before my school curriculum did, cause all I would've had instead of Celie and Shug and Nettie was Miss Eleanor Jane prancing in front of the classroom at 70 to 80 years old, full of pity and the hell of good intentions that hasn't rendered the speaking of the N word despicable to her despite all proof of the contrary. Sure, I'm glad the prof didn't shaft this woman of color writer like she had with others near the beginning, but I have to wonder about those students for w I'm glad I got to this before my school curriculum did, cause all I would've had instead of Celie and Shug and Nettie was Miss Eleanor Jane prancing in front of the classroom at 70 to 80 years old, full of pity and the hell of good intentions that hasn't rendered the speaking of the N word despicable to her despite all proof of the contrary. Sure, I'm glad the prof didn't shaft this woman of color writer like she had with others near the beginning, but I have to wonder about those students for which this class assignment was their first reading. Did they love it despite the prof's best measures of academia? Did they hate it because the latter exceeded? You'd never know, for all the space they're given in class for their own thoughts and feelings and opinions of why the world goes round with this particular book inside it. The teacher may know how to spell feminism and womanism and patriarchy, but all that only matters if the taught have been allowed to give a damn. I can't keep track of how many times someone's said that they're not an expert as an excuse for shutting down the conversation since my return to college. It makes me wonder whether there's an actual legal threat in the back of their minds saying, no, that's not what you were hired for. No, that's not what we're allowing you to make a living off of. No, you haven't taken the requisite courses in theology and gender, or gone through the path of learning and socially prescribed biological sex at birth, to become a priest or a teacher or anyone who can say anything against the weight of the institutionalized norm. Every so often I can poke them past that and into more interesting realms of epistemology and pedagogy, the fancified lingo for knowledge of knowledge and teaching of teaching, but I can't be too frustrated. It took Celie, nowhere near the borderline of safety known as the middle class making a living off the university, decades of not killing others or herself to get a sense of what being quiet about those things, not thinking about those things, not stripping down those things to the bare bones of structure and finding the cornerstone lacking, is worth in the long run. I won't say I'll be modifying my tune about this in a decade or so, cause that's what living without that stable brain chemistry millions take for granted until another white male shooter murders another school room of children requires as an option, but still. If there are certain things that are not horrors or brutal promises of bigotry that you refuse to say to yourself even in the dead of the night for the simple reason that you think yourself unworthy of questioning them, why? The world's not what it used to be with the economy tanked and the Internet forcing practically everything into the light and USA fascism looking to lead the most accurate replay of WWII with Muslim populations and Syrian immigrants the world has ever seen. The label "expert" is a gimmick. A scam. A signifier for being a certain way and paying a certain amount of money that allows in a return a proportionate amount of money and the right to be called such by the Wikipedia article I will be copy pasting into your GR author profile. You don't want to end up like my Miss Eleanor Jane of a professor, do you? That's all I ask. --- 2/28/2014 Purple is for pride, didn't you know? Purple is the royal pride to boot, the one that can afford full protection and wears its self-assumed precious state on its sleeve. There's some in love and some in hate and some, perhaps the most, in the calm reserve that takes what it gets and builds itself a home. For purple is also piety, and the potential of the purpling palimpsest is breathtaking. If you look up 'purpling', you will find both a transformation and an act of love, the latter grounded in gendered stereotypes but, for our purposes, will be pruned of its connotations and left as a simple affection. No lust, no obsession, nothing of the usual pride of desiring and feeling oneself more than worthy of receiving reciprocation. That was stripped before the pages even began, a summary of rape and pain and separations all along the spectrum of self and self-worth. It is not a mark of the author, but the reader, if this beginning is more believed in than the final ending. Too pat and contrived they say, too much that a being both woman and black would take thirty years to find peace of mind. Or perhaps it's the duality that so hard to swallow, two sisters in such disparate circumstances each discovering a measure of resolve upon which to thrive. Perhaps it's the lack of fight and final 'success' on each and every frontier that the readers object to, the concept that you can't always get what you want and yet. And yet. And yet in the face of all the hate and straightened circumstances, two girls become wizened lovers of life. Through the weaving of cloth and of thought, each discover their methodology of creation, remembering where they came from and going forward nevertheless. They forgive, they relish, they come to grips with the facts of sexism and racism and colonialism and deconstruct their God accordingly. They are not even the only ones, as myriad family and friends inspire and are inspired by these two souls, traversing their own ways in the sorrow and joy that always accompanies the search for personal truth. A time for anger, a time for acceptance, and the prodigal others all along the path. What matters here is not the means by which they achieve their ends, or that they achieved them at all. What matters is the thought enabled by fruitful discovery, the meanderings of the mind over what it means to find value in existence day in, day out. The majority of literature was penned by those blessed by all varieties of sociocultural windfalls, so it should be no surprise when characters find their philosophical footing as a result of fortuitous regeneration. Decry the believability all you like, but if that little was enough for you to forget the life-affirming themes galore, grown through every slow and subtle machination of time and circumstance, be sure to treat the rest of your readings accordingly. I guarantee a sharp decrease in once favored pieces if you're honest, or objective, if that's the vernacular with which you appease yourself. I think us here to wonder, myself. To wonder. To ast. And that in wondering bout the big things and asting bout the big things, you learn about the little ones, almost by accident. But you never know nothing more about the big things than you start out with. The more I wonder, he say, the more I love. There are no name drops or modes of thought approved by academia here, but if you're truly open minded, you will recognize the mixing and melding of universal experience without any need for labels. This is as fine a contemplation of small winners in the midst of brutal reality as any, a flowering of humanity with full knowledge of every level of high and low, all the more worthy of attention for its status as a rare breed of literature. The latter has no affect on quality, but in terms of building a common humanity on the backs of pride and piety, on the steps of believing the self worth having and finding the others worth cherishing, in the color purple, it is worth everything.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Maxwell

    This was fantastic. I am so glad I finally read it after having known about it for so long and never having been assigned it in school. It’s beautifully written. Celie’a voice is so strong and all of the characters are well developed. I especially loved Shug and Sofia. And now I’ve got to see the film.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Ashleigh

    The language was harsh at first but once the flow arrived it was swift. Hardships were told in stride and empathy makes the reader want good things to happen to a few of the characters. And then, good things happen to them but they still aren't happy but they now seem content. This book was fun to read with surprisingly happy nuances described during tragic conditions.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Flor

    “El color púrpura” es un novela epistolar, que trata sobre la dura vida de Celie, una mujer norteamericana de raza negra, que vive en el sur de Estados Unidos a principios del siglo XX. No voy a escribir sobre la trama en sí porque terminaría haciendo spoilers. Lo que sí quiero destacar, es la evolución que hay en varios personajes, y la cantidad de emociones que me produjo leer esta historia, ya que aquí no todo es drama, también hay notas de humor, romance y salseo.!!! Jaja Me pareció muy inte “El color púrpura” es un novela epistolar, que trata sobre la dura vida de Celie, una mujer norteamericana de raza negra, que vive en el sur de Estados Unidos a principios del siglo XX. No voy a escribir sobre la trama en sí porque terminaría haciendo spoilers. Lo que sí quiero destacar, es la evolución que hay en varios personajes, y la cantidad de emociones que me produjo leer esta historia, ya que aquí no todo es drama, también hay notas de humor, romance y salseo.!!! Jaja Me pareció muy interesante los temas que abarca este libro, entre los que se destacan: el racismo, la eslavitud, la religión, el machismo, la violencia de género, la desigualdad de derechos, y la discriminación. Gracias a mis amigos de Goodreads por recomendármelo.!!! Es uno de los mejores que leí este año !! 😊 Mi personaje preferido: SOFIA Por último, les dejo las frases que más me impactaron: ”Mientras pueda decir D-I-O-S sabré que hay alguien conmigo.” ”Desde que nos casamos no hace más que pensar en hacerme obedecer. Él no quiere una esposa. Él quiere un perro.” ”Los blancos nunca escuchan a la gente de color. Si acaso, lo justo para poder decirte lo que tienes que hacer.” ”¿Quién te has creído que eres?, me pregunta riendo. Mírate. Eres negra, eres pobre, eres fea, eres una mujer. Vamos, que no eres nada.”

  15. 5 out of 5

    F

    My gran got me this book years ago and just getting round to reading it now. It was a quick read but really emotional. Had elements in it i didnt expect. The Africa parts bored me and were very slow.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Monica

    Wow such an amazing book! Although many parts were so difficult to read, so heart breaking, its a story that sticks with you. I loved when the story expanded to include Nettie's life as a missionary. Celie's courage to endure all the hardships and losses, including the hardest loss of her sister, makes many of today's problems seem so insignificant to me. This is truly a remarkable book that I highly recommend!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Scarlet Cameo

    Lectura con el grupo PopSugar Reading Challenge en Español Cuando comencé este libro mi primer pensamiento fue "este libro quiere hacerme llorar", lo cual no siempre es bueno, hay libros que buscan manipular al lector de manera obvia para que se lamente de lo que le sucede al protagonistas, pero pasadas unas cuantas páginas me di cuenta que ese no es el objetivo de este libro, sino que nos mostraba como inicio el cambio en Celie, como ella se convirtió en mujer. En principio la historia es bastant Lectura con el grupo PopSugar Reading Challenge en Español Cuando comencé este libro mi primer pensamiento fue "este libro quiere hacerme llorar", lo cual no siempre es bueno, hay libros que buscan manipular al lector de manera obvia para que se lamente de lo que le sucede al protagonistas, pero pasadas unas cuantas páginas me di cuenta que ese no es el objetivo de este libro, sino que nos mostraba como inicio el cambio en Celie, como ella se convirtió en mujer. En principio la historia es bastante triste. nos muestra los abusos por los que Celie pasa durante su vida en el hogar materno, paterno y conyugal, siendo su único apoyo y felicidad su hermana pequeña, Nettie. Contada en forma de cartas la escritura no es suave, tampoco es demasiado decorada, las condiciones de vida y educación de Celie y Nettie quedan expuestas en la escritura, pero dan la sensación de ser personales dentro de su precariedad inicial y, conforme Celie evoluciona, se vuelve más prolija, pero no en el estilo de una persona educada sino de alguien que esta aprendiendo. Esto no sólo hace que puedas sentir cariño por Celie sino que inconscientemente la consideres tu amiga, como si fuera a ti a quien escribe, y terminas queriéndola, esperando que su vida cambie (view spoiler)[y emocionándote increíblemente cuando vez que realmente logra cambiarla (hide spoiler)] . Pero ella no es la única protagonista, en su viaje de crecimiento conocemos a otras dos mujeres que le demostrarán no sólo el valor de la amistad, sino el valor que ella misma tiene. Sofia y Shug Avery son dos mujeres con las cuales Celie conoce el amor, la necesidad de valorarse a si mis, y que el querer a alguien no significa que debas aceptar cualquier cosa, incluso con ellas el lector las quiere, por momentos no caen bien, pero al final encontramos que son extraordinarias personas, y mujeres que sufren el dolor de ser mujeres en una época de machismo, y de ser negras en un lugar donde el racismo es no sólo extremo sino que es la norma. Un libro que escrito de manera intencionadamente brusca se siente excelente, presenta un trasfondo bien construido, una maravillosa construcción de personajes, y más que nada nos muestras protagonistas admirables que no son perfectas. Si a esto le sumamos un final conmovedor, que deja una sensación de plenitud y felicidad es difícil ponerle pegas al libro, y aun así no diría que todo el mundo debería leerlo, al tocar temas polémicos es fácil sentirse ofendido o molestarse por lo que se esta leyendo, así que antes de comenzar a leerlo se debe saber que la historia va de mujeres que sufren a causa de los hombres, así sin más, ese es el tema central, y de hecho las protagonistas dicen claramente que ellos son la causa de sus males, así que no lo tomes personal, son situaciones especificas, no se esta diciendo que todos los hombres son el demonio reencarnado.

  18. 5 out of 5

    AMEERA

    2.5

  19. 4 out of 5

    Puck

    “I believe God is everything, say Shug. Everything that is or ever will be. And when you can feel that, and be happy to feel that, you’ve found him.” The Color Purple is a powerful book with an amazing cast of strong female characters, but in my opinion, it was 100 pages too short. I can certainly see how this book made such an impact by its discussion of (painful) topics and its feminist messages, but it was mainly the second half that brought this book down to its 3 star-rating. The first half “I believe God is everything, say Shug. Everything that is or ever will be. And when you can feel that, and be happy to feel that, you’ve found him.” The Color Purple is a powerful book with an amazing cast of strong female characters, but in my opinion, it was 100 pages too short. I can certainly see how this book made such an impact by its discussion of (painful) topics and its feminist messages, but it was mainly the second half that brought this book down to its 3 star-rating. The first half of this book was wonderful. I loved reading about Celie, Shug Avery, Sofia, and Mary Agnes (Squeak) and how each of them found the strength to stand up for themselves. Their attempts as black women to fight the sexism and (male) oppression present in their society are met with anger and a lot of protest, but the women all help each other to improve their lives. Alice Walker does an amazing job at weaving timeless feminist ideas together with themes like LGBTQ-culture, the struggle with domestic abuse, and female sexuality. A running topic through the book is Celie’s relationship with God, who for a long time is her only confidant. Thanks to an important talk with Shug – one of the most important talks in this book – the author shows not only how racism and sexism has affected Celie’s image of God (as an old, white man) but also how ‘wrong’ it is to search for God in a church. “Here’s the thing, say Shug. The thing I believe. God is inside you and inside everybody else. You come into the world with God. But only them that search for it inside find it.” The second half of this book however, when Nettie’s letters from Africa take over and the narrative gets divided between Celie and Nettie, was when things started going downhill for me. The book changes from a coming-of-power story into an epistolary novel, which killed the story’s energy and realness. Because there is no sense of time in these letters, no conformation that the sisters receive each other’s messages. For all we know Celie and Nettie are writing these letters to themselves with each other in mind. So when the end of this book came, and we suddenly find out that ± 20 years had passed, I was shocked. When did time went by so quickly?! And apart from the adventure described in those letters – an interesting tale about former African slaves returning to Africa and the culture clash that shows itself there – the story is told in an incredibly slow pace and without any vigor. Walker wants to make so many statements that Celie’s storyline gets drowned under the author’s messages about oppression, sexism, and racism. This way the second half of this book lacks the power that was so present earlier, making reading about Nettie’s missionary work in Africa and Celie’s sowing business in Georgia a drag for me. So although I’m a great fan of all the female characters in this novel and how they all found love and happiness, the second half was a letdown. The story had no impact anymore and Celie’s ending was a little too good to be true (I especially disliked how she ended things with Mister). I do, however, certainly recommend this story. Walker’s story is filled with excellent messages about feminism, faith, the power of sisterhood, fighting abuse, and learning how to stand up for yourself. I give this book 3 stars because I think the author overdid herself in the second half of the novel, but overall I found this a very powerful book. “Man corrupts everything, say Shug. He on your box of grits, in your head, and all over the radio. He try to make you think he everywhere. Soon as you think he everywhere, you think he God. But he ain’t. Whenever you trying to pray, and man plop himself on the other end of it, tell him to go lost, say Shug. Conjure up flowers, wind, water, a big rock. But this hard work, let me tell you. Man been there so long, he don't want to budge. He threaten lighting, floods and earthquakes. Us fight. I hardly pray at all. Every time I conjure up a rock, I throw it. Amen.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Russ

    I first read this in high school, and really enjoyed it. I re-read it in 2007, and enjoyed it just as much the second time. First thing I should mention: This is not the book for you if you object to blunt language about sexuality, and strong language in general. The themes in this one are very real, and very shocking. However, if you can get past that, the story does offer some very touching moments. The story, in a nutshell: Celie, a poor black girl living in Georgia, overcomes poverty, sexual o I first read this in high school, and really enjoyed it. I re-read it in 2007, and enjoyed it just as much the second time. First thing I should mention: This is not the book for you if you object to blunt language about sexuality, and strong language in general. The themes in this one are very real, and very shocking. However, if you can get past that, the story does offer some very touching moments. The story, in a nutshell: Celie, a poor black girl living in Georgia, overcomes poverty, sexual oppression, racial oppression, and the separation of herself and her sister. She goes through several lifetimes of pain and hurt, but ends up a strong woman in the end. The entire book is told through diary entries, which I think makes things quite interesting. It skews the story toward the views of those doing the writing, but of course those are the people we are supposed to trust in the novel. Favorite part: The end of the book. It touched my heart after reading everything that came before. Favorite character: Albert. He's not a good man by any stretch of the imagination, yet he does change a lot during the book. His story makes me think there's hope for just about any lowlife.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Maria Espadinha

    O Cúmulo Do Machismo Já alguma vez vos ocorreu pensar sobre o Cúmulo do Machismo? Pois bem, se lerem este livro irão chegar a uma fórmula mais ou menos assim: É um marido maltratar a mulher com tal grau de brutalidade, que esta e a amante dele se tornam melhores amigas e ambas optam por vê-lo pelas costas, pirando-se juntas!... Como corolário dessa misoginia extrema, a única mulher da vida de tal homem, passa a ser um fantasma feminino, com quem flirta ocasionalmente, para alguns passos de dança de O Cúmulo Do Machismo Já alguma vez vos ocorreu pensar sobre o Cúmulo do Machismo? Pois bem, se lerem este livro irão chegar a uma fórmula mais ou menos assim: É um marido maltratar a mulher com tal grau de brutalidade, que esta e a amante dele se tornam melhores amigas e ambas optam por vê-lo pelas costas, pirando-se juntas!... Como corolário dessa misoginia extrema, a única mulher da vida de tal homem, passa a ser um fantasma feminino, com quem flirta ocasionalmente, para alguns passos de dança descontraídos! Possivelmente, numa tentativa fantasiosa de auto-esquecimento! ;) Hehe, já 'tou' a inventar!... A cena da dança com o fantasma fêmea não é daqui - é no filme! ;) No livro, esse tal marido boçal apanha tamanho choque ao ver-se duplamente abandonado, que opta por reinventar-se um pouco! Bem... a verdade é que irá reinventar-se bastante mais que um pouco! Um 'man' que falha como marido e amante, tem muito trabalhinho pela frente, como é fácil imaginar!... Além de ser um tratado sobre machismo, "A Cor Púrpura" versa também sobre a luta intemporal entre bem e mal, mostrando como a Força pende para o lado dos Sentimentos Nobres, como a Solidariedade, a Amizade e o Amor. A Vitória pertence-lhes, pois são eles que cavam o Túnel da Libertação - aquele por onde se vai insinuando a Cor Púrpura da Vida :)

  22. 4 out of 5

    K.D. Absolutely

    Walker's characterization is one of the best I've encountered so far in my reading. There are many memorable characters in this book, The Color Purple that I will probably remember for a long time. Walker's characters are not caricatures as they are well-developed and multi-dimensional, i.e., not only with both their good and bad sides revealed to the readers but also the reasons why they behave or think that way. Even the secondary characters like Squeak or Mary Agnes contributes in bringing ou Walker's characterization is one of the best I've encountered so far in my reading. There are many memorable characters in this book, The Color Purple that I will probably remember for a long time. Walker's characters are not caricatures as they are well-developed and multi-dimensional, i.e., not only with both their good and bad sides revealed to the readers but also the reasons why they behave or think that way. Even the secondary characters like Squeak or Mary Agnes contributes in bringing out the nature of the many main characters such as: Celie, Albert, Sophia, Shug Avery and Harpo. There are many themes that Walker tackled in this book: slavery, education and literacy, violence, religious belief and colonialism. [For this reason, this is a very good book of group discussion.] Although, in my opinion, they are too many and too complex for a 295-page book composed of 90 short letters. This attempt left most of the complexities untouched and the insights inexact or half-baked. For example, Shug telling Celie that "God is in the trees" and "It is okay to enjoy the things that God created including sex" (even without the mentioning anything about marriage or love) can be misleading to readers especially the young and the uninformed. However, the effort was there and I still enjoyed having all those theme presented to me while reading. When I finally closed the book, I did not feel unsatisfied really but you know that feeling when you are standing in front of the buffet table and you still have that small space in your tummy and you don't want to go for dessert because it is fattening? You have tasted all the courses but you want to go for a second small serving and you don't know which one to take? I had that feeling this morning while constructing this review in my mind. The other small complaint that I felt this morning when I finished the book was that the beginning was dramatic and totally engaging. The middle part was full of twists, revelations and endeavors. But the ending was something that felt contrived and unrealistic in my taste. How could it be that happy after all what the characters have gone through? It all became a bit of an escapist book for me instead of what I thought it to be as deep and literary. Not that I wanted to dampen the mood of the readers or not to picture hope in the gloom of Georgia during that sad phase in American history but hey, if life is fair then we should have been beaming, smiling and even giggling everyday, right? However, this is not Walker's fault and I know that this won the Pulitzer and National Book Award on the same year and being the first black woman recipient of those, Walker made history but still, I prefer my favorite novels to be realistic and sincere. I don't care if I end up sad and neurotic for few days after reading a book as long as it is breathtakingly beautifully written. Sad na kung sad. Thanks to Christine, Blue and Po for being my reading buddies for this book. Thanks also goes to Angus and Jzhunagev for the encouragement to pick and read this. Thank you, God, for not sending me to earth as a black man during the early 20th century in Georgia. I would not surely know how to behave as a black man if I got married to somebody like Sophia. :)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    What an incredible experience this is. It's such a hard book about persecution and yet it's also about redemption. The book starts off in the darkest of places and the light is shed more and more as the story goes on. This story is about the tough side of the human condition. One of my favorite lines is and I paraphrase, "I may be ugly, I may be nothing but a woman, I may even be a bad cook, but I'm here. I'm here." You can feel the freedom in those words. This book is about the freedom of the s What an incredible experience this is. It's such a hard book about persecution and yet it's also about redemption. The book starts off in the darkest of places and the light is shed more and more as the story goes on. This story is about the tough side of the human condition. One of my favorite lines is and I paraphrase, "I may be ugly, I may be nothing but a woman, I may even be a bad cook, but I'm here. I'm here." You can feel the freedom in those words. This book is about the freedom of the spirit and about freedom. We can be enslaved to our gender, our color, our society, our nation and especially to our way of thinking. Freedom is possible from all those things. I think Miss Celie has to overcome all these. Much of the movie, which I saw many times starting in the 80s follows the first 3/4 of the book. The book focuses on Celie's journey. It does not go into the bits about Africa and Nettie. I like that about the movie and yet, it did add something to the story. The climax to me is when Celie finally stands up to Mister and walks out of his house. That is the climax. Each character has their own voice and the characters are very deep. The writing is superb. It changes as the characters grow and age. This story holds so much wisdom and experience. It is a spiritual experience and there is much philosophy and religion spoken of in these pages. I love how Alice talks about God wants to be loved as we want love. God is in every living plant and they all want our love and attention. Again, I paraphrase poorly and it is a lovely idea. In the book, Celie leaves Mister and goes off to live with Sug. They have a deep relationship. I am so glad that Celie has a chance to know what love is. I would love it if no one ever had to suffer the way Celie did; it was terrible. I'm glad that Alice Walker could share the gift of what Celie learned with the world even being made up. I can't believe it took me so long to read this. It touched me deeply. It is a powerful movie and it is a powerful Book. It ripples the truth like a wave in a pond going out into the world. I'm very thankful to have had the experience of this book and to see a completely different way of life.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Hadrian

    I've had an awfully difficult time writing about this book, so I'll keep my thoughts to a few short points which others have doubtless said better elsewhere. The Color Purple is a series of letters written by a poor Southern black woman, Celie, to God and her sister. Because of who she is, she's placed at the bottom rung of American society due to her race, gender, semi-literacy, and her status as a target of gruesome violence. The writing style is controlled study in dialect. The deliberate choi I've had an awfully difficult time writing about this book, so I'll keep my thoughts to a few short points which others have doubtless said better elsewhere. The Color Purple is a series of letters written by a poor Southern black woman, Celie, to God and her sister. Because of who she is, she's placed at the bottom rung of American society due to her race, gender, semi-literacy, and her status as a target of gruesome violence. The writing style is controlled study in dialect. The deliberate choice of an epistolary format allows Walker to carefully construct Celie's development through her writing and her choice of words. Celie's first awkward fumblings slowly transform into a more fluid cadence as she finds some quiet dignity in her life. But even in the earliest segments, raw emotion burns through. To say nothing of the infamous first page. The setting is a study in contrasts. Rural Georgia in the 1920s is a rough place to be poor, black or a woman (to say nothing of all of these), and Walker firmly establishes this setting, especially in contrast with the scenes in West Africa. The Color Purple is deeply emotional and matters for many reasons. I feel bad recommending such a strong book so half-heartedly, but this might be because so much praise has already been said about it. This is one of those cases where all that praise is deserved. 4.5/5.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sidharth Vardhan

    “It is the very mark of the spirit of rebellion to crave for happiness in this life.” - Henrik Ibsen The African village Natie visits in this book had this ritual where members are initiated to community though facial scarring. Something easily accepted by most villagers, but with which embarrasses a more conscious Tashi: “ Tashi is, unfortunately, ashamed of these scars on her face, and now hardly ever raises her head.” It is a novel about people reacting to very similar scars given to them by so “It is the very mark of the spirit of rebellion to crave for happiness in this life.” - Henrik Ibsen The African village Natie visits in this book had this ritual where members are initiated to community though facial scarring. Something easily accepted by most villagers, but with which embarrasses a more conscious Tashi: “ Tashi is, unfortunately, ashamed of these scars on her face, and now hardly ever raises her head.” It is a novel about people reacting to very similar scars given to them by society. Some of them protest. To someone like Sophia, the instinct to rebel comes naturally. Then there are others who must need be inspired. Celie, the protagonist, falls in this latter category. You will have to look hard to find a character in a worse social position. She is poor, mostly uneducated, ugly, homosexual and a woman. You know how we just buy a book and just start reading it– ya, don’t do that with this one. It has the most heart wrenching opening ever. Abused by life, or more correctly, by men who should have been responsible for her happiness; she accepts it all as fate. It just doesn’t occur to her to protest. “The most common way people give up their power is by thinking they don't have any.” - Alice Walker (not this novel)  If she hasn’t already protested, it was because she suffered a far worse poverty- feeling of being unloved. Remember Mother Teresa, “The most terrible poverty is loneliness and feeling of being unloved.” She did find this capital of love when she grew close to other women. And so finally she asserts her existence. “I’m pore, I’m black, I may be ugly and can’t cook, a voice say to everything listening. But I’m here.” No longer able to bear it, she is angry with God. Initially, I thought that writing the book in form of letters to God is just a literary trick but it was more than that. Celie stopped writing to God, being angry with him. ” If he ever listened to poor colored women the world would be a different place“ and rather choose to write to Natie instead, another symbol of how women can support each-other. Her anger also shows up in her misandry causing her to say things like ” Anyhow, I say, the God I been praying and writing to is a man. And act just like all the other mens I know. Trifling, forgitful and lowdown.” and Take off they pants, I say, and men look like frogs to me. No matter how you kiss ’em, as far as I’m concern, frogs is what they stay. You know, it hurts. Anyway, here comes my favourite part. In the end Celie forgives God. Celie’s anger was just another thing stopping her from enjoying her life. It is not enough to protect yourself from injustice and submission, even more important is to continue searching for happiness, to celebrate the beauty of life: “I think it pisses God off if you walk by the color purple in a field somewhere and don't notice it.” The problem with Celie and many other women taking roles expected of them by their culture is that their lives are based around men: “All her young life she has tried to please her father, never quite realizing that, as a girl, she never could.” Which means they won’t notice the color purple: “ You have to git man off your eyeball, before you can see anything a’tall.” (It really hurts.) Despite all the fem. talk (oh Devil, I badly need some gangster guy or screwed detective book), the novel is more than a feminist story. A lot of it is about the unnatural relation between oppressors and oppressed whether it is racism or sexism. The oppressor in both cases doesn’t want the oppressed to get education and won’t talk to later except concerning work. Then too, neither of them look into other party's eyes as if of guilt. And the oppressor suffers too (to lesser extent of course); who seem similarly struck with their role. As Celie’s husband confessed in the end when they had become friend-ish “ I’m satisfied this the first time I ever lived on Earth as a natural man.” * “Here us is, I thought, two old fools left over from love, keeping each other company under the stars.” “But all things look brighter because I have a loving soul to share them with.”

  26. 4 out of 5

    Candi

    Heart-stirring and powerful, The Color Purple is truly inspiring - I don’t know what took me so long to get around to reading this novel! Most readers will know the background to this one, either through the book or the movie. So, I won’t rehash the plot here, but I will share some quick thoughts. My feelings were all over the place with this one. Sometimes outraged, often saddened, occasionally amused, but ultimately I felt joyful as I reached the final page. When I initially started this book, Heart-stirring and powerful, The Color Purple is truly inspiring - I don’t know what took me so long to get around to reading this novel! Most readers will know the background to this one, either through the book or the movie. So, I won’t rehash the plot here, but I will share some quick thoughts. My feelings were all over the place with this one. Sometimes outraged, often saddened, occasionally amused, but ultimately I felt joyful as I reached the final page. When I initially started this book, I was hesitant about the epistolary format and struggled a bit with the dialect. However, such misgivings quickly melted away and I was drawn right into Celie’s life and her story. I cheered her on the whole way as she suffered through unthinkable abuse and eventually developed her own voice and a strength that I thoroughly admired. As she discovered what it was like to love and be loved, as she cherished the hope of one day seeing her sister again, as she learned to understand God and what God meant to her personally, and as she learned the gift of forgiveness, Celie has reserved a place in my mind as one of the most treasured of heroines. Alice Walker has managed to accomplish something that is not easy to do – she turned this reader into a bit of a blubbering fool by the end of the novel! This is one book that I will be placing on my shelf with the intention to read it once again. “I think us here to wonder, myself. To wonder. To ast. And that in wondering bout the big things and asting bout the big things, you learn about the little ones, almost by accident. But you never know nothing more about the big things than you start out with. The more I wonder, he say, the more I love.”

  27. 4 out of 5

    Louize

    Since its release in 1982, The Color Purple had been a subject of frequent censorship due to its violent sexual content and language. Not to mention the casual and constant change of partners, lesbianism and the polygamous society of the Olinka tribe. Written in epistolary form, the book is a series of letters addressed to God through which our protagonist, Celie, found solace in her chaotic life. She exists in a time of male dominance and fixed gender roles. “Well sometime Mr._____ git on me pr Since its release in 1982, The Color Purple had been a subject of frequent censorship due to its violent sexual content and language. Not to mention the casual and constant change of partners, lesbianism and the polygamous society of the Olinka tribe. Written in epistolary form, the book is a series of letters addressed to God through which our protagonist, Celie, found solace in her chaotic life. She exists in a time of male dominance and fixed gender roles. “Well sometime Mr._____ git on me pretty hard. I have to talk to Old Maker. But he my husband. I shrug my shoulders. This life soon be over, I say. Heaven last all ways.” Celie, a barely educated black woman, was abused and impregnated twice by her supposedly father at the age of 14. She was then forced to a loveless marriage with a widower named Albert, a father of four children, who treat her like a servant and an occasional sexual convenient. She was inarticulate and has no power to assert herself or resist her abuser. "He beat me like he beat the children. Cept he don't never hardly beat them. He say, Celie, get the belt... It all I can do not to cry. I make myself wood. I say to myself, Celie, you a tree. That's how come I know trees fear men." As the story unfolds, the subject of feminism was gradually introduced. Although an ambiguous female relationship was present, it was Shug Avery’s self-assured but loving character that bolstered Celie to resist oppression and gain selfhood. Even the secondary characters, from which we do not hear directly, have a great influence through their open willfulness and unconventional perspective; such as Sofia, Mary Agnes and Nettie. The alliance, friendship and support these women weaved among them proved their resilience and worth. “I’m pore, I’m black, I may be ugly and can’t cook, a voice say to everything listening. But I’m here.” Three (3) types of oppression were visible in the story: paternalism, sexism, and racism which Ms. Walker did a marvelous job of expressing through epistolary manipulations without being too emotional. It is also worth mentioning that although feminism is a strong subject here, it is not “anti-male” in the least. At the last chapters, Ms. Walker gave room for the men of the story to redeem themselves. It was justifying how Albert and Harpo are changed by the strong women around them, finally able to see women's true worth beyond sex and domestic slavery. "The world is changing, I said. It is no longer a world just for boys and men." Despite the injustice presented in this book, indelibly the nature of God was narrated in a non-fixated way. It implied that God is for and in everyone. All it takes is a little self-searching. “Here’s the thing, say Shug. The thing I believe. God is inside you and inside everybody else. You come into the world with God. But only them that search for it inside find it. And sometimes it just manifest itself even if you not looking, or don’t know what you looking for. Trouble do it for most folks, I think. Sorrow, lord. Feeling like shit” The novel is effective because of the authenticity of the narration. Most knows that letter-type writings imply the importance of self-expression. But we have to understand that expression requires a listener and validation. It had been subtly implied in this book that God was Celie’s most attentive listener and in the end made concrete validations for her. You saying God vain? I ast. Naw, she say. Not vain, just wanting to share a good thing. I think it pisses God off if you walk by the color purple in a field somewhere and don’t notice it. What it do when it pissed off? I ast. Oh, make something else. People think pleasing God is all God care about. But any fool living in the world can see it always trying to please us back. Yeah? I say. Yeah, she say. It always making little surprises and springing them on us when us least expect. (Thanks to Jzhun, a friend and group moderator, for giving the time to discuss this book with me last meet up.)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Adira

    I can't believe I ever gave this a three star rating. I'm glad I reread this book now that I'm older and can appreciate what's being written. It really is a masterpiece.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stepheny

    I’ve had The Color Purple on my TBR list for a long, long time. I had had it on my kindle for almost 2 whole years prior to me reading it. But, I’m a mood reader and I wait for the book to call to me. I started it, put it on hold while I did a couple buddy reads and finally got around to finishing it. There was only one thing in the whole book that bothered me and it was the character that is consistently referred to as Mr.____. Throughout the whole book his last name is omitted and I still don’t I’ve had The Color Purple on my TBR list for a long, long time. I had had it on my kindle for almost 2 whole years prior to me reading it. But, I’m a mood reader and I wait for the book to call to me. I started it, put it on hold while I did a couple buddy reads and finally got around to finishing it. There was only one thing in the whole book that bothered me and it was the character that is consistently referred to as Mr.____. Throughout the whole book his last name is omitted and I still don’t really understand why. I found it annoying and distracting. All I could do to stop the nervous tic I was developing was fill in the blank. I tried out a few names before settling with calling him Mr. S in my head. I had a hard time understanding what the purpose of this book was. I found myself trying to figure out what the author was trying to tell me; what the point of the book was. I understood what was happening in the book, that wasn't the problem- but where was the story going? What’s the message? The book starts out with our MC, Celia writing letters to God. These letters tell us a little bit about her and her life. We find out early on that she has had two children…both fathered by her own father. And then she is essentially sold to her new husband Mr.___ or Albert as he is later referred. Her children are taken from her to be raised by another woman and her sister leaves the house altogether not wanting to be targeted next. Mr. ____ beats Celia from time to time but as long as she does what she is there to do he leaves her alone. She has to suffer through him cheating on her openly and being downright nasty to her personally. And then everything changes. Shug, the woman with whom Mr._____ is happily having his affair with is sick and with no one to take care of her. Mr.____ brings her home and ironically Celia nurses her back to health. For me, this was the turning point in the story. I was not fully invested in it until this happened. Shug’s character was my favorite. I understood her even if I didn't agree with her choices. And her relationship with Celia was what changed my mind about her. She was kind and loving and taught Celia a lot. The narration changed about halfway through the book when Celia finds out Mr.___ had been hiding her sister’s letters from her. Celia begins to read her sister’s letters and then begins writing back to her. It was about at this point in my reading that I finally figured out this book. It’s the perfect analogy for life. There is simply no other way to explain it. And in figuring that out, I ended up loving this book more than I thought I would when I started it. The Color Purple tells us of the up-hill battles we all will face at some point in our lives. It shows us that we all face these battles but some fight harder ones. The paths we take in life are our own. At the end of the day we all have to find a way through. I’d like to now share a few of my favorite quotes from this book. The dialect was a little hard to get through at times but I understood it was necessary. The meaning behind the words was the important part. “Oh, Celie, unbelief is a terrible thing. And so is the hurt we cause others unknowingly.” “I think us here to wonder, myself. To wonder. To ask. And that in wondering bout the big things and asking bout the big things, you learn about the little ones, almost by accident. But you never know nothing more about the big things than you start out with. The more I wonder, the more I love.” “I think it pisses God off if you walk by the color purple in a field somewhere and don't notice it.” And lastly, “Here's the thing, say Shug. The thing I believe. God is inside you and inside everybody else. You come into the world with God. But only them that search for it inside find it. And sometimes it just manifest itself even if you not looking, or don't know what you looking for. Trouble do it for most folks, I think. Sorrow, lord. Feeling like shit. It? I ask. Yeah, It. God ain't a he or a she, but a It. But what do it look like? I ask. Don't look like nothing, she say. It ain't a picture show. It ain't something you can look at apart from anything else, including yourself. I believe God is everything, say Shug. Everything that is or ever was or ever will be. And when you cam feel that, and be happy to feel that, you've found it.”

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mohamed Al

    لدى كل منا مجموعة من الأصدقاء، لكل منهم اهتمامات وهوايات غريبة، أو هكذا نعتقد حتى تأتي تلك اللحظة التي نلجأ فيها إليهم لطلب الاستشارة في موضوع يقع في صلب اهتماماتهم التي كنا نراها سخيفة وغريبة ومدعاة للسخرية. أحد أصدقائي لديه هوس بكل ماله علاقة بتحليل الشخصيات، بدءًا من الأبراج وطقوس الولادة وحتى الألوان والاسماء. غالبًا ما كنت أقلب أي موضوع يفتحه معي حول الهالات والطاقة "التشاكرا" التي تنبعث من روح الإنسان إلى سخرية وهزل. لذلك عندما جاءت اللحظة التي سألته فيه عن دلالات اللون الأرجواني، نظر إلي نظ لدى كل منا مجموعة من الأصدقاء، لكل منهم اهتمامات وهوايات غريبة، أو هكذا نعتقد حتى تأتي تلك اللحظة التي نلجأ فيها إليهم لطلب الاستشارة في موضوع يقع في صلب اهتماماتهم التي كنا نراها سخيفة وغريبة ومدعاة للسخرية. أحد أصدقائي لديه هوس بكل ماله علاقة بتحليل الشخصيات، بدءًا من الأبراج وطقوس الولادة وحتى الألوان والاسماء. غالبًا ما كنت أقلب أي موضوع يفتحه معي حول الهالات والطاقة "التشاكرا" التي تنبعث من روح الإنسان إلى سخرية وهزل. لذلك عندما جاءت اللحظة التي سألته فيه عن دلالات اللون الأرجواني، نظر إلي نظرة شماتة، وقرفص جالسًا كما تفعل مريم نور، وأشار إلي بيده على طريقة الرهبان البوذيين لكي أثني ركبتيّ وأنهل من درره التي كنت أعتقد سابقًا أنها ليست سوى محض هراء. كان سبب لجوئي إلى هذا الصديق هو أنني تساءلت كثيرًا، وأنا أقرأ الكتاب، عن سبب اختيار المؤلفة للون الأرجواني كعنوان للكتاب، وهو اللون الذي كانت بطلة الرواية مهووسة به، إلى درجة طلائها لجدران غرف منزلها بهذا اللون، وشرائها لتحف وتماثيل مصبوغة به، بل وقولها في أحد فصول الرواية بأن "الله سيشعر بالاستياء إذا مر أحدهم بحقلٍ ولم تخلب لبه الزهور الأرجوانية". بدأ صديقي محاضرته قائلاً، بعد أن تنتحنح ليضفي نوعًا من الأهمية على معرفته؟ بأن اللون الأرجواني ارتبط منذ القدم بالآلهة والروحانيات والعبادات. وغالبًا ما يمتاز الأشخاص الذين ينجذبون لهذا اللون بالغموض والحزن والتردد في اتخاذ القرارات، ولكنه مع ذلك يحفز الأشخاص للوصول للأفكار العظيمة والقيم العليا. قاطعته بدهشة وأنا أسأله إن كان قد قرأ رواية اللون الأرجواني، فأجابني بالنفي، ثم أكمل ظنًا منه بأنها رواية أعكف أنا على تأليفها، أنصحك إن كان هنالك مجال بأن تغير اسمها إلى اللون الأصفر، واستطرد شامتًا لأن هذا اللون يليق بك فهو لون الخديعة والتكلّف والهمّ والغمّ. كنت على وشك أن أشكره، لولا أنني شعرت بالإهانة، فتظاهرت بأني لم أقتنع بالهراء الذي ردده على مسامعي حول اللون الأرجواني وأنني ما سألته إلا لأسخر منه ومن معتقداته الغريبة، بينما كنت في داخلي مندهش لقدرته على تحليل شخصية بطلة الرواية بهذه الدقة والعمق دون أن يكون قد قرأ هذه الرواية. أؤكد لكم يا أصدقائي بأن تحليل صديقي للون الأرجواني ينطبق كثيرًا بل وكثيرًا جدًا على ملامح شخصية "سيلي" المترددة والبائسة التي دأبت تكتب رسائل لله، ثم توقفت عن ذلك بعد أن خذلها وخيب آمالها، ولكنها سرعان ما عادت تكتب إليه بعد أن وجدت الله الحقيقي لا المزيف الذي كان يستقبل رسائلها بالتجاهل والنكران. كما أؤكد لكم بأن اللون الأصفر لا يليق بي بتاتًا.

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