Cart

Romeo and/or Juliet: A Chooseable-Path Adventure PDF, ePub eBook


Hot Best Seller
Title: Romeo and/or Juliet: A Chooseable-Path Adventure
Author: Ryan North
Publisher: Published June 7th 2016 by Riverhead Books
ISBN: 9781101983300
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

27209455-romeo-and-or-juliet.pdf

In order to read or download eBook, you need to create FREE account.
eBook available in PDF, ePub, MOBI and Kindle versions


reward
How to download?
FREE registration for 1 month TRIAL Account.
DOWNLOAD as many books as you like (Personal use).
CANCEL the membership at ANY TIME if not satisfied.
Join Over 150.000 Happy Readers.


Shakespeare’s plays weren’t meant to be read. They were meant…to be played. What if Romeo never met Juliet? What if Juliet got really buff instead of moping around all day? What if they teamed up to take over Verona with robot suits? This choose-your-own-path version of Romeo and Juliet—packed with fun puzzles, secrets, and quadrillions of possible storylines—lets you decid Shakespeare’s plays weren’t meant to be read. They were meant…to be played. What if Romeo never met Juliet? What if Juliet got really buff instead of moping around all day? What if they teamed up to take over Verona with robot suits? This choose-your-own-path version of Romeo and Juliet—packed with fun puzzles, secrets, and quadrillions of possible storylines—lets you decide where the plot goes every time you read. You might play as Romeo, or as Juliet, or as both of them at the same time. You might even unlock additional playable characters! That’s right. We figured out how to have unlockable characters in books.

30 review for Romeo and/or Juliet: A Chooseable-Path Adventure

  1. 4 out of 5

    lisa

    this is super fun! on my first readthrough as juliet i ended as a spinster pirate, so A++ adventuring really.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Maja (The Nocturnal Library)

    New York Times bestselling Romeo and/or Juliet is a choose your own adventure type of deal, a ridiculously entertaining take (or takes, since there are plenty of them) on a classic that’s pretty ridiculous in and of itself. A classic it may be, but the word timeless doesn’t apply to this particular work, and the older I get, the more annoyed I am by Romeo and Juliet both. Ryan North took the famous tale and explored its weaknesses, but he also added pretty much everything that crossed his mind, f New York Times bestselling Romeo and/or Juliet is a choose your own adventure type of deal, a ridiculously entertaining take (or takes, since there are plenty of them) on a classic that’s pretty ridiculous in and of itself. A classic it may be, but the word timeless doesn’t apply to this particular work, and the older I get, the more annoyed I am by Romeo and Juliet both. Ryan North took the famous tale and explored its weaknesses, but he also added pretty much everything that crossed his mind, from ghosts and robots to naked, sword-wielding fathers. The best thing by far is that you make your own choices as you go, from the character you want to play to the path you want to take. I can’t begin to imagine the amount of work that was required to put this book together, but the effort paid off. From the very first page Romeo and/or Juliet is an exercise in hilarity. If you choose to play as Romeo, prepare to be a lovesick teen obsessed with ridiculous poetry. As Juliet, you will be a ripped, self-obsessed girl interested in muscles and boys. Juliet is a bit of a pushover, always ready to do everything her mother tells her to, but you’re there to make things better and push her in more dangerous directions. It’s your game after all! Some of the paths end quickly, always with painful and ridiculous deaths. On some of them Juliet and Romeo don’t even meet, and on some they meet but things go in strange directions. Sometimes the book pushes you to change characters, usually when one becomes boring or the other’s life seems more eventful. In any case, North addresses his players the entire time, not hiding the fact that he’s the one actually running the narrative. Regardless of where you end up, you’ll jump right back to the beginning eagerly. I tried retracing my steps several times, but it didn’t always work. I got tangled up more times than I can count. The easiest thing to do is laugh until you cry at Romeo’s and/or Juliet’s misfortune and go right back to kill them again. Not all paths have tragic endings – there are a few possibilities for a happily ever after as well. After a time, though, you begin hoping for the other kind, mostly because they’re far more entertaining. Romeo and/or Juliet is the weirdest, funniest book I’ve held in my hands in ages. Sometimes it gives the impression of trying too hard, but overall you’ll want to take this journey again and again until you discover them all.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Ideja mi se svidja, i voleo sam ovakve knjige kada sam bio mali. E sada problem u ovoj izvedbi moze biti da nisam vise mali ali jednostavno na duze staze ova knjiga je dosta naporna za citanje. Humor je ok ali nivo razbijanja cetvrtog zida ala Dedpul je stvarno previse i covek uopste nemoze da se upusti u pricu. Nekako je suvise sve okrenuto na zez. Ima par fora, i vise nego par, ali kao sto rekoh na duze staze smara. Ima potencijala al meni nije leglo previse.

  4. 5 out of 5

    TL

    Monthly buddyread with Melissa :) --- Melissa's review here -- 2.5 stars (extra rating for the artwork/pictures) Not bad overall, parts of it were fun. I tried a few different paths to see what would happen and took turns as Juliet and one as Romeo. There were some funny moments but most of the writing felt awkward to me... maybe aiming at a younger audience? (Speaking only for the paths I took) Story got old quick though *shrugs* Not sure how to judge my progress but I (and Melissa) got through a fai Monthly buddyread with Melissa :) --- Melissa's review here -- 2.5 stars (extra rating for the artwork/pictures) Not bad overall, parts of it were fun. I tried a few different paths to see what would happen and took turns as Juliet and one as Romeo. There were some funny moments but most of the writing felt awkward to me... maybe aiming at a younger audience? (Speaking only for the paths I took) Story got old quick though *shrugs* Not sure how to judge my progress but I (and Melissa) got through a fair bit methinks. Wouldn't recommend the Nurse storyline... it was neat that it proceeded like an old-style video game but nothing special overall. I'll have to try another "choose your adventure" type novel again one day... this was my first since I was a kid.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    I think that I'm just really bad at Choose-Your-Own-Adventure type books. My decisions almost always lead me to an early death or a premature resolution. I played this several times and never got beyond more than a chapter's worth of pages. I finally ended up just going through the book out of order, looking for the promised plot twists and hilarious illustrations but honestly, I was a bit disappointed. I just didn't find the book to be that funny. It was over-the-top and forced. Not my kind of I think that I'm just really bad at Choose-Your-Own-Adventure type books. My decisions almost always lead me to an early death or a premature resolution. I played this several times and never got beyond more than a chapter's worth of pages. I finally ended up just going through the book out of order, looking for the promised plot twists and hilarious illustrations but honestly, I was a bit disappointed. I just didn't find the book to be that funny. It was over-the-top and forced. Not my kind of humour maybe. I loved the concept, but didn't like the execution. I think that what it comes down to is that this really just isn't my kind of book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lexie

    I haven't gone through every path yet, but I've gone through quite a few. Mostly as Juliet (except when, as Juliet, I pretended to be Romeo trying to seduce Juliet, that is me, but then somehow became Romeo, now me, trying to seduce Juliet, now no longer me.) so I feel safe reviewing this a bit. This is basically the best kind of fun to have with your friends--especially book lovers, English majors or Shakespeare lovers. North has an irreverent tone that, while it doesn't always work completely w I haven't gone through every path yet, but I've gone through quite a few. Mostly as Juliet (except when, as Juliet, I pretended to be Romeo trying to seduce Juliet, that is me, but then somehow became Romeo, now me, trying to seduce Juliet, now no longer me.) so I feel safe reviewing this a bit. This is basically the best kind of fun to have with your friends--especially book lovers, English majors or Shakespeare lovers. North has an irreverent tone that, while it doesn't always work completely well with the actual jargon/lines from Shakespeare, does make it fun to read and run through multiple times in one sitting. As a Choose Your Own Adventure book sometimes the paths seem utterly contrived...but North admits this will happen bc come on he can't account for EVERY variable as genuine experience. --- Your name is Juliet (or Romeo). You live in Old-Timey Verona, where we've set our scene, and are either too milquetoast to tell your parents no or in love with the idea of being in love, thus setting into motion a tale of star-crossed lovers. Or not. I mean Juliet, if you just say 'yes' to your mother you can go and marry boring old Paul Rudd...I mean Paris and Romeo you have a chance to go and get that Rosalind girl you spend most of your opening pining after for some reason. Or Juliet you can run off and be a pirate! Romeo you can...I have no idea what you can do otherwise, I refused to follow his path because omg he is so annoying. Juliet gets choices like "run far far away from everything for adventures" while Romeo gets "do you go chat up the girl?". Of course you could be that person who follows the story as Shakespeare wrote it (North helpfully has little hearts next to the choices that will lead you down that tragic angsty path). Personally I vote you say "no" as soon as you to your Mother, run away, chat up some guy at a bar, and somehow make your fortune on the high seas instead. (can you tell I love the pirate ending for Juliet?). North plays fast and loose with the time period, the play, the characters, the character motivations, Shakespeare's intentions and pretty much everything else you can think of for him to play fast and loose with. Even if you follow the "canon" path for R&J, North is at pains to be like "are you really sure that's a great idea? Here's a better one!" to tempt you towards a more satisfying ending. Its actually more of a chore to ignore his glib asides, irreverent commentary and anachronistic observations to complete the "canon" version then it is to go with the flow towards a different ending. Each segment is short enough that if you want to play this as a party game (which I heartily recommend) you can, passing the book around to each person as choices are made. Each ending's illustration is alternately absurd (a muscle-bound, fiercely grinning Juliet swinging a sword while in a dress!) or sweet (Juliet and a beau living in martial bliss far away from the idiots in Verona), breaking up the text. I did flounder at first with the page set-up however; this isn't traditionally numbered. As some snippets are barely a line or more then a page, you have to be careful when moving from choice to choice to make sure you are at the BEGINNING of that choice (sometimes on the previous page). Overall this was a fun, inventive way to spend my time. Like the OMG Shakespeare books I think they may also be a good way to get reluctant readers into the classics. Look, even though I love Twelfth Night and Midsummer's Night Dream and Macbeth - they are NOT easy to get through. Especially if you go for the really old text and not the slightly updated so at least they don't have weird punctuation and apostrophes everywhere text. For reluctant readers, or readers who struggle with reading due to attention span or not reading English fluently (for whatever reason), books like this can help bridge that gap. North does a fine job of presenting the actual text (especially if you follow the canon path), while making it accessible to everyone and giving context. Paired with a unit on Shakespeare in Modern Times or some such thing, I think this could be a fine teaching tool. Or do like me, break out the vodka (or rum) and have a ridiculously fun time with your friends. Either way, this is a winner of a book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Book Riot Community

    I’ve been wanting to read the Hamlet version of this, so when I saw this, I grabbed it out of curiosity and because I love the artists involved in these books. It was way more wacky and hilarious than I expected. I found myself flipping back and forth to read every path. — Jessica Yang from The Best Books We Read In December 2016: http://bookriot.com/2017/01/03/riot-r...

  8. 5 out of 5

    justonemorechapter

    This was such a fun book! I was eyeballing it for a few weeks before I picked it up as I wasn’t sure whether I’d be into the whole “choose as you go” thing. Turns out, I am! “Romeo And/Or Juliet” was a hilarious, smart, and entertaining book I will definitely be re-reading. I read the book in about 30 different ways, some ending after only ten pages, some making it much farther through the book. This novel was completely unpredictable, and because of that I was never bored. One of my favourite th This was such a fun book! I was eyeballing it for a few weeks before I picked it up as I wasn’t sure whether I’d be into the whole “choose as you go” thing. Turns out, I am! “Romeo And/Or Juliet” was a hilarious, smart, and entertaining book I will definitely be re-reading. I read the book in about 30 different ways, some ending after only ten pages, some making it much farther through the book. This novel was completely unpredictable, and because of that I was never bored. One of my favourite things about “Romeo And/Or Juliet was the humour. While reading, I literally laughed out loud – more than once I might add – which is pretty rare for me. Sure, I might smile and blow out of my nose really hard if I read something funny, but this book had me full on ugly laughing. Not only were the characters hilarious, but the interpretation of the original play, the crazy endings, and the overall stories. The plot twists were plentiful, and incredibly silly- the good kind of silly. At the start of the book you decide whether to play as Romeo or Juliet (I chose Juliet). I should mention that it did take me a couple of early deaths to get the hang of the “pick as you go” thing, but after a bit I figured it out. My one piece of advice is to USE A BOOKMARK. I’m one of those readers that usually doesn’t use a bookmark. I generally try to remember the page, but I usually end up rereading a few pages before finding my spot- it’s never bothered me. The problem is, things rarely go in chronological order while reading “Romeo And/Or Juliet”, so you often find yourself jumping from the 40th part to the 18th then up to the 67th… this wouldn’t be a problem if you use a bookmark. If you’re like me, though, you’ll waste a lot of time restarting much farther behind then you should be. I figured that a bookmark was necessary pretty quick, but just save yourself the trouble and use a bookmark when you read this one. If you’re looking for a light, endlessly entertaining read, I very much recommend “Romeo And/Or Juliet”. The familiarity with the original play puts the novel inside your comfort zone, but still manages to challenge it. -R

  9. 4 out of 5

    Selene

    I am not big on Romeo and Juliet but this was hilarious (mostly because it just made fun of them the entire time).

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mattia Ravasi

    Video review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKKp7... Star-rating systems are inherently ridiculous (said the guy who ranks books on YouTube), but here in particular those three stars are really a 5 and a 1 at the same time. This book is as much fun as sitting on your hand till it loses all sensibility, yet it's somehow hilarious and exciting too. Is it good interactive fiction? NO! Is it worth a spin? Absolutely.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Hilarious choose-your-own-adventure book! Just as I used to do with the ones I'd take from the library as a child, I read every single possible option. Nowadays it's easy using screenshots to do this. When I was a kid, I had to use a confusing mass of color-coded post-it notes. Isn't technology wonderful? This book is particularly hilarious if you remember Romeo and Juliet very well. I wouldn't think that I'd remember it all that well because I haven't read it since high school. But that time I r Hilarious choose-your-own-adventure book! Just as I used to do with the ones I'd take from the library as a child, I read every single possible option. Nowadays it's easy using screenshots to do this. When I was a kid, I had to use a confusing mass of color-coded post-it notes. Isn't technology wonderful? This book is particularly hilarious if you remember Romeo and Juliet very well. I wouldn't think that I'd remember it all that well because I haven't read it since high school. But that time I read in in high school, I was playing the nurse in an elaborate school production of it, and it turns out that I remember a great deal of it (despite close to two decades of that dream where you have to perform the play again for some reason and you don't know the lines). An example of a hilarious joke in this book is: His smooching was pretty good! Certainly competent, with no small amount of passion, though also strictly according to the beats and patterns laid out in Kiss Me, Kate: Kate “Kissable” Minola Reveals Her Ten Steps to Perfect Kissing Every Time. “You kiss by the book,” you say. It's just way funnier if you remembered that she says "You kiss by the book" after they kiss the first time. That's by no means the funniest part. I loled so very much reading this. It makes fun of the ridiculousness of the original story hardcore. Let me give you a clue: any time you decide to choose to, you know, CHILL THE FUCK OUT AND WAIT A MINUTE, or TELL THE TRUTH your fate improves. Decide not to get hitched right away? Good idea. Decide to stop and pick some flowers on the way to Juliet's grave? The day is saved! Decide to just tell the parents that you two are in love? Yay! Bliss for all! Whether you like the original R&J or not, this book is an immense pleasure to read. So consider reading it! It costs like $5 on Kindle. If you know me IRL and want to borrow this book from me, Kindle lets you lend your books out to people, so don't hesitate to ask!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jeannette

    If you like Choose Your Own Adventure books, you will probably enjoy this gamified version of Romeo and/or Juliet. North provides a great many paths to take with a variety of endings from the original tragic one to completely-laughable-and-almost-unrelated-to-the-actual-story ones (I lost it laughing at Romeo's stint as a maid! I still don't know why that's so funny!). In that sense, it's either a lot of fun or a great deal of stress, depending on what you were looking for in your adventure. I p If you like Choose Your Own Adventure books, you will probably enjoy this gamified version of Romeo and/or Juliet. North provides a great many paths to take with a variety of endings from the original tragic one to completely-laughable-and-almost-unrelated-to-the-actual-story ones (I lost it laughing at Romeo's stint as a maid! I still don't know why that's so funny!). In that sense, it's either a lot of fun or a great deal of stress, depending on what you were looking for in your adventure. I personally was looking for a middle ground, where the author takes a lot of time to craft a variety of endings, but doesn't lean overly heavily on the humor and gimmick of the choose-your-path nature of the book. In some places, I got that, but not across the board. This might be a result of my stress at these types of books anyway (I HAVE to know as many of the endings as possible!), but also the fact that I was reading it on a deadline for book club and podcast recording. This is probably a book left best in small doses that one reads for a brain palate cleanser from time-to-time. There is some really fun art in a few places though, so even if you don't read it, you might want to flip through and see a few pictures. Some of my favorite parts include Romeo the maid, Juliet the pirate, a film noir detective version of Rosaline, drop-ins from other Shakespeare plays, and mini versions of Twelfth Night, A Midsummer's Night Dream, and MacBeth.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Maryam

    Actual rating 3.5

  14. 5 out of 5

    Wanda

    2.5 stars This was a fun idea and I really wanted to love it. It reminded me of many of the books that I bought from Scholastic Books during grades 6 and 7, puzzle books, mystery books, that a child could go through multiple times and still find new treats by taking different turns. I don’t know how many times I started through this choose-your-own-adventure book, trying to actually follow the Bard’s version of the story, only to get distracted by goofy story lines that I just couldn’t pass by. Un 2.5 stars This was a fun idea and I really wanted to love it. It reminded me of many of the books that I bought from Scholastic Books during grades 6 and 7, puzzle books, mystery books, that a child could go through multiple times and still find new treats by taking different turns. I don’t know how many times I started through this choose-your-own-adventure book, trying to actually follow the Bard’s version of the story, only to get distracted by goofy story lines that I just couldn’t pass by. Unfortunately, goofy was the general standard of the various branchings and the writing was a great disappointment. Less silliness and more depth would have been welcome. I still don’t know if it was even possible to get to the traditional ending of the play. I lost interest in trying after about a dozen attempts.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Forsyth

    Move over, No Fear Shakespeare. Ryan North's mashup of "Choose Your Own Adventure" novels and the Bard's most famous play is approximately 271 times more compelling, humorous, and enlightening than any Coles Notes rip-off. The genius of this book is in laying out very clearly which choices to pick to follow Shakespeare's play - if you want, you can essentially just read an updated version of the tale, replete with sassy modern commentary, or you can play out how some seemingly small changes to t Move over, No Fear Shakespeare. Ryan North's mashup of "Choose Your Own Adventure" novels and the Bard's most famous play is approximately 271 times more compelling, humorous, and enlightening than any Coles Notes rip-off. The genius of this book is in laying out very clearly which choices to pick to follow Shakespeare's play - if you want, you can essentially just read an updated version of the tale, replete with sassy modern commentary, or you can play out how some seemingly small changes to the story could have much different outcomes (if only Romeo had stopped to pick up some flowers for Juliet's tomb...) I was on board pretty much from the jump, where a choice to have brunch results in much better lives for all concerned, but it just keeps building (and branching) in delightfully unpredictable ways. North clearly knows the play, and his winking asides inform as much as they gently mock. This was a perfectly serviceable 4 star review, and then I "unlocked" a "secret character" path that is so genius, I have to elevate this to a 4.5. Well played, Mr. North.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    A+ for concept, but I didn't much like the execution. Tries way too hard to be funny, which makes it all fall flat for me, and the writing isn't particularly good.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kalin

    Another send-up in the spirit of To Be or Not To Be: A Chooseable-Path Adventure (though Juliet is much less rad than Ophelia). Captures a few subtle logical deficiencies in the original. Like: “What?” Romeo says. “I just met you, dude!” you say. “Yesterday. At, like, midnight. I’ve known you for less than twenty-four hours.” “But I love you! This is romance! I love you and I love romance!” Romeo says, a little frantically. “I like you too, Romeo, but I can’t marry you today. So, um . . . sorry?” yo Another send-up in the spirit of To Be or Not To Be: A Chooseable-Path Adventure (though Juliet is much less rad than Ophelia). Captures a few subtle logical deficiencies in the original. Like: “What?” Romeo says. “I just met you, dude!” you say. “Yesterday. At, like, midnight. I’ve known you for less than twenty-four hours.” “But I love you! This is romance! I love you and I love romance!” Romeo says, a little frantically. “I like you too, Romeo, but I can’t marry you today. So, um . . . sorry?” you say. “You were going to marry me a second ago,” he says. “Changed my mind,” you say, and kiss him on the cheek. “If you love me this won’t be a huge deal, okay? Come on man, it’s not like I’m running out on a wedding we’ve been planning for months. I’m running out on a wedding you got my nurse to invite me to a few hours ago.” “IT IS A HUGE DEAL!” Romeo shouts. He jumps down into the audience area and kicks over a chair. “I was gonna get married!!” “Romeo, buddy, calm down,” you say. “YOU calm down!” he says. “You—you can’t say you’ll marry someone and then not marry them!” “So we should get married out of—what, inertia? OBLIGATION?” you say. “YES!” Romeo shouts. “Look, you’re obviously not yourself, and I didn’t think you’d get this upset,” you say. “I’m sorry, but I’m going home. We can talk about this later.” You leave Romeo there. When you get home you explain what happened to Angelica, who honestly kinda seems more upset about it than you are. The next morning, the word “HARLOT” is mysteriously painted on your castle’s exterior walls. The day after that, “JULIET IS A” is added above it. The day after that “LET ME BE CLEAR, WHEN I SAID” is added before it, and “I ACTUALLY MEANT THAT SHE NEEDS TO BE MORE OF ONE. SHE’S NOT ENOUGH OF A HARLOT RIGHT NOW AND I WOULD PREFER IF SHE WERE HARLOT-ER. SIGNED, ROMEO.” The day after that your dad gets the walls cleaned. He also pays a bunch of people to go over to Romeo’s house and beat him up. “OKAY GEEZ SORRY” is painted on your walls the next day. And you never hear from Romeo again. Later on, in college, you’re at a party and the conversation gets to old relationships. For the first time you decide to break out the story of Juliet and Her Romeo: AKA, That One Time I Was Engaged for Almost a Whole Day. Your friends start giggling as you tell the story, and before long you’re giggling too. Everything that happened felt so important when it was going on, but now that you’ve got some distance, it really does sound like a joke. Romeo left your party to hide in the bushes outside your house? He proposed to you through your NURSE? He tried to get his friends to bring over a SEX LADDER? Your friends are laughing, and you’re laughing too, and before long you’re laughing so hard you’re struggling to breathe. You’re laughing the way people who were drowning but somehow made it back to shore laugh as they lie faceup on the beach, the blinding sun in their eyes, their muscles exhausted and screaming. That is to say, thankfully. THE END (One of a many, of course.) It's also educational in the extreme: We talk about sex and you learn a heck of a lot! You can’t believe not only what you didn’t know, but what you didn’t know you didn’t know. You’re really glad we had this talk. You know what? I am too! “Wait,” you say as we’re wrapping up, “I have a question. What does it mean when a—” You pause, embarrassed, but I figure out what you’re asking and then answer it to everyone’s satisfaction. “And how do you—” you say. “I mean, if someone wanted to, how could they—” and again I figure out your question and answer it really, really well. You’ve learned so much!! And full of freedom: You see Romeo’s hand grab the top of your balcony, and in a panic, you dive under your covers to hide. You peek out a few seconds later and see Romeo there, entering your room. “Hey there, beautiful,” he says. “Hey yourself, handsome,” you say. “You’re a little late, so I went to bed. It’s pretty cold under here.” You pull back the covers a little. “I could use some company.” Juliet, Romeo has been INSTA-SEDUCED. Dang! You pulled it off! And yes, this is it, gentle reader. This is the moment you’ve been waiting for. Here is the only reason you picked up this book in the first place, because you knew this scene had to be in here somewhere, if only you just somehow made the right choices to find it. Welcome . . . to the CHOOSE-YOUR-OWN SEX SCENE. >>> Choose-your-own sex scene!! I CAN’T WAIT.<<< Haha what? No that’s . . . that’s fine. Skip over to when the sex is done, please. Subtle HINT: pick the FIRST option. Then you get: (view spoiler)[Alright! To get started, go to your bookshelf (or, if this is the only book you own, to your local library or bookstore. Also, if this is the only book you own: hey, thanks! I’m flattered) and pick up any other book with a sex scene in it. Then, while reading that sex scene, mentally substitute in the correct names, genders, body parts, interests, fluids, and catchphrases for yourself and your partner! Enjoy! And remember: it’s YOUR CHOICE. You can choose any other sex scene in the entire universe! My gift to you, reader. Go crazy. Have as many or as few sex scenes as you want. When you’re done, we’ll continue! But no rush. Take as much time as you need. I don’t judge! I’ll just be standing here with my back turned until you’re ready. (hide spoiler)] Finally, it finally settles the question of why God would let bad things happen to good peepz: You turn the combined mental effort of every being on the planet towards this task. Never in history have so many minds worked towards a single purpose, all striving with their entire being towards it. And thousands of years later, you do it. Objects in motion don’t tend to stay in motion unless you will them to. Apples don’t fall from trees unless you decide that, yes, gravity is also going to affect them in this picosecond too. An entire cosmos of choices flows through you: nothing happens without your explicit consent. You are the totality of being. You are better than a mere god. You have become The Chooser. Naturally, this insane level of micromanagement takes up all your time, so you decide to let life go back to making its own decisions. You’re much too busy making sure each proton in everyone’s bodies doesn’t decide to decay into pions and positrons at the same time for absolutely no reason. The universe comes of age, and the life inside it begins to wonder what sort of god would rule over a universe where bad things happen to good people, and you’re all, “Wow oh geez sorry your THIRD DOG died at age SIXTEEN which is ONE HUNDRED AND TWELVE IN FRIGGIN’ DOG YEARS, I guess I was too busy making sure EVERY SUN DIDN’T EXPLODE AT THE SAME TIME, THANKS FOR NOTICING HOW THAT DIDN’T HAPPEN BY THE WAY??” What follows below is a reaaaally spoiling spoiler. You have been warned. (view spoiler)[There's an unlockable character with a postscript/postmortem route. Her voice is on another level entirely. Kudos to Ryan North; if he ever decides to write noir, I'm on. (hide spoiler)]

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lara

    I think I'm done with this one for now. I just can't seem to get past the beginning of the story, and I never really liked Romeo and Juliet anyway, and I just don't find this book as funny or surprising as To Be or Not To Be: A Chooseable-Path Adventure, and now I'm just bored. I think it's a case of, okay, I get it, but the joke's been done before and let's move on. You know? But other people on here seem to be loving it, so what do I know?

  19. 4 out of 5

    Hazel (Stay Bookish)

    It's my first time ever reading a choose your own path book and Ryan North made it a ridiculously fun experience. As cool as the idea of the whole thing is and despite the adorable comical illustrations, I think there were too many paths and not enough time spent on each one so I got tired quite earlier than expected and didn't care to explore all the options anymore. That said, I did explore a handful though and was delighted about how I kept on getting happily-ever-after scenarios!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Valerie

    Super entertaining! I haven't read a "choose-your-own-adventure" since I was a kid, so this was a very pleasant experience. The humor, the style, the 4th wall that practically didn't exist - all awesome. Definitely going to check out other books of Ryan North's.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Anelis

    Do yourselves a favor and keep playing this untill you discover the secret character, it makes the experience even better! I loved North's previous book so much that this one almost crumbled under the weight of my expectations. The two are so similar that it felt as if there weren't that many new ideas in it. Don't get me wrong, it's still amazing, witty, funny, charming, feminist and exciting. But it doesn't take your breath away like the first one did. Maybe it's because I read them fairly clos Do yourselves a favor and keep playing this untill you discover the secret character, it makes the experience even better! I loved North's previous book so much that this one almost crumbled under the weight of my expectations. The two are so similar that it felt as if there weren't that many new ideas in it. Don't get me wrong, it's still amazing, witty, funny, charming, feminist and exciting. But it doesn't take your breath away like the first one did. Maybe it's because I read them fairly close to one another. If I'd waited, let's say, a year after reading To be or not to be, I might have loved Julied and/or Romeno just as much. But some of the glamour was lost. It's still a great book though.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Veronika

    This is what I call a purely fun and light read. Picking out different choices for the characters - especially Juliet, because I liked her more - and seeing them get the happy ending(s) Shakespeare never thought to give them was amazing. Romeo and/or Juliet, with its interactiveness and casual, full of slang writing, was just what I needed after my latest bookish disappointment. This will surely be a book I'll revisit later on to check out how else these characters' story could end besides the c This is what I call a purely fun and light read. Picking out different choices for the characters - especially Juliet, because I liked her more - and seeing them get the happy ending(s) Shakespeare never thought to give them was amazing. Romeo and/or Juliet, with its interactiveness and casual, full of slang writing, was just what I needed after my latest bookish disappointment. This will surely be a book I'll revisit later on to check out how else these characters' story could end besides the couple of versions I've read so far.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Beth Honeycutt

    Definitely 4.5 stars! My students kept asking what I was reading because I laughed out loud many times:) I don't think I've ever read a "choose your own adventure" book but this was so fun! I know I didn't hit every path, but I did try to stray from the original R&J story often.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Atlas

    "Juliet," your mom says, "don't you think this surprise mandatory arranged marriage is the most wonderful news??" Do you: Run past her, tear out of the house and never look back, or Say "yes mom" automatically * * * * 4 / 5 I picked this up when it was on sale at Waterstones on a whimsy and I have not been disappointed. This choose your own path adventure is jam packed with hilarious plotlines, gorgeous illustration, and bundles of fun. If you've never "read" a choose your own path book, essentially "Juliet," your mom says, "don't you think this surprise mandatory arranged marriage is the most wonderful news??" Do you: Run past her, tear out of the house and never look back, or Say "yes mom" automatically * * * * 4 / 5 I picked this up when it was on sale at Waterstones on a whimsy and I have not been disappointed. This choose your own path adventure is jam packed with hilarious plotlines, gorgeous illustration, and bundles of fun. If you've never "read" a choose your own path book, essentially you read some text and then it offers you a couple of options of things to do and you turn to the corresponding page. I would recommend you have had a reasonable acquaintance with Romeo and Juliet before buying this, otherwise I doubt that you would find it so amusing. With at least a hundred different endings, you never really finish a book like this. The writing is fairly decent, though it is rather "juvenile". There's a lot of use of teenage slang, bullet points, random capitalisation and such like, which some may find off-putting. Personally, as a fully grown adult, I found it added to the hilarity. Another addition I enjoyed was Ryan North made Juliet really into bodybuilding and lifting weights, whilst Romeo becomes your typical teenage boy even more explicitly than in the original text. If you are a Shakespearean purist, this probably isn't the book for you! The illustrations are drawn by a few different artists, including a personal favourite Noelle Stevenson, and they range from beautiful to hilarious. Each ending has its own picture and they truly enhance the reading experience. There are lots of little easter eggs for readers that are familiar with a few other of Shakespeare's plays. One of my endings involved Juliet teaming up with Ophelia to enslave the entire world, another "playthrough" landed me in A Midsummer Night's Dream, in a book within a book type scenario. There's also a nice little comic involving Pyramus and Thisbe. Regarding the story lines themselves, you can follow an approximation of the real Romeo and Juliet all the way to the end, or diverge at any point. Notable journeys involved: Giant robots are in Verona Nurse Quest, a video game style segment in which nurse Angelica must deliver a message to Romeo Juliet becomes a pirate Romeo and Juliet elope and raise a family of bodybuilders Romeo becomes a maid Juliet marries Paris Juliet murders Romeo and then Paris and then opens a bakery Personally, I love these kinds of books. I stick my fingers in all the pages when I make choices so I can go back and play again, this time making different decisions. I did read-throughs with friends, making group decisions. I accidentally killed Romeo and Juliet on multiple occasions and had to start over, laughing all the while. The only downside to this kind of book is that you do inevitably end up reading the same sections over and over, trying to figure out how to get to a really cool ending you glimpsed earlier. Other than that, I thoroughly enjoyed this lighthearted book. Read this review & more on my blog: https://atlasrisingbooks.wordpress.co...

  25. 5 out of 5

    Meredith

    It was alright. Some parts were really funny, and other parts dragged on/had too many endings. I felt like there were too many choices and too little "meat" because most of the time you'd only read a sentence or two before having to choose yet another path. Because I was reading this for a book club discussion I was trying to read as many endings as I could in a short amount of time, and I think that took away some of the fun. I'd recommend reading little chunks of this as like a pallet cleanser It was alright. Some parts were really funny, and other parts dragged on/had too many endings. I felt like there were too many choices and too little "meat" because most of the time you'd only read a sentence or two before having to choose yet another path. Because I was reading this for a book club discussion I was trying to read as many endings as I could in a short amount of time, and I think that took away some of the fun. I'd recommend reading little chunks of this as like a pallet cleanser between your other reads and it would probably be more enjoyable.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kirsti

    This was cute. It taught me the terms "uggo" and "drop a vom." I liked that North apparently thought Juliet's character wasn't well-developed enough, so he decided that she is really into lifting weights.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Julia (Shakespeare and Such)

    5/5 stars, so much fun! Full review to come!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Melissa **Just Really Loves Musicals**

    *2.5 stars* This was... ok. It was a mostly fun, quick read that I played through a couple times to get different endings. After a while the story got pretty old. It was also very confusing at one point and I had to go back and restart a section (avoid being the nurse in my opinion.) I can definitely see the appeal, and I love choose-your-Own-Adventure books but this particular one wasn't my favourite.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Okay, so did I technically read every single entry in this Adventure? No. But I did it until it was no longer entertaining, and I think that counts. And my, oh my, it was entertaining for a while. My first round, Juliet doesn't even meet Romeo, she goes off and becomes a pirate who never marries. It only got better from there. Will this book be for everyone? Definitely not. I found his writing hilarious, but I don't think it's universally funny (this is my roundabout way of saying I have an odd Okay, so did I technically read every single entry in this Adventure? No. But I did it until it was no longer entertaining, and I think that counts. And my, oh my, it was entertaining for a while. My first round, Juliet doesn't even meet Romeo, she goes off and becomes a pirate who never marries. It only got better from there. Will this book be for everyone? Definitely not. I found his writing hilarious, but I don't think it's universally funny (this is my roundabout way of saying I have an odd sense of humor). However, it was definitely worth reading as Romeo, Juliet, and Romeo/Juliet. I also had quite the time as Juliet's Nurse. Finally, if you do read it and make it to the passage where Romeo disguises himself as a wall, please note that I laughed so hard I got cramps. 3.5 Stars

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sunil

    To Be or Not To Be: A Chooseable-Path Adventure is a tough act to follow, but somehow Ryan North managed to improve upon an already amazing idea. Once again, I have not even plumbed the entire depths of this book before reviewing it, but I've enjoyed enough of it to give it another enthusiastic stamp of approval. Romeo and/or Juliet gets to be even sillier and more ridiculous than To Be or Not to Be because Romeo and Juliet is a pretty goddamn ridiculous play in comparison. Ryan North relishes To Be or Not To Be: A Chooseable-Path Adventure is a tough act to follow, but somehow Ryan North managed to improve upon an already amazing idea. Once again, I have not even plumbed the entire depths of this book before reviewing it, but I've enjoyed enough of it to give it another enthusiastic stamp of approval. Romeo and/or Juliet gets to be even sillier and more ridiculous than To Be or Not to Be because Romeo and Juliet is a pretty goddamn ridiculous play in comparison. Ryan North relishes in skewering the central romance and the utter teenness of its protagonists (and you can play as either one, switching back and forth during scenes at some points). He unpacks the language and dismantles the metaphors, he attempts to explain strange plot mechanics, he so deftly inserts a character into the finale that I thought I had forgotten him in the original play. This is not as deep and complex a play as Hamlet, so North's commentary is not nearly as revelatory in strengthening your understanding of the play, but it does make you look at it in a new light. Romeo and Juliet had so many possible paths! And...and they consistently chose the wrong ones. But now you can rectify those wrongs! (You can also follow the original path and unlock a new character! That's right, this book has an unlockable character.) The drastic forking of paths is highly entertaining, as something as simple as going to breakfast can end up completely changing the story. But that's not all! As before, there are in fact mini-CYOAs within this CYOA, plus a Nurse Quest text adventure. The things Ryan North manages to do with the CYOA format never cease to amaze me. All of this mayhem contains hundreds of endings, happy and brutal and somewhere in between, with illustrations in many different styles. Endless entertainment! I am here for Ryan North turning the entire Shakespeare canon into chooseable-path adventures.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

In order to read or download eBook, you need to create FREE account.
eBook available in PDF, ePub, MOBI and Kindle versions



Loading...