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Road Rage: Two Novellas (Duel & Road Rage) PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: Road Rage: Two Novellas (Duel & Road Rage)
Author: Richard Matheson
Publisher: Published February 24th 2009 by HarperAudio
ISBN: 9780061726354
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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Road Rage unites Richard Matheson's classic "Duel" and the contemporary work it inspired--two power-packed short stories by three of the genre's most acclaimed authors. "Duel," an unforgettable tale about a driver menaced by a semi truck, was the source for Stephen Spielberg's acclaimed first film of the same name. "Throttle," by Stephen King and Joe Hill, is a duel of a d Road Rage unites Richard Matheson's classic "Duel" and the contemporary work it inspired--two power-packed short stories by three of the genre's most acclaimed authors. "Duel," an unforgettable tale about a driver menaced by a semi truck, was the source for Stephen Spielberg's acclaimed first film of the same name. "Throttle," by Stephen King and Joe Hill, is a duel of a different kind, pitting a faceless trucker against a tribe of motorcycle outlaws, in the simmering Nevada desert. Their battle is fought out on twenty miles of the most lonely road in the country, a place where the only thing worse than not knowing what you're up against, is slowing down . . . 2 Audio CDs / 2 Hours 30 mins ~

30 review for Road Rage: Two Novellas (Duel & Road Rage)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    Kings of suspense joined together with a classic tale and a new tale of anger on the asphalt. These two novellas were a nice little palette cleansing getaway. First, there was Matheson's Duel, which was the inspiration for the classic Spielberg movie. Let's just say, I was listening to this on the highway on the way to work and was very wary of the semis all around me. Then, there was the newer story, Throttle, by King and son (Hill) and it was done very much in the same vein as Duel. In fact, I Kings of suspense joined together with a classic tale and a new tale of anger on the asphalt. These two novellas were a nice little palette cleansing getaway. First, there was Matheson's Duel, which was the inspiration for the classic Spielberg movie. Let's just say, I was listening to this on the highway on the way to work and was very wary of the semis all around me. Then, there was the newer story, Throttle, by King and son (Hill) and it was done very much in the same vein as Duel. In fact, I swear a few of the lines had to be a direct homage to the original story, not to mention the main crux of the whole storyline being almost identical. These guys are the top tellers of this type of suspense and did not let me down. Maybe not the best stories for a road trip, but if you like classic suspense and sheer octane fueled terror, pop the clutch and roll with these two tales.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Noah Nichols

    Stories like these always make me happy. I remember seeing Spielberg's adaptation of Duel back when I was a little boy in the late 80s, and it definitely made a great first impression on me. In this two-piece offering, the iconic Stephen King teams up with his son Joe (Hill) for a short but sweet tribute to the trucker-gone-wild classic. I had never read a Richard Matheson tale before...I had only watched his work on the screen—whether it was adapted into an episode of The Twilight Zone or if it Stories like these always make me happy. I remember seeing Spielberg's adaptation of Duel back when I was a little boy in the late 80s, and it definitely made a great first impression on me. In this two-piece offering, the iconic Stephen King teams up with his son Joe (Hill) for a short but sweet tribute to the trucker-gone-wild classic. I had never read a Richard Matheson tale before...I had only watched his work on the screen—whether it was adapted into an episode of The Twilight Zone or if it were on the "big screen" in the form of the kinda crappy Will Smith vehicle, I Am Legend. And while Duel does still leave a mark as a novella, I can see why the story made so much more impact as a visual medium. Joe and Stephen's story, Throttle, is certainly more exciting and contemporary (obviously). After finishing it up, I read that it'll be turned into a movie down the road. COOL. That'll be fun to watch. Makes me wonder, though...how much money does Stephen King—and perhaps his younger doppelganger by a smaller degree—have rolling in daily? I bet it's a lot. More than I'll ever see in my life. It's probably at the point where the profoundly prolific man despises the color green! Great; now I'm depressed about my own financial situation. If you don't mind, I think I'll just end this review here...so if you need me, I'll be in the corner...cursing at the long-gone bastard who invented money (RIP). Or maybe I will go watch some stuff that was influenced by Duel...like Breakdown (yet another classic—Kurt Russell rules), Joy Ride (um, poor Paul Walker), or The Hitcher (the original, not the remake)! All right. I've typed myself off the ledge; I'll do that instead. Oh yeah, and I'm gonna have to Google the dastardly person who curated currency. That punk ass. Cash kills all of us. Thanks, dead guy! I'm insane. You know that, right?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    I read Richard Matheson's story, Duel, (in the collection of the same title) last year and remember being slightly underwhelmed by the whole collection. Not that the stories weren't good - they were - but more that it's just not what I thought they'd be. I had wanted horror, and I got a lot of sci-fi instead. But I digress. The title story was (very) straight-forward suspense, and though (very) dated, it was a good story and I quite enjoyed it. Let me pause here and add a little side note, which I read Richard Matheson's story, Duel, (in the collection of the same title) last year and remember being slightly underwhelmed by the whole collection. Not that the stories weren't good - they were - but more that it's just not what I thought they'd be. I had wanted horror, and I got a lot of sci-fi instead. But I digress. The title story was (very) straight-forward suspense, and though (very) dated, it was a good story and I quite enjoyed it. Let me pause here and add a little side note, which has actually given me a new appreciation for Duel (the story). I'm currently also ADD-reading Stephen King's Danse Macabre, in which he takes a look at horror as a genre and in general. I'm not very far into DM yet, because I'm kind of having issues being monogamous with my reading at the moment, but I did read an interesting section about some stories being great, lasting, brilliant stories that exist simply for the sake of the reaction one has to reading it, or hearing it, as the case may be. King uses an example of an urban legend story, the one with the kids going up to Lovers' Lane despite the warning that there's a crazed killer on the loose who prowls among unsuspecting snoggers, the girl begs to go home, the guy finally gives in (like he can't get his action elsewhere, the jerk), and finally they leave, only to find evidence that they were mere moments away from being brutally murdered by the psychopath. King mentions in DM that this story exists simply for the fear it causes. There's no history, no characterization, no real "story" at all - just the terror and suspense and dread. Duel was like that. We have two drivers: Aggressor and Victim. We don't know why the A has it out for the V, or what happened to cause A to want to commit vehicular murder, etc. We don't know anything about V except for the barest details that show he's an Innocent Salesman just on his way to a job. Nice guy, pays his taxes, that sort. There's not really any STORY to the story, just a little window of time in which some shit goes down, and we're just there to see it. Suspense just for the sake of being suspenseful. So, like I said, I have a bit of a new appreciation for the story based on this new light, but still, I'm a girl who likes a bit more meat to her stories, namely characterization. I want to be able to identify with the characters and actually fear for them in situations like the one that our victim was in. And I never really did. Not only because of the lack of characterization, but also because I find it incredibly hard to realistically fear the mind-shatteringly fast 60MPH whirlwind that was the Duel chase. Like I said, dated. Throttle, though, was much fresher and more up-to-date and fleshed out in just about every way. Instead of just a series of close calls and bumps, we have real, honest-to-goodness death and destruction ensuing, and real reason to fear. We have characters that have back stories and histories, we have motive, we have SPEED and danger and crises and reason to care. There's a STORY in this story, folks! Wooo! I think it doesn't need to really be said that I preferred Throttle to Duel, but I do think that for what each story is in and of itself, both are very good. Throttle is just more my kind of story. I enjoyed Stephen Lang's reading of these as well. If you are able to listen to the audiobook, it's a good way to kill about 2.5 hours. Otherwise, Throttle can be found in He Is Legend: An Anthology Celebrating Richard Matheson, and Duel, obviously, can be found in Duel: Terror Stories By Richard Matheson. Horror October 2011: #12

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jon(athan) Nakapalau

    I actually listened to this in my car! Talk about paranoia!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lou

    Matheson immerses us in a case of Road rage in Duel a short story. He really places you in the thick of the tension. We all know what it's like driving on the freeway those big trucks they own the road due to their size. He takes this tool of terror a Truck coupled with an anonymous driver who is rampant on causing fear and terror to our likable protagonist. The main protagonist is a salesman on business trip it will be a trip three days of motels and restaurant eating. It all picks up on a Thurs Matheson immerses us in a case of Road rage in Duel a short story. He really places you in the thick of the tension. We all know what it's like driving on the freeway those big trucks they own the road due to their size. He takes this tool of terror a Truck coupled with an anonymous driver who is rampant on causing fear and terror to our likable protagonist. The main protagonist is a salesman on business trip it will be a trip three days of motels and restaurant eating. It all picks up on a Thursday morning on a California Highway. This story is short but it really packs solid prose and psychological thrill. He places you in the shoes of the salesman you see it all through his eyes P.O.V mode and really feel you are there with him in the thick of it, on the highway experiencing the whole series of events to take place. Outstanding Matheson is in his character's and writing. All it takes is one shocking incident and all the years behind you are displaced! Was adapted to screen, directed by Spielberg Throttle by Stephen King and Joe Hill is another story dealing with the road and trucks. Their story is not as first person as Matheson's and you are slightly more away from a psychological thrill. This story is knitted together well. There is to be a graphic novel version of this out in February. Review also here.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    This set of two stories was a nice diversion while driving down I-75 for a couple of hours this afternoon. Then again, it had me looking in my mirror a few times whenever I got close to a trucker... But very enjoyable and Stephen Lang does a good job reading them. The first story was one that I was familiar with, "Duel" by Richard Matheson. I'd seen the movie done by Spielberg so pretty much knew how this went. Still, I was pleased with Matheson's style here, though much of the suspense was lost s This set of two stories was a nice diversion while driving down I-75 for a couple of hours this afternoon. Then again, it had me looking in my mirror a few times whenever I got close to a trucker... But very enjoyable and Stephen Lang does a good job reading them. The first story was one that I was familiar with, "Duel" by Richard Matheson. I'd seen the movie done by Spielberg so pretty much knew how this went. Still, I was pleased with Matheson's style here, though much of the suspense was lost since I knew the story. The second, "Throttle" by Joe Hill and Stephen King, is an update to the story while being an homage to the original. It had the same creepy feeling, with some extra twists which we can always count on with Hill and King. I won't spoil, but fans of all three authors should enjoy this.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tressa

    I was perusing Hoopla's selection of audios because I like to listen to them on my commute or when I'm cooking/cleaning, and I saw that Matheson's short story "Duel" is available as s two-fer with Stephen King and Joe Hill's contemporary version of anonymous man vs. everyman in a duel to the finish on the highway. "Duel" - I first knew about this story back in the seventies when I was a kid and watched the made-for-TV movie starring Dennis Weaver. This was before Steven Spielberg hit it big with I was perusing Hoopla's selection of audios because I like to listen to them on my commute or when I'm cooking/cleaning, and I saw that Matheson's short story "Duel" is available as s two-fer with Stephen King and Joe Hill's contemporary version of anonymous man vs. everyman in a duel to the finish on the highway. "Duel" - I first knew about this story back in the seventies when I was a kid and watched the made-for-TV movie starring Dennis Weaver. This was before Steven Spielberg hit it big with Jaws, and even as a kid I was sucked into the menace of this story about a man traveling for work getting terrorized by an anonymous man in an 18-wheeler. Why? We don't know and we don't care. It's just fun to watch Everyman battling Anonymous Man AKA Beefy Arm Hanging Out the Window. "Throttle" - Stephen King and Joe Hill's short story is about a bunch of bikers being stalked by Anonymous Man. As in "Duel" we don't know why...at first, but in this fleshed-out story we get character background, father/child relationships, and a reason why the bikers are being crushed under the truck driver's wheels. And the denouement of this story makes us feel differently than we felt at the end of "Duel." To say more would be to give it away, but have a listen and enjoy.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    My four star rating is an average of my rating for the two novellas included in this audio collection. Duel by Richard Matheson -- Five Stars One of the good things about the Will Smith version of "I Am Legend" hitting the big-screen is that it brought a lot of harder to find work of Richard Matheson back into print, introducing a new generation of fans to him. "Legend" is one of his strongest offerings, but it seems the man could really do no wrong and he was an absolute master of the short story My four star rating is an average of my rating for the two novellas included in this audio collection. Duel by Richard Matheson -- Five Stars One of the good things about the Will Smith version of "I Am Legend" hitting the big-screen is that it brought a lot of harder to find work of Richard Matheson back into print, introducing a new generation of fans to him. "Legend" is one of his strongest offerings, but it seems the man could really do no wrong and he was an absolute master of the short story and novella. That mastery shows with "Duel." The story is a simple one--a man driving on a California highway one hot summer afternoon enters into a game of chicken when a huge semi. The situation begins innocently enough with our hero, Mann, passing the truck and slowly devolves into a game of wills and utter paranoia as the truck and its driver seem to have it in for Mann. The slow descent into obsession is marvelously played out over the course of the story and watching Mann's increasing desperation to defeat the truck is a fascinating, compelling and scary journey. If you've ever been tailgated by a semi on a two-lane road, you'll understand how easy it is to slip into the madness that grips and eventually consumes Mann. Taut, driven and compelling, the story is an example of Matheson at his finest. It shows his skill of taking ordinary people and putting them into extraordinary situations of high tension in order to observe how they react--both positively and negatively. Mann is self-aware enough, at times, to realize just how crazy his current situation is even though at others he's so consumed by the need to out run the truck or to beat it that he's blinded to the possible implications. It's a great story and wonderfully brought to life in this audio release. "Throttle" by Stephen King and Joe Hill Stephen King has stated (in fact, it's a blurb on the cover of most reissues of Matheson's books) that Matheson is one of the writers who influenced him the most. That's apparent in a large majority of King's writings, though it's not necessarily on as great a display here in "Throttle." Written with his son, Joe Hill, the story is meant as an homage to Matheson and "Duel" and while it has its moments, it pales by comparison. A group of bikers, fleeing a bad investment in a meth lab and murder, encounter a mysterious semi that takes on supernatural like proportions in a road game of cat and mouse. The story has potential and maybe if I'd heard it before I listened to "Duel" I would have liked it more. Instead, the story is a more violent version that has too many irons in the fire to be truly satisfying.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    This audio-only book is actually two stories. "Duel" by Richard Matheson was written I believe sometime in the early 70's and features a salesman trying to get to San Francisco on business who is accosted by an oil rig driver with an unhealthy grudge. The second story, a modern composition called "Throttle", written by Stephen King and Joe Hill was inspired by Matheson's entry. The King/Hill tale revolves around a group of bikers who run across a similar threat and must battle for their lives on This audio-only book is actually two stories. "Duel" by Richard Matheson was written I believe sometime in the early 70's and features a salesman trying to get to San Francisco on business who is accosted by an oil rig driver with an unhealthy grudge. The second story, a modern composition called "Throttle", written by Stephen King and Joe Hill was inspired by Matheson's entry. The King/Hill tale revolves around a group of bikers who run across a similar threat and must battle for their lives on an open and desolate stretch of 20 mile road in Nevada. Both of these stories are ideal for the medium that was chosen to present them. I don't know about you, but the only place I listen to audio books is in my car. Otherwise, I much prefer my reading in that old-fashioned format....a book. But the subject matter and setting thrust you right into the stories because how can we better relate to the plight of the character than when we are sitting in their own seat while listening? While "Duel" sets the stage for "Throttle" in many ways, "Throttle" is the more layered and textured story. "Duel" is relatively short and there is more mystery to the character's backgrounds. "Throttle delves a bit more into back-story, motive, and therefore is a bit longer. While "Duel" may be more effective in its ability to creep you out as our protagonist is alone and isolated, "Throttle" leaves you wondering if there is a protagonist we should be pulling for in the first place. I highly recommend listening to these stories as you travel the open road. Just remember to check your rear and side view mirrors, and keep your own road rage in check. You never know who might be travelling the road with you that day.

  10. 4 out of 5

    John Wiswell

    This was always going to get five stars, even before I picked it up, because although it only has two stories, one is Richard Matheson’s “Duel.” The narrator would have had to mess it horribly, and he certainly didn’t. “Duel” is one of my favorite short stories, being the purest form of a conflict drama, a salesman on the highway pursued by an enigmatic and increasingly violent tanker truck. It’s so strong that the fifth time I read it, sitting on an Amtrak train, after a few pages I unconsciousl This was always going to get five stars, even before I picked it up, because although it only has two stories, one is Richard Matheson’s “Duel.” The narrator would have had to mess it horribly, and he certainly didn’t. “Duel” is one of my favorite short stories, being the purest form of a conflict drama, a salesman on the highway pursued by an enigmatic and increasingly violent tanker truck. It’s so strong that the fifth time I read it, sitting on an Amtrak train, after a few pages I unconsciously checked behind myself to see if a truck was following me. It’s a master class in hooks and delivery, climbing gradually out of the salesman’s mundane thoughts about making his meeting and getting a hot bath, that sleepy lull your thoughts get after hours at the wheel, into horrified speculation about who would try to run him off the road. As the truck becomes more and more insistent, the man realizes there is nowhere he can escape from it, which ought to wear itself out, but Matheson paces it perfectly, alternating between escalating events, morbid suggestions of intent, and our salesman’s internal monologue as he tries to make sense of things and gradually loses his grip. It’s a fable of a giant bear for the automotative world. Stephen Lang doesn’t narrate it like I’ve ever imagined it, but his work is solid. He has a wan voice, reciting his paragraphs, and occasionally leaning in or growing agitated in a way that coaxes emotion out of me. Because if this haggard speaker is worried? Then I also ought to be. He has obvious talent. He gets more material to work with in King and Hill’s “Throttle,” the story of The Tribe, a drug-running biker gang that is waylaid by a mystery attacker in a semi-truck. Set beside “Duel” its homage is obvious, but the comparison makes “Throttle” seem tacky, particularly for its high frequency of graphic violence. The descriptions of bile, vomit, blood, bones sticking out through skin, a shovel jammed into a skull and men run over by cars are exactly the kind of shock value that “Duel” doesn’t need, and reminds me of the old Alfred Hitchcock quote: “There is no terror in the bang, only in the anticipation of it.” “Throttle” is largely bang until the pathos of its climax, which is certainly clever, but still sits on top of a giant highway brawl. That attack, the meat of the story, is a reasonable fight scene, and Lang delivers some of the murders with sinister gravitas, but it’s an odd companion piece to the prolonged tension over the possibility of one man being hurt in “Duel.” To be fair to “Throttle,” I waited a few days and listened to it again without “Duel.” Lang does an excellent job, one of the best narrations of a short story I’ve heard in a long time. It still feels like an excuse for graphic violence, not much depth or pathos to the criminals who are eventually torn up by their truck-villain. A story that is primarily a battle scene is fair beside one that’s essentially a chase scene; this is just far more garish, far more “bang.” And it’s got a brilliant way of revealing who the attacker is. Despite the titling, neither story is a novella; they're both short stories, neither lasting much more than an hour. They're both entertaining and splendidly narrated hours. Come for “Duel,” sit deep for “Throttle,” and see which you prefer. Happy driving.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Obrigewitsch

    This contains two utterly ridiculous novellas, about crazed Semi-Truck drivers that can miraculously outmaneuver, out accelerate and out drive people on motorcycles and in cars, while pulling full trailers behind them. The only thing that saves this from being a complete train wreck was Stephan Kings ability to write good characters.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Toni FGMAMTC

    Duel - 3.75 stars Throttle - 2.75 stars The suspense, angst and thriller aspects of these two novellas are beyond intense. I was definitely sitting on the edge of my seat. Especially with Duel, I almost had anxiety overload.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    A couple of road rage short stories that go pretty much as one might expect. Only in this day and age, they are more frequent. 5 of 10 stars

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    This was an entertaining one/two punch. "Duel" by Richard Matheson is a classic. Matheson wrote a lot of "Twilight Zone" episodes and was always great at literary twists and turns. "Duel" is short and simple: A business man (literally his name is Mann) is driving across a lonesome stretch of road when we begins being terrorized by a truck driver. We never see the driver's face and we don't know the motivations and that makes it all the more scary. The ending is visceral and impactful. "Road Rage" This was an entertaining one/two punch. "Duel" by Richard Matheson is a classic. Matheson wrote a lot of "Twilight Zone" episodes and was always great at literary twists and turns. "Duel" is short and simple: A business man (literally his name is Mann) is driving across a lonesome stretch of road when we begins being terrorized by a truck driver. We never see the driver's face and we don't know the motivations and that makes it all the more scary. The ending is visceral and impactful. "Road Rage" is an homage to "Duel" by the father/son duo: Stephen King and Joe Hill. It's the same basic premise but with a twist: This time a truck driver is terrorizing a motorcycle gang on a lonesome stretch of road. The drivers ultimate motivation is a fantastic twist and has emotional resonance. Considering King and Hill are two of my favorite authors working today, it's no big surprise that I loved this one.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kandice

    I can see why these two stories were packaged together even though they were written decades apart. They are both about semi-trucks on seemingly unexplainable rampages. The reader, Stephen Lang, also read Heart-Shaped Box by Hill and was perfect for these stories. His voice is a bit rough, he sounds incredibly "manly" and his words flow flawlessly. He reads with feeling, but not so much that you are forced to see things his way. In case you are wondering, he plays Colonel Quaritch in Avatar. The I can see why these two stories were packaged together even though they were written decades apart. They are both about semi-trucks on seemingly unexplainable rampages. The reader, Stephen Lang, also read Heart-Shaped Box by Hill and was perfect for these stories. His voice is a bit rough, he sounds incredibly "manly" and his words flow flawlessly. He reads with feeling, but not so much that you are forced to see things his way. In case you are wondering, he plays Colonel Quaritch in Avatar. The guy with the wicked scar along his pate? See, pretty manly! The first, Duel, takes place in the late 60's and is about a travelling salesman who encounters a mad trucker on an out of the way road. There's no obvious reason, but the trucker is out to get Mann, the salesman. I'm sure when the book was written, the 60 mph, "fast speed" chases would have been pretty exciting to read, but now, 60 mph just seems...well, slow. I have enjoyed everything of Matheson's I've read, and I did enjoy this one, I just don't feel the years were kind to it's premise. Even as I listened, I expected the second story to be an updated version of Duel. It almost cried out for it. Duel leaves us with no answers, something I'm okay with, but I couldn't help but look forward to what Hill and King would do with their story. The second installment, Throttle, is indeed a bit of an updated version. This time, instead of a single car driving salesman, those pursued by the mad trucker are a motorcycle gang on the run from a situation gone waaaaaay bad. About as bad, and bloody, as a situation can get. They stop at a truck stop and then are pursued by a semi-truck when they leave. Where Mann, in Duel, seemed an innocent, these bikers are not. We don't know (to begin with) why this is happening, but we can see someone, somewhere, may think they deserve it. As I listened, it seemed to me that Hill did most of the writing for Throttle, while his dad gave him all the details that made these bikers seem authentic and real. Only someone who actually rides could have gotten all the miscelania correct. In Throttle, we are treated to a conclusion and resolution of sorts, but by the time we get it, the relationship between two of the characters has become what I was most interested in. I almost didn't care why, I wanted more of the emotional consequences.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Road Rage contains two novellas: Duel by Richard Matheson, and Throttle by Joe Hill and Stephen King. I listened to this on audio, and it seemed like the perfect subject to be listening to while driving in the car. In "Duel," billed as a classic that inspired "Throttle," the main character, Man, is driving to a sales meeting when he passes a truck. Then the truck passes him. As this battle goes on, Man wavers from thinking he's reading too much into things to becoming convinced that the trucker i Road Rage contains two novellas: Duel by Richard Matheson, and Throttle by Joe Hill and Stephen King. I listened to this on audio, and it seemed like the perfect subject to be listening to while driving in the car. In "Duel," billed as a classic that inspired "Throttle," the main character, Man, is driving to a sales meeting when he passes a truck. Then the truck passes him. As this battle goes on, Man wavers from thinking he's reading too much into things to becoming convinced that the trucker is a psycho set on his destruction. With the side of the truck reading "Keller" which Man misreads as "Killer," he finds himself driving for his life... The narrator for this novel sounded so much like Vincent Price that I found myself giggling when he snarled such lines as, "You son of a bitch." I did not have the same issue with the narrator for the King/Hill story, so it was clearly Matheson's writing style that did it for me. Matheson is also the author of "I Am Legend" which was made into the movie "The Last Man on Earth" starring Vincent Price... In "Throttle," a tribe of bikers on the run from a murder that occurred during some kind of meth deal gone bad arrive at a truck stop and argue about it near a truck that says "Laughlin" on it. The leader, Vince, misreads it as "Slaughterin." The truck pulls away, and later the bikers "catch up" to the truck... only a short time later realizing that the trucker has been waiting for them so he can run them over from behind one by one... I'm a huge fan of both Stephen King and Joe Hill, but I had a hard time really getting into this story. I never quite got a handle on what kind of deal was happening to cause the murder. I did enjoy the parallels to Vietnam and the complicated relationship between Vince and his son Race. The narrator sounded more natural reading this story although some of the voices he uses for various bikers got really low-pitched and difficult to understand. Overall this was a short book (2 discs) that was fun to listen to while driving... you'll never look at truckers the same way!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Linda Munro

    I actually picked this up in audiobook format to listen to on my trips back and forth to the doctor and physical therapist. If I would have read this, it probably would have received a lesser rating; however, when listening to this audiobook, with two novellas concerning maniac semi drivers killing people on the highway for sport while driving on the thruway surrounded by semis was a bit freaky to say the least. My recommendation...if you want to experience this book, get an audio copy, head to I actually picked this up in audiobook format to listen to on my trips back and forth to the doctor and physical therapist. If I would have read this, it probably would have received a lesser rating; however, when listening to this audiobook, with two novellas concerning maniac semi drivers killing people on the highway for sport while driving on the thruway surrounded by semis was a bit freaky to say the least. My recommendation...if you want to experience this book, get an audio copy, head to the nearest semi congested thruway and get more than you bargain for!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Jorgensen

    Both Richard Matheson and Stephen and Joe's novellas are compelling, bite-sized morsels of suspense and high-speed action. As usual, King doesn't disappoint me. His ability to tell a story is unmatched, and teaming up with Joe, a gifted storyteller in his own right, really was beautiful. Both stories are amazing, and it is awesome to see Matheson, a huge influence on King, get paid a tribute. I listened to this book via AUDIO, and it was even more satisfying hearing the story aloud than if I had Both Richard Matheson and Stephen and Joe's novellas are compelling, bite-sized morsels of suspense and high-speed action. As usual, King doesn't disappoint me. His ability to tell a story is unmatched, and teaming up with Joe, a gifted storyteller in his own right, really was beautiful. Both stories are amazing, and it is awesome to see Matheson, a huge influence on King, get paid a tribute. I listened to this book via AUDIO, and it was even more satisfying hearing the story aloud than if I had read them on my own. Short stories and novellas are usually excellent audio books.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Summer

    "Duel" was an excellent short story and worth reading on its own. Great tension and paranoia. "Throttle" didn't really do it for me though. There were more developed characters but I didn't get the same excitement or interest that I did from "Duel" probably because I felt they had it coming. 4 stars is definitely for "Duel" though.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Amity

    Great short stories.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Connie

    There were 2 stories in this audio. The first book of Road Rage was about this business man was driving on a two lane highway trying to get to San Francisco for a business trip when for some unknown reason, this trucker starts stalking him on the highway. The trucker did everything imaginable besides actually ramming into the business man's car to make him crash. It was insane! I was holding my breath in some parts and calling the business man stupid in other parts because nothing, especially th There were 2 stories in this audio. The first book of Road Rage was about this business man was driving on a two lane highway trying to get to San Francisco for a business trip when for some unknown reason, this trucker starts stalking him on the highway. The trucker did everything imaginable besides actually ramming into the business man's car to make him crash. It was insane! I was holding my breath in some parts and calling the business man stupid in other parts because nothing, especially the male ego is worth your life. I was thinking I would have lost the business deal and went back home to my family. This man had a wife and kids to think about. This was a 4 star story. The second part to road rage was about a gang of bikers who was trying to break into he drug trade had their business go sour even before it got started. They tried to go after one of the guys that was supposed to manage the drug house and ended up killing him and his girlfriend. They stop at a diner and started talking about what happened with the killings. There was a trucker who overheard the conversation, but went on his way after a few minutes. When the bikers got back onto the highway, that trucker who was at the pit stop ended up picking the bikers off one by one. He just smooth ran them over. It was pretty gross. I think they started with 6 or 8 men and ended with 3 before the men were able to immobilize the trucker. This was a 3 star story. The first story was a 4 star because there wasn't any rhyme or reason why that trucker singled that business man out. With the second story, you can kind of understand because those weren't nice guys. They killed and were a bunch of outlaws so it almost seemed justifiable? Maybe? Vigilante justice? I can kind of go with it, so it didn't seem so dramatic even though it was gruesome. I forgot how much I enjoyed Stephen King's works. Will try to remember to incorporate some more if his works in my reading material.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lex

    I enjoyed Richard Matheson's short story, Duel, because of 2 reasons. I could greatly relate with David Mann. I get the usual road rage and accompanying paranoia, when I drive alone. I felt the anger, the fear, and all the dastardly and horrific (even vengeful and murderous) thoughts that his mind kept playing during the chase scenes. But then again, even those thoughts and feelings when he wasn't behind the wheel...that's the second reason. I could relate. Richard Matheson easily, and vividly w I enjoyed Richard Matheson's short story, Duel, because of 2 reasons. I could greatly relate with David Mann. I get the usual road rage and accompanying paranoia, when I drive alone. I felt the anger, the fear, and all the dastardly and horrific (even vengeful and murderous) thoughts that his mind kept playing during the chase scenes. But then again, even those thoughts and feelings when he wasn't behind the wheel...that's the second reason. I could relate. Richard Matheson easily, and vividly wrote about it because he went through the experience against a trucker. Anyway, enough freaky parallelisms...this classic novel inspired a telecast (and then a movie) that a young Steven Spielberg directed way back in the 70's. I read that it got so popular back then, and it's quite understandable, as anybody behind a wheel who drives long distances in open highways can attest to. Throttle, the second story in this compilation, is something else entirely. Sure, it's about some bikers who get chased-down by a lunatic truck driver, much like Duel's David Mann, but that's all the inspiration that seals the connection between the two. This is a good story of father and son - both set on a downward spiral as they get tangled up in a heinous crime, only to be shocked as their biker tribe gets picked-off one-by-one by rampaging truck while they're on the road. There are very graphic, horrific scenes here, but I deem the twist at the end to be the major draw here, especially if this were translated into a movie. I'm not much of a Joe Hill follower, but I could easily recognize Stephen King's inputs into this story. And although most writing collaborations are often criticized as compromising each writer's styles, I believe this one was well done. I recommend this to anyone who wants a short read that's lined with just the right amount of suspense, real characters, and small but solid twists.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Elyse

    Two novellas. Duel by Richard Matheson and Throttle by Stephen King and Joe Hill. Nothing special. Short and entertaining. Chock full of unappealing men!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    "Duel" by Richard Matheson God bless Richard Matheson, who gave us "I Am Legend" and all the good episodes of "The Twilight Zone." "Duel" chronicles one man's frantic attempt to out-drive and outwit a maniac in a giant tanker truck. What makes "Duel" truly, terribly effective as a horror story is that it's so random; in real life, one's actions aren't always neatly mapped out and carefully explained. Sometimes, there is no motive or explanation for a senseless act; writers of books, television, a "Duel" by Richard Matheson God bless Richard Matheson, who gave us "I Am Legend" and all the good episodes of "The Twilight Zone." "Duel" chronicles one man's frantic attempt to out-drive and outwit a maniac in a giant tanker truck. What makes "Duel" truly, terribly effective as a horror story is that it's so random; in real life, one's actions aren't always neatly mapped out and carefully explained. Sometimes, there is no motive or explanation for a senseless act; writers of books, television, and movies tend to forget this. On TV, the villain always has an elaborate motive to even the most senseless and depraved acts. Matheson crafts an effectively creepy story because the villain's motives are never concretely explained, only guessed vaguely at. The true terror isn't from the trucker who seems to be trying to run a complete and total stranger off the road. It's from the fact that his victim can't figure out why. "Throttle" by Stephen King and Joe Hill As with "In the Tall Grass," King and Hill blend seamlessly together to create something frightening. While "Throttle" is nowhere near as disturbing as "In the Tall Grass," it is still gory and visceral. A gang of bikers on the run after a drug deal gone horribly wrong find themselves desperately fleeing a mad stranger behind the wheel of a semi. Though the trucker winds up having a concrete motive for running the bikers down like dogs, it's complex enough that the reader can't decide who's right or wrong in the situation. The bikers have done something terrible, but they're still somewhat likable; they have realistic personality quirks, and they are not complete monsters. When combined, "Duel" and "Throttle" create the perfect picture of how harsh and unforgiving a vehicle can be.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Adam Wilson

    Road Rage is an all-to short novella "collection" by Stephen King, his son Joe Hill, and Richard Matheson. To me, and to you if you are a horror fan, this should sound like a gift from...well whoever delivers wonderous things upon us. I guess that would be the authors of this great audio experience. I must say though that putting Duel by Matheson (one of the best short stories I've ever read) next to Hill and King's Throttle is a bit like putting a well-dressed and highly professional mathematic Road Rage is an all-to short novella "collection" by Stephen King, his son Joe Hill, and Richard Matheson. To me, and to you if you are a horror fan, this should sound like a gift from...well whoever delivers wonderous things upon us. I guess that would be the authors of this great audio experience. I must say though that putting Duel by Matheson (one of the best short stories I've ever read) next to Hill and King's Throttle is a bit like putting a well-dressed and highly professional mathematician next to a sweaty gym teacher holding a dodge-ball. Okay, maybe that's a bit harsh but Duel is a tight little tale which grabs you and doesn't let go until the very last word. Throttle, unlike it's name, is rather slow in the beginning and feels awkward in the ending. Nevertheless, the two go good together and balance each outher out, much like the annoyingly intelligent mathematician and smelly gym teacher would balance each other out. They are both fun and totally different even though they concern similar situations. I would give Throttle 3 stars and Duel 5 easily, so the collection over-all gets a solid 4.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Selu

    Duel: I've not read much Matheson, but I do seem to like what I have read by him so I'll probably read more. I enjoyed this much more than I thought I would, especially when coupled with "Throttle," which was the larger draw for me. However, this was more psychological than I expected (always a good thing), and I wondered through much of the story if Mann was just crazy and this poor trucker had the bad luck of driving the road with him. Nice use of tension and pacing—I actually sped up the audi Duel: I've not read much Matheson, but I do seem to like what I have read by him so I'll probably read more. I enjoyed this much more than I thought I would, especially when coupled with "Throttle," which was the larger draw for me. However, this was more psychological than I expected (always a good thing), and I wondered through much of the story if Mann was just crazy and this poor trucker had the bad luck of driving the road with him. Nice use of tension and pacing—I actually sped up the audiobook so I could get to the end faster. Throttle: I expected to like this so much more than I did. King is my favorite and Hill is always solid so if they write something together, it'll be magic, right? Not so much. Basically, this was Sons of Anarachy with a slight conscience, and like SOA I was rooting for the poor bastard that was not going to see the end of the episode. On its own, the story is not awful, but coupled with "Duel," it definitely is the lesser of the two. The sum-up: Car versus truck is where the real action rides.

  27. 4 out of 5

    David

    Audiobook collection of two novellas, one classic and one current about killers behind large trucks. Both are superbly narrated by Stephen Lang. The first novella is the classic "Duel" by Richard Matheson. The classic Spielberg film is based on this equally good short story. Actually, the main character (called Mann) is a less annoying and more sympathetic character than the film. This is a sheer brilliant hour of narrated terror. Following this is a collaboration between Stephen King and his son Audiobook collection of two novellas, one classic and one current about killers behind large trucks. Both are superbly narrated by Stephen Lang. The first novella is the classic "Duel" by Richard Matheson. The classic Spielberg film is based on this equally good short story. Actually, the main character (called Mann) is a less annoying and more sympathetic character than the film. This is a sheer brilliant hour of narrated terror. Following this is a collaboration between Stephen King and his son Joe Hill called "Throttle". This one is not in the same league as "Duel", but is eventually quite good. It is very slow starting, with a whole lot of background on a motorcycle gang involved in meth operations. They insult a trucker at a truck stop who bides his time to hunt down the motorcycle tribe one by one on the open road. This is where the story gets good. It treads the ground paved by Matheson, but ultimately just isn't quite the same. Still, it's entertaining and a nice companion piece.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Peter Wright

    I was excited about this audio book because I've always loved Spielberg's Duel and had wanted to read the short story upon which it was based. I'm also a Stephen King fan, so this was really a no-brainer. Duel is a chilling story about a sadistic trucker and a fellow basically just known as "man." As the story builds, so does the tension until the destructive conclusion. Throttle is the collaboration between Stephen King and his son Joe Hill. They take the concept from Duel and add a back story an I was excited about this audio book because I've always loved Spielberg's Duel and had wanted to read the short story upon which it was based. I'm also a Stephen King fan, so this was really a no-brainer. Duel is a chilling story about a sadistic trucker and a fellow basically just known as "man." As the story builds, so does the tension until the destructive conclusion. Throttle is the collaboration between Stephen King and his son Joe Hill. They take the concept from Duel and add a back story and, naturally, more gore. King always excels at characters and Throttle is no exception. The back story fleshes out the protagonists in a way that was missing from Duel. King and Hill add to the concept of Duel in a way that is fun, if not original. They pay little tributes to the original in a way that also serves their story - it's not just there to be there. I experienced this as an audio book and highly recommend that as an alternate way to enjoy these stories.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Erika

    I would have liked this better if it wasn't an audiobook. I did not love the narrator.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I listened to these two novellas before I read the graphic novel version. I did not expect to have any interest in either of these stories, but I actually REALLY enjoyed Duel by Richard Matheson. It was simple and realistic which is what makes it so terrifying. It has definitely gotten me to think differently about driving. Haha In a way, it was kind of similar to Psycho. It was very simple, but packed a real punch. Throttle by Stephen King and Joe Hill was good, but I didn't particularly care abo I listened to these two novellas before I read the graphic novel version. I did not expect to have any interest in either of these stories, but I actually REALLY enjoyed Duel by Richard Matheson. It was simple and realistic which is what makes it so terrifying. It has definitely gotten me to think differently about driving. Haha In a way, it was kind of similar to Psycho. It was very simple, but packed a real punch. Throttle by Stephen King and Joe Hill was good, but I didn't particularly care about it. Idk if that's because of how much I loved the simplicity of Duel, but it just didn't stand out to me, nor did I care about a single one of the characters. (view spoiler)[ I think that Throttle explained too much for me. I loved the simplicity of Duel in that there was no real background or reason to the story. Throttle just became a revenge story about meth dealing motorcyclists. I suppose it was more gruesome, but less scary when given such a clear reason. (hide spoiler)]

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