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The Rage of Dragons PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: The Rage of Dragons
Author: Evan Winter
Publisher: Published September 10th 2017 by Beautiful Beast
ISBN: null
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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#1 BEST SELLER in its category TOP 50 in Dark Fantasy TOP 100 in Epic Fantasy TOP 100 in Swords and Sorcery GAME OF THRONES MEETS GLADIATOR... The Omehi are surrounded by enemies that want them dead. They will not be easy prey. One in twenty-five hundred Omehi women are Gifted, wielding fragments of their Goddess’ power and capable of controlling the world’s most destructi #1 BEST SELLER in its category TOP 50 in Dark Fantasy TOP 100 in Epic Fantasy TOP 100 in Swords and Sorcery GAME OF THRONES MEETS GLADIATOR... The Omehi are surrounded by enemies that want them dead. They will not be easy prey. One in twenty-five hundred Omehi women are Gifted, wielding fragments of their Goddess’ power and capable of controlling the world’s most destructive weapon - Dragons. One in a hundred of their men has blood strong enough for the Gifted to infuse with magic, turning these warriors into near unstoppable colossi. The rest are bred to fight, ferocious soldiers fated to die in the endless war. Tau Tafari, an Omehi commoner, wants more than this, but his life is destroyed when he’s betrayed by those he was born to serve. Now, with too few Gifted left and the Omehi facing genocide, Tau cares only for revenge. Following an unthinkable path, he will become the greatest swordsman to ever live, dying a hundred thousand times for the chance to kill three of his own people.

30 review for The Rage of Dragons

  1. 5 out of 5

    Evan Winter

    I think it's great, but then I wrote it, and my mother always said I should be proud of myself and the things I accomplish. I'm very proud of this. Maybe too proud. You be the judge. Though, you're most likely to have a good time if you enjoy Robert Jordan's expansive worlds, Brandon Sanderson's detailed magic systems, Joe Abercrombie's gritty combat, and Pierce Brown's page-burning pace of action. My goal was to write something that I would, as a reader, love. The joke is that, since I'm the on I think it's great, but then I wrote it, and my mother always said I should be proud of myself and the things I accomplish. I'm very proud of this. Maybe too proud. You be the judge. Though, you're most likely to have a good time if you enjoy Robert Jordan's expansive worlds, Brandon Sanderson's detailed magic systems, Joe Abercrombie's gritty combat, and Pierce Brown's page-burning pace of action. My goal was to write something that I would, as a reader, love. The joke is that, since I'm the one who wrote the book, I've lost the distance needed to know if I'd actually like it. But, I am proud of it. I think it's good. More important, what do you think? Evan Winter

  2. 4 out of 5

    kartik narayanan

    I am not sure who recommended The Rage of Dragons to me. Whoever it was, THANK YOU! The first 20% of the book is a snore fest. At times, I was tempted to chuck the book away. But then, the Zaknafein moment happened, and the book went full Hulk on me. BOOK SMASH PUNY READER! The remaining 80% is as action packed as it is possible for the written word to be. There is plenty of humour, drama, character development, world building and every other thing you can think of. The only problem with finishing I am not sure who recommended The Rage of Dragons to me. Whoever it was, THANK YOU! The first 20% of the book is a snore fest. At times, I was tempted to chuck the book away. But then, the Zaknafein moment happened, and the book went full Hulk on me. BOOK SMASH PUNY READER! The remaining 80% is as action packed as it is possible for the written word to be. There is plenty of humour, drama, character development, world building and every other thing you can think of. The only problem with finishing this book is that the book is fucking finished and the sequel is not out yet. In conclusion, if you have to read a limited set of fantasy books this year, The Rage of Dragons should be in your top three (because, you know, Hulk!)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Roberto Velastegui

    Highly recommend this novel to anyone who enjoys a good fantasy story centered around the action, with slices of romance and drama. Deeply entertaining, with a slow but complex buildup in characters development, and a fast pace in story telling. The world that Evan sets for the readers is as vast and mysterious as can be imagined. With a lot more to explore and learn (from future book to come), Evan first novel is a must read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Grady

    ‘A Dragon had been called and someone would have to die.’ British born Evan Winter was raised by his South American parents in Africa near the historical territory of his Xhosa ancestors. Evan’s life history to date is fodder for many novels – he has a University degree, has tended bars in two countries, became a director and cinematographer, was threatened by UK mobsters in a case of mistaken identity, worked with wonderful A-list celebrities, and became the Creative Director for one of the worl ‘A Dragon had been called and someone would have to die.’ British born Evan Winter was raised by his South American parents in Africa near the historical territory of his Xhosa ancestors. Evan’s life history to date is fodder for many novels – he has a University degree, has tended bars in two countries, became a director and cinematographer, was threatened by UK mobsters in a case of mistaken identity, worked with wonderful A-list celebrities, and became the Creative Director for one of the world's largest infrastructure companies before turning to writing fantasy novels. THE RAGE OF DRAGONS is his formal literary debut and after reading it seems to be the introduction of a series. He has the courage and chutzpah of youth and the daring imagination of an ancient story weaver at this disposal. Evan takes on a genre that while popular among a vast number of readers (and television and film watchers and game players) – the world of fantasy – and steps into that role of creating bizarre names of his characters, places, incidents weaponry, and concepts that require mental adjustment. That is a given and those who love dragons and fantasy and mass wars etc are used to it: the period of adjustment usually is completed by the end of the first chapter. Evan has the courage and good judgment to open his story with relatable, accessible setting and characters and that offers a feeling not only of curiosity for what I to come, but makes the reader comfortable with a new writer’s style. To wit: ‘Landfall - Queen Taifa stood at the bow of Targon, her beached warship, and looked out at the massacre on the sands. Her other ships were empty. The fighting men and women of the Chosen were already on shore, were already killing and dying. Their screams, not so different from those they fought, washed over her in waves. She looked to the sun. It burned high overhead and the killing would not stop until well past nightfall, which meant too many more would die. She heard footsteps on the deck behind her and tried to take comfort in the sounds of Tsiory's powerful gait. "My Queen," he said. Taifa nodded, permitting him to speak, but did not turn away from the slaughter on the shore. If this was to be the end of her people, she would bear witness. She could do that much. "We cannot hold the beach," he told her. "We have to retreat to the ships. We have to relaunch them." "No, I won't go back on the water. The rest of the fleet will be here soon." "Families, children, the old and infirm. Not fighters. Not Gifted." Taifa hadn't turned. She couldn't face him, not yet. "It's beautiful here," she told him. "Hotter than Osonte, but beautiful. Look." She pointed to the mountains in the distance. "We landed on a peninsula, bordered and bisected by mountains. It's defensible and arable. We could make a home here. Couldn't we? A home for my people." She faced him. His presence comforted her. Champion Tsiory, so strong and loyal. He made her feel safe, loved. She wished she could do the same for him.’ Evan provides a well- distilled synopsis that is seductive – ‘The Omehi are surrounded by enemies that want them dead. They will not be easy prey. One in twenty-five hundred Omehi women are Gifted, wielding fragments of their Goddess’ power and capable of controlling the world’s most destructive weapon - Dragons. One in a hundred of their men has blood strong enough for the Gifted to infuse with magic, turning these warriors into near unstoppable colossi. The rest are bred to fight, ferocious soldiers fated to die in the endless war. Tau Tafari, an Omehi commoner, wants more than this but his life is destroyed when he’s betrayed by those he was born to serve. Now, with too few Gifted left and the Omehi facing genocide, Tau cares only for revenge. Following an unthinkable path, he will become the greatest swordsman to ever live, dying a hundred thousand times for the chance to kill three of his own people.’ Yes, as with many first novels there is evidence of the need for a keen editorial eye for the structure, grammar and other minor flaws, but this book carries a solid Fantasy Story that suggests Evan Winter does indeed have a solid career at his fingertips. He is a new writer to watch.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    I picked up a copy of this book after reading very positive reviews both on here and elsewhere online. ‘Maybe this is the next big thing!’ I told myself excitedly, as I pictured myself being the ultimate hipster being able to claim I’d read it long before it became cool. This is your archetypal fantasy story of a farmboy out to avenge the murder of his parent(s) against a backdrop of war and class oppression. If you’re looking for a wildly original story, this is not for you. If you’re looking f I picked up a copy of this book after reading very positive reviews both on here and elsewhere online. ‘Maybe this is the next big thing!’ I told myself excitedly, as I pictured myself being the ultimate hipster being able to claim I’d read it long before it became cool. This is your archetypal fantasy story of a farmboy out to avenge the murder of his parent(s) against a backdrop of war and class oppression. If you’re looking for a wildly original story, this is not for you. If you’re looking for sword-swinging action, it most definitely is. The blurb promised a cross between Game of Thrones and Gladiator. I don’t usually take these marketing slogans seriously, and well you should not, as there is none of George Martin’s political intrigue and subtext to be found, and the promised dragons barely feature; although the Gladiator comparison is a fair one as it’s essentially the same story minus the compelling villain of Ridley Scott’s Oscar-winning film. The setting for Winter’s fantasy was an intriguing one. A fantasy novel with an African inspiration is a refreshing prospect in a genre saturated with medieval Europe rip-offs. However, I was mostly disappointed to find that this didn’t really break the trend – dragons, for one, are a feature of European/Asian mythology, and all the descriptions of crenellations and stone torch-lit tunnels just made me think of European castles. Though perhaps this is my imagination’s fault, I just didn’t see much in terms of a unique and memorable fantasy setting. This leads to one of the major problems I had with this book: everything felt skin-deep and superficial. The underlining theme of the book is struggle against an oppressive class structure, and, throughout, this is relayed to the reader via a wide array of nouns for the various classes and military/social roles. After finishing the 400-page novel, I still could not say what half of these words mean and what their role in the world is. What is a KaEid? What is the difference between an Inkokeliki and an Umbonqisi? I couldn’t tell you. I understand many of these words are pulled from real-world African examples. Which is fine, as is the general method of showing, not telling, but when they are thrown at the reader constantly you need a solid understanding of what these words mean if you’re to get to grips with what is happening and the world it is happening in. There are many, many lengthy action sequences in this book where I struggled to decipher what was happening because of this. There did not seem to be any complexity to the society beyond these words, and if there was, it was certainly not explored adequately. Maybe too much is expected of the reader here, and a glossary would have been extremely useful. My other major irk with this book was all the fights. There are simply too many. Of the 400+ pages of the book, I would guess at about 200 of these being solely devoted to descriptions of sword fights. This might be fine for some, and they are reasonably well-written, but for me they became a chore to get through by the second half of the book. Perhaps this was because the main character, Tau, became a Mary Sue of indescribable proportions by this point (seriously, I thought Red Rising’s Darrow was bad enough), which took any tension out of the action for the reader, but ultimately there is little variety for the reader to enjoy. Any development in the story is resolved with more sword fights, so if you've read one chapter you've basically read the entire book. The other problem with this devotion to endless descriptions of hacking and slashing is that it takes up too much space. Towards the end of the book, there’s a ‘twist’ where the main villain decides to betray the Queen. OK cool, this should be quite an interesting development. But no, both the villain and the Queen in question have both only had about three lines of dialogue apiece, and the reader subsequently has no vested interest in this betrayal. They simply are not given the time or the space in the novel for you to care, which results in the final set-piece of the story being something of a damp squib. There are not enough pages devoted to world-building. The reader is not given enough perspective of many of the settings or the world’s vernacular. That’s not to say I hated everything about the book. Some of it I found interesting. The magic system was intriguing and complex, if confusing in places, and I enjoyed how it tied together with the world’s class system, similar to Brandon Sanderson’s Mistborn series. The writing is passable, although I did roll my eyes at some of the ‘badass’ dialogue and a professional author really should know the difference between hanged and hung. Overall, I was glad to finish the book, which was disappointing as I was encouraged after reading the reviews it is getting. Maybe it just isn’t for me.

  6. 4 out of 5

    H. P.

    Really? Another pitch comparing a book to Game of Thrones? What’s that—there’s more? “GAME OF THRONES MEETS GLADIATOR… ON ARRAKIS” Oh. Now you have my attention. And that cover! Does The Rage of Dragons live up to it? As an epic fantasy, it does. Unfortunately, The Rage of Dragons is really two stories spliced together. Winters injects a plodding and frustrating revenge/YA dystopian/military fantasy into the much more interesting epic fantasy. Winter has created a richly detailed world and he hits u Really? Another pitch comparing a book to Game of Thrones? What’s that—there’s more? “GAME OF THRONES MEETS GLADIATOR… ON ARRAKIS” Oh. Now you have my attention. And that cover! Does The Rage of Dragons live up to it? As an epic fantasy, it does. Unfortunately, The Rage of Dragons is really two stories spliced together. Winters injects a plodding and frustrating revenge/YA dystopian/military fantasy into the much more interesting epic fantasy. Winter has created a richly detailed world and he hits us with a ton of detail in the prologue detailing the Omehi landing on the peninsula where the main story takes place 200 years later. They are fleeing something called the Cull. They bring with them Guardians—dragons. Using that and other magical Gifts—Enraging, which makes Omehi men near unstoppable Colossi, and Enervating, which leaves opponents unable to fight—they push the native Xiddeen of the peninsula. 200 years later the war with the Xiddeen hasn’t stopped. There is a lot going on there. But the prologue also has a massive set piece battle involving dragons. Dragons burninating their enemies doesn’t get old, people. It’s the spoonful of sugar to help the worldbuilding medicine go down. I was mildly critical of the fantasy trope of renaming normal things in my review of Age of Assassins. There is some of that here, but it works better because Winter’s world has got that iceberg feel—the sense that there is much more under the surface than Winter is showing us. This is probably in part of Winter borrowing more from what strikes me as probably African and Mediterranean history than from the more usual European history. The peninsula is hot and arid. The Omehi fight with bronze swords and the Xiddeen often with stone spears. The later info dumps that explain a lot of what we see in the prologue are a little clunky, but the real problem isn’t with the epic fantasy side of things. The story really bogs down when it drills down in focus on Tau. Events early in the books put Tau on the path of revenge. A well worn but still welcome trope. The initial tragedy certainly leaves us with ample sympathy for Tau. Tau, unfortunately, squanders that sympathy. He isn’t single-minded about revenge so much as half-minded. If he sees one of the men he seeks to take revenge on, he will draw his sword and head over to attack, even if that man is surrounded by twenty crack soldiers and failure would mean death for his entire family (and probably his unit too). Winter could have saved us all some trouble and just named Tau Leeroy Jenkins. Comically, in one scene his internal monologue indicates he will sneak up on his target, only for him to immediately start shouting from ten paces away. He refuses to give even the slightest thought to any consideration of tactics or strategy, even when they would help him get revenge. This sort of thing can be part of an effective arc, and Tau does eventually change, but by then any sympathy I had for him his long gone. What about all of the people around him he has endangered who are actually decent human beings? All of this takes place while Tau is training to be a part of one of his caste’s military units. So, in addition to the revenge story, there are elements of military fantasy as well. And the caste system is used to show injustice in much the vein of a lot of dystopian YA books. But Tau resists any camaraderie with his fellow trainees (even though they could help him take revenge), and the military side of it isn’t super interesting (it has shades of a sports book or something like Holly Jenning’s Arena too). The inter-caste conflict is more interesting, although Tau is frequently so stupid that he would get screwed by even a fair system, so what does it matter? Thankfully Winter eventually remembers he is writing an epic fantasy. The endgame is much better than the middle of the book, with enormous set pieces and shocking reveals. The Rage of Dragons was a book with enormous potential. A few tweaks to the protagonist and a defter hand at the craft and this would have been a great book. 4.5 of 5 Stars as an epic fantasy. 2.5. of 5 Stars as a YA/military fantasy/revenge story. 3.5 of 5 Stars overall. Winter sent me a review copy of The Rage of Dragons.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nadia Khalil

    In a different place, and at a different time, Tau Tafari would have led a simple life, married his childhood sweetheart, farmed land, and watched his children live under the same caste system that has always kept the people of Kerem down at heel. But these are special times, and Tau is no simple man. When Tau loses his Father, his grief turns to anger. Driven by thoughts of revenge, he flees his home and submits to a brutal system of “Testing”. His ultimate goal is to become a fighter in young In a different place, and at a different time, Tau Tafari would have led a simple life, married his childhood sweetheart, farmed land, and watched his children live under the same caste system that has always kept the people of Kerem down at heel. But these are special times, and Tau is no simple man. When Tau loses his Father, his grief turns to anger. Driven by thoughts of revenge, he flees his home and submits to a brutal system of “Testing”. His ultimate goal is to become a fighter in young Queen Tsioria’s guard. Through a series of bloody, Gladiator-style challenges, Tau begins to rise in rank. The more skilled he becomes, the closer he gets to his enemies. And that’s just where he wants them: within sword’s reach. Tau is neither gifted, nor the strongest warrior in his class, but his determination sets him apart. Break his right arm, and he’ll learn to use his left to hold a sword. Give him time to heal, and he’ll use both arms to wield twin blades and become a champion people root for: The Common of Kerem. In a strange twist of fate, Tau’s path crosses with Zuri’s, the beautiful girl from home he thought he’d left behind. As it turns out, she’s special: “Gifted”. Zuri is a powerful conduit between the corporeal world (Uhmlaba) and the Underworld (Isihogo). She can use her substantial mental gifts to enervate soldiers, and turn them into powerful killing machines that fight against the fearsome and merciless Xiddeen. The Rage of Dragons is a thrilling ride through a well-imagined world, where magic is real, and where the line between war and peace is precariously thin. Tau’s progress from commoner, to initiate, to champion is believable, and chronicled through as series of well-described, and wickedly choreographed battle scenes. I especially enjoyed the brotherhood and camaraderie Tau establishes with his “sword brothers” at Scale Jayyed where he trains, and where he learns that everyone has a story, even his foes. Most of all, I’m intrigued by the titular dragons who fight for the gifted humans who call them. They are slaves, but they are weapons, and I think there’s still a lot more to be said about their involuntary partnership with the humans they serve. This is the first installment in the Book of the Burning series, and I’m very much looking forward to a sequel. Dark Fantasy fans, and readers who enjoy strong, character-driven books will find much to love in Evan Winter’s breathtaking debut novel.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Mueller

    This is a book that really surprised me in the end. I enjoyed the beginning but felt it got a bit slow with all the training segments in the middle. But the end of the book was absolutely brilliant. The action just kept going, and everything that had happened up to that point all played a role. One of the best books I've read so far this year. Rating: 9.5/10

  9. 4 out of 5

    Vorgex

    I wrote a message to the author, and then it hit me that it would be nice to leave a review. So here's my edited message as a short review of The Rage of Dragons. First of all I have to compliment the cover art. It's crucial for a good first impression, and the artist nailed it. The prologue didn't capture my interest like other books have, but when I read further the prologue's effect showed. It clarified some things. Don't get me wrong, I freaking LOVED this book. During the read I have teared up, I wrote a message to the author, and then it hit me that it would be nice to leave a review. So here's my edited message as a short review of The Rage of Dragons. First of all I have to compliment the cover art. It's crucial for a good first impression, and the artist nailed it. The prologue didn't capture my interest like other books have, but when I read further the prologue's effect showed. It clarified some things. Don't get me wrong, I freaking LOVED this book. During the read I have teared up, I have gasped in shock, I have uttered weird noises of astonishment! It's well written, I connected with the characters, and at times it plays beautifully with the line between the dramatic and the comedic. It really managed to lighten the mood during some of it's darker chapters. I can't remember ever being more emotionally connected to a book. Honestly, that's a rare find. It's in my top three of all time, and having read 20-50 fantasy books a year for a decade, that's something. Even now, I feel like I've understated how much I loved The Rage of Dragons. I display it proudly on my bookshelf, and it will be re-read yearly. Thank you very much, Evan. I'm excited for the next part of the series.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Timepiggy

    Well put together Saw it on Reddit and thought I'd give it a try. The dragons and magic are done in a cool way, love a good training montage and this one doesn't disappoint. I rarely give 5 stars but definitely deserved here

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tammie Mathews

    Thank you Evan I haven't had time for a proper D&D read in a long time and this one caused me to stay up way past bed time!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Kapsar

    The author provided me an early copy of this book before it was released. While he describes the book as GoT meets Gladiator, I felt reminded of other series. This book, is really well written, the story is engaging and the magic system is well described, limited in some ways and over powered in others, but very well balanced. The story this reminded me most of, was Red Rising by Pierce Brown, which has similar themes of caste, loss, going beyond what is expected to be possible for your caste, e The author provided me an early copy of this book before it was released. While he describes the book as GoT meets Gladiator, I felt reminded of other series. This book, is really well written, the story is engaging and the magic system is well described, limited in some ways and over powered in others, but very well balanced. The story this reminded me most of, was Red Rising by Pierce Brown, which has similar themes of caste, loss, going beyond what is expected to be possible for your caste, etc... It also has a similar approach to working as a team and building skills through small scale training skirmishes (which is where I'm expecting the Gladiator comparison to come into play), but rather than feeling like an imitation of this sort of story, there's enough novel ideas playing out to keep things interesting. There is somethings that feel obvious, but given that this is Tau's story, that's to be forgiven, because it's the path is handled well. Upon further reflection, there feels like there is inspiration from Anthony Ryan's Blood Song series as well as a few bits of inspiration from the Warded Man. The only complaint I would have here, is the super human healing that everyone seems to go through which isn't really supposed to happen. There are some cases where characters just seem to push through the impossible, while having a broken rib, and then fit something absurd shortly there after. I didn't think that this was poorly done at all though. To be honest, I was typically swept away by the action to the point that I didn't really care. I definitely recommend this book if you want a light read, but with enough depth for the world that you'll want to come back for book two.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tasi Scanlon

    Wow! Really good book! This is my first book by this author and a great find in a desert for good quality authors that can deliver a story. A story that can be an escape from real life but can also lead you to reflect upon your personal prejudices as well as a comparison of prejudices in our community. This is a rare find indeed!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    Best Fantasy book I’ve read in years I saw this book in a targeted ad on Facebook and bought it on a whim. I stayed up late reading it, I read it in traffic, on my commute and during my lunch. Now I’m going to read it a second time.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dale Ashley

    Wow. This story was amazing. I loved the changes in the characters throughout. Very well written. I couldn't put this book down. I thought the plot was outstanding and unpredictable. Hadith was my favorite character, I think that his intellect was very valuable to the scale. My favorite mini-storyline was when Jayyed was telling Tau to wake up and see the truth about Kellan. I loved Tau's relentless need to execute his quest, but I was glad that he used better judgment. One thing that was confus Wow. This story was amazing. I loved the changes in the characters throughout. Very well written. I couldn't put this book down. I thought the plot was outstanding and unpredictable. Hadith was my favorite character, I think that his intellect was very valuable to the scale. My favorite mini-storyline was when Jayyed was telling Tau to wake up and see the truth about Kellan. I loved Tau's relentless need to execute his quest, but I was glad that he used better judgment. One thing that was confusing to me were some of the names/places and synonyms. I think that an index would be helpful for the reader because I found myself backtracking at times to try to get a handle on the terminology and places/groups of people. My favorite chapters are the two that were told from Tau's opponents' perspectives. Kellan and Daaso Headtaker. I thought that this was really creative and enjoyable to the reader. Overall, 5 stars and I can't wait until the story continues. Thanks!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Farrell

    An excellent fantasy book, with real scope to expand into an even better series. Bar the occasional chapter, the book is written from the point of view of a single protagonist, Tau Solarin. Whilst this means the book isn't as grand in scope as something by Brandon Sanderson for example, it does also mean there is no dead time. At all. Tau is a superb main character and there is a strong supplementary cast to give the book depth. I was recommended this book by someone who puts Tau at the top his a An excellent fantasy book, with real scope to expand into an even better series. Bar the occasional chapter, the book is written from the point of view of a single protagonist, Tau Solarin. Whilst this means the book isn't as grand in scope as something by Brandon Sanderson for example, it does also mean there is no dead time. At all. Tau is a superb main character and there is a strong supplementary cast to give the book depth. I was recommended this book by someone who puts Tau at the top his all time fantasy characters list and I can see why. The book really focuses on action, but the world building and magic system is built nicely and by the end there is a real sense that book two has an established platform from which to build the universe. It can't happen soon enough.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ina Lawanda Craft

    Best I've read in a long time I was really surprised. It started off pretty slow but when it picked up i couldn't put it down. I'm really not happy to know I've got to wait on the next book! It leaves you wanting more. Great book!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ed

    Brilliant I have read this book wanting nothing more than to find out what happens. Loved being in the head of Tau Solarin. The action and fast pace of the book kept me hooked from start to finish. Can't wait to read the next book!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Prebo

    Unique, gripping, and well written. There are as many dragon stories as there are zombie books but this one is more on several different levels. Sometimes dark, sometimes comical, sometimes heroic and nobel, and sometimes base and cowardly-basically all things human and mankind ability to be the true angels on Earth or its worse monsters.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Neil

    Highly recommend to any fan of sword & sorcery stories ... and maybe even for those who aren't typically. Really fun & entertaining read - especially being a debut novel, Evan Winter is now on my list of authors who I will quickly grab the next book they write. I will say I had a bit of a hard time with the names and wrapping my head around all the nuances of the caste system, but once my puny brain got it, I was totally bought in. Very ready for book 2.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dan Kelly

    Excellent Thoroughly enjoyed this book. I have read literally hundreds of fantasy stories and this is one of my favourites. A very interesting and different world with a main character who becomes strong not because he is a lost prince or the heir to some ancient magic but because he will push himself to the extremes of human endurance and beyond. Would recommend to anyone who enjoys stories of revenge, love, war and treachery

  22. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Thomas

    I was initially hesitant in reading this. I'm so glad I didn't back down! You experience the life of Tau Tafari. He believed his life to be nothing but simple, a route he believed to be already laid out in front of him. After experiencing the true life first hand, witnessing his father's death right before his eyes, Tau's life turns around. Instead of living that of a farmer, to be married and have children, Tau decides to take the path of a warrior. Before your eyes, you experience the excitemen I was initially hesitant in reading this. I'm so glad I didn't back down! You experience the life of Tau Tafari. He believed his life to be nothing but simple, a route he believed to be already laid out in front of him. After experiencing the true life first hand, witnessing his father's death right before his eyes, Tau's life turns around. Instead of living that of a farmer, to be married and have children, Tau decides to take the path of a warrior. Before your eyes, you experience the excitement of a kindhearted boy becoming headstrong and facing hardships he believes to be only right for him. In these hardships, Tau gains what he believes will weigh him down towards his one true goal. This plot itself was very involved and hasn't lost its touch. You not only seeing the journey in just Tau's eyes, but others close to him. Some seeing him as a demon or someone who has "lost his way" and in need of a helping hand.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    I'm conflicted with this book. I have 2 major issues with the book. First, the summary and world implies that there will be lots of strong female characters. The entire world is POC which is fantastic. But there is about 2 female characters that matter. One comes in at the very end and the second is the Childhood Crush who is included sparingly throughout the book. Mostly to just pine after Tau, have sex with him, and then help at the end. Don't read the book for romance. (view spoiler)[ And I'm I'm conflicted with this book. I have 2 major issues with the book. First, the summary and world implies that there will be lots of strong female characters. The entire world is POC which is fantastic. But there is about 2 female characters that matter. One comes in at the very end and the second is the Childhood Crush who is included sparingly throughout the book. Mostly to just pine after Tau, have sex with him, and then help at the end. Don't read the book for romance. (view spoiler)[ And I'm already a little wary of the Queen being all starry eyed with him at the end, honestly. (hide spoiler)] It doesn't have a lot of women characters, and it doesn't have a well written romance. The second thing is that I don't care about Tau, the protagonist. I started off liking him, even rooting for him, and then he doesn't show any growth until the very end. He's got tunnel vision, and for a revenge plan that's less than stellar. I honestly read this book thinking about how much more I'd of enjoyed it if we were following one of the side characters. I'm particularly fond of Kellan. What little we saw of Kana appealed to me as well. Udak would have been great, even. So, I don't mind Tau and he didn't ruin the book for me, but I found him lacking. I didn't read the book for his story. I read the book for the kingdom's story. But that's not enough for me to rush to buy the sequel. It's a good read and has a lot of good points. If you're thinking maybe, and it's not purely for romance or the women, I'd say go for it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    This was honestly so much better than I was expecting. It took me a second to get hooked, but I definitely did fall deep into this story. There was a lot of the world and terms that were thrown around in the beginning that I had no clue as to the meaning of. That made it harder to engage, but once I picked up on what was going on, the story also started to pick up as well. By the time I was half-way through, I was fully involved and unwilling to set the book down. That proved inconvenient since This was honestly so much better than I was expecting. It took me a second to get hooked, but I definitely did fall deep into this story. There was a lot of the world and terms that were thrown around in the beginning that I had no clue as to the meaning of. That made it harder to engage, but once I picked up on what was going on, the story also started to pick up as well. By the time I was half-way through, I was fully involved and unwilling to set the book down. That proved inconvenient since I was mid-vacation and my companion was very eager to do things that didn't involve staying in our room and reading books. Some people just don't understand the pull of a good story. Anyway, I did eventually get the chance to finish (by staying up til the AM hours of the night) and was thoroughly dismayed to realize that this wasn't a stand alone story and the next book has yet to be released. Such is life. I will definitely be picking up the sequel and hope it maintains the action and intensity of the first one. *fingers crossed*

  25. 4 out of 5

    Hayley

    A Good and Unique Read but some Missed Opportunities What I liked I really enjoyed Mr. Winter's worldbuilding for The Rage of Dragons. I found it exciting and interesting that he made a caste system for main fantasy culture. It was also good to see people of African type appearance in a fantasy story. It was different and pleasant to see a culture that wasn't made using western cultural principles. The reader really gets the sense that the Omehi are a complex people. The Omehi are also not an ide A Good and Unique Read but some Missed Opportunities What I liked I really enjoyed Mr. Winter's worldbuilding for The Rage of Dragons. I found it exciting and interesting that he made a caste system for main fantasy culture. It was also good to see people of African type appearance in a fantasy story. It was different and pleasant to see a culture that wasn't made using western cultural principles. The reader really gets the sense that the Omehi are a complex people. The Omehi are also not an idealized culture. With the Omehi Winter gives us a culture that is interesting, but I'm not certain I would want to be a part of. Another aspect of Winter's worldbuilding I found enjoyable and immersive, was his use of more archaic? forms or measurement and judging distance: hand-spans, finger-lengths, strides, ect. The historical fiction writer and reader in me loves that delivery of information that keeps one in the world, but also gives the information in a recognizable way. Moving on to more story aspects, Winter did something that I don't think I've seen in a military story before. [VERY MILD SPOILER] In the opening chapters Tau fights in defense of the city he lives near. He has had lots of sword fighting practice over the years with Jabari, so he's not afraid. However, when he gets involved in the fighting and kills in defense of his homeland he realizes that warfare is not for him or in him and he doesn't want to be involved in the killing. I thought this was really intriguing and thought provoking. However, with the descriptions of the story eluding to Gladiator I figured revenge was a strong component to the story, and the plans Tau was making to stay out of fighting turned on a dime. I'm okay with this, I like a revenge story too, but I couldn't pass up mentioning that unique bit of reaction in this review. [VERY MILD SPOILER OVER] Tau's determination is interesting to read. It comes off as filled with rage sometimes wreckless, I can't help but cheer for him. Winter is great with describing fight scenes, Tau is one hell of a fighter, his Scale [Military Unit] are no slouches either and you feel like you're right there seeing the fight. Also you can feel it. Winter does a fantastic job with the physicality of the fights and the emotions surging at the time. What I didn't like so much Winter doesn't describe his character's facial features, which for me makes it next to impossible to picture the characters. This in turn lead me to feel more disconnected from them. This didn't ruin my enjoyment of the story, but it did keep me at a certain distance from it. I understand that this could be a matter personal preference. I know some authors don't describe their characters faces on purpose to let the reader make the characters faces themselves, but with no guidance as to what their faces look like I can't make a picture of them in my mind. This too could be a completely personal problem, but I gott'a say I really hope it's not becoming a trend among authors. The caste system was both something I enjoyed in Winter's story and also thought could have been better. Unfortunately the caste is only a negative feature in the story. It is highly divisive with two castes the Nobles/Greaters and the Commons/Lessers and this is the only detail we are given as who is in what caste. There is no explanation of what the statuses entail or what duties or privileges go with either caste. I have the feeling that later stories in the series may involve the dismantling of this system, so showing it to be a negative aspect in people's lives will make the reader be invested in seeing its downfall, but giving it a greater nuance would have been good for the story I think. I have the feeling The Rage of Dragons could have been a five out of five amazing book for me with a change that has just occurred to me. I feel Jayyed is one of the best characters in this book. I have to say that I love mentor characters and as the leader and creator of Tau's Scale Jayyed I think definitely counts. I find his motivations in the story to be compelling and he is deeply sympathetic. I think the story could have been brought to an even greater higheight if Winter had written Jayyed as a deuteragonist. Having scenes or chapters from Jayyed's perspective would have been enlightening in worldbuilding, and I know the audience would sympathize with Jayyed's want to at least change, or dismantle the caste system. His older more cautious viewpoint would also be a refreshing and a nice aside to Tau's rage and determination. Also in a way they have the same motivation from the caste system and what it's doing, and it would be fascinating to see them realize this in each other. It would be emotionally complex to see Jayyed try to tether Tau's rage and abilities towards his goals, or at least try to, then see them come to some sort of agreement together. Perhaps in the end I was hoping for more complicated relationships between the characters? Lastly, I feel the book could have benefited from a world or country map, and I would definitely recommend one for future volumes. I understand the geography of a Peninsula, but they can vary a lot in shape Italy and Spain for examples. Winter makes references regions within the Peninsula, it gave a good sense of environmental diversity, but I also found I was just confused when I tried to imagine the holdings of the Omehi. [TLDR] Overall I found the Rage of Dragons to be a good read and I would recommend it to others, especially if they like fantasies with a great magic system, military stories, and stories of revenge, and also one whose looking for a non-Western based fantasy story. Hayley Gross ^_^

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amused

    Smashed it in a day Someone else described this book as Red Son meets Warded/Painted man with some Left Hand of God added in. Pretty much covers it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    James Hockley

    Rage of Dragons is a book that follows well-trodden fantasy traditions, but does it in its own way. And it definitely works! I really enjoyed this book, and would definitely recommend it to any fans of the genre. Nice. So, what is Rage of Dragons about? Well, yes, it does have dragons in it, but not as many as you might think. In fact, they’re positively scarce, albeit making something of an entrance at the most important moment. Anyway, enough about the dragons. This book is actually about a you Rage of Dragons is a book that follows well-trodden fantasy traditions, but does it in its own way. And it definitely works! I really enjoyed this book, and would definitely recommend it to any fans of the genre. Nice. So, what is Rage of Dragons about? Well, yes, it does have dragons in it, but not as many as you might think. In fact, they’re positively scarce, albeit making something of an entrance at the most important moment. Anyway, enough about the dragons. This book is actually about a young man called Tau, and Tau lives a familiar life in fantasy circles. He is of a lower class background, destined to be little more than battle-fodder, but when he suffers a great loss, he sets out to change all that. He sets out to change the way of things, and boy does he do that. Let the action commence! There are lots of things to admire in this book, but one of the best things is the pace and quality of writing. It does seem to take a little while to get going, but once we’re in, we’re in. I genuinely found myself wanting to read onto the next chapter, such was the quality of setup. Perhaps not something I stayed up all night to finish, but certainly a book I was looking forward to picking up again. The second great thing was the world itself. Now, this was a familiar fantasy world in that it is full of class systems, the downtrodden, dragons, magic, and all that good stuff. But despite holding common themes, it was all wrapped up into something quite unique. The world definitely seemed different, even though it was familiar, and this added to the engaging read. Nice. And finally, there are some great political twists here too. This could easily become a bash-crash novel with a very focused objective, which may have left it somewhat flat. But it is not only that. There is a higher political agenda here, and Tau finds himself getting caught up in it, which ramps up the story. This is good for the tale. Contrary to all this is the start. I really don’t know what it was, but until about a quarter of the way through, I struggled a touch. There is certainly action and excitement up front - the epilogue is a battle scene - but for some reason I just didn’t quite get the point. It may have been because I was fighting the challenging terminology (see below), or it may have been something else, but I urge you to read on. This is a great book once it gets going. As mentioned above, there is some challenging terminology here. Fantasy naming can be a bit wild at times, and here it is probably less wild and may actually be quite well structured. The problem is that I couldn’t see the structure, and so there were a lot of similar words that I didn’t have a proper handle of until quite a way through the book. Yikes. It’s certainly possible to get on with only a passing understanding of the local language, but it might have been nice to have had a bit of an easier ride! And finally, the fighting. Overall the fighting was really excellent, and I enjoyed it very much. And it is certainly an important part of the book, given Tau’s journey. But on reflection, I do wonder whether some of it pushed just a little too far. I like the rise of an underdog as much as the next person, but this underdog was something quite else. I just fear that he may have stepped a little over the line of realism (noting of course that this is a fantasy novel!) Overall, I really liked this book and would definitely recommend it to anyone who reads fantasy. If you are not keen on swordplay, then it might not be for you, but otherwise give it a go.

  28. 4 out of 5

    B

    As a debut novel work by the Author, The Rage of Dragons hits it out of the park for fans of the Fantasy genre. Written in the third person, limited, perspective that is relatively common to the genre- and modern fiction- most of the chapters focus on Tau (who walks the 'hero's path' in the novel). Roughly speaking - the first "act"- the shortest- of the book focuses on Tau as a young man who was quickly disillusioned with war, and longed to 'give it all up'- with or without a young lady whom he f As a debut novel work by the Author, The Rage of Dragons hits it out of the park for fans of the Fantasy genre. Written in the third person, limited, perspective that is relatively common to the genre- and modern fiction- most of the chapters focus on Tau (who walks the 'hero's path' in the novel). Roughly speaking - the first "act"- the shortest- of the book focuses on Tau as a young man who was quickly disillusioned with war, and longed to 'give it all up'- with or without a young lady whom he fancied. The second 'act'- by far the meatiest of the book- dealt with the immediate aftermath when that first act view 'struggled' to fulfill Tau's expectations. Due to the need to avoid 'spoilers', I will just say that the third act brings things together- relatively amazingly. A few notes: - First, the weakest part of the book- one that literally left me wondering if I should continue- was the prologue. I think on one page (on my kindle), I counted the use of the word 'savages' over 5x... While I have no problem with the word, the repeated re-use made me wonder if the author - frankly- was just of a limited lexicon. I can enthusiastically report, this was not the case. - Second, for fans of 'combat' fiction, or stark contrasts between 'good' and 'evil' this is largely in play here. Certainly, the author's visceral depictions of combat- be it training, 1:1 or otherwise- where top notch. - Third, as an extension of the above, some items likely will need to be fleshed out in subsequent volumes (and if not, those volumes could possibly suffer): for example, Tau is driven by an incident that was generally speaking, his fault. Yes, assuredly, he reacted to another event. However, I don't remember or recall a single thought given by Tau that had he... done anything differently- the entire basis for his drive would be irrelevant. - However, fourth, the author does repeatedly drive home the fact that 'strategy' and 'tactics' are not Tau's strong points. No, he's much more Conan than Sun Tzu. - Finally, fifth, while the book does end with a mild-cliff hanger (and, assuredly, ends abruptly) it does avoid any tendency to overstay its welcome. I devoured this book. As I said, the prologue was the weakest part- and it was pure takeoff after that. I look forward to the next in the series. Bottom line: Highly recommended debut. Read this book.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Walker

    I stumbled across this book via Kindle Unlimited, which is a bit like browsing through a flea market. Most of what you find is junk - cheap trinkets and knock-offs. Derivative sci-fi, fantasy that is a poor man's reimagining of Tolkien, etc. I like things with dragons, but that opens me up to even more dreck than normal. Most "dragon fantasy" is something along the lines of "boy/girl is an outcast, boy/girl stumbles across magic trinket/dragon's egg/enchanted sword, BOOM! Boy/girl is a dragon ri I stumbled across this book via Kindle Unlimited, which is a bit like browsing through a flea market. Most of what you find is junk - cheap trinkets and knock-offs. Derivative sci-fi, fantasy that is a poor man's reimagining of Tolkien, etc. I like things with dragons, but that opens me up to even more dreck than normal. Most "dragon fantasy" is something along the lines of "boy/girl is an outcast, boy/girl stumbles across magic trinket/dragon's egg/enchanted sword, BOOM! Boy/girl is a dragon rider and somehow saviour of the known universe!" Evan Winter's "The Rage of Dragons" is none of those things. This, ladies and gentlemen, is that most rare of beasts - an original bit of fantasy writing. The world is believable; the magic system makes sense, and doesn't rely on too many "deus ex machina" leaps of faith. The whole thing is consistent, creating a world that works, that is recognisable and conforms to its own internal laws. And the characters - ah. At last, some characters who show flaws, who improve, who relapse - characters, in short, who develop over the course of the story. Indeed, the main character is almost too dark - he's so absorbed in self-loathing and obsessed with revenge that he almost becomes an anti-hero. This allows for great internal conflict. The plot itself flows along beautifully. The author throws us in with a great opening scene, before jumping forward to show how things have degraded from the start. The addition of a caste system lends a whole new level of conflict, and there are a lot of intriguing possibilities for where the story might go. In short, this is one of the better fantasy books I've ever read, and a fantastic opening book to what I can only hope is a lengthy series. I'm totally gripped by the world Evan Winter has created, and can't wait to read more.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Espai

    Disons qu'il faut s'attendre à certains défauts avec The Rage of Dragons, mais ne pas s'y arrêter. Le début, bien que rempli de scènes d'actions, est plutôt lent d'un point de vue du rythme. Le réel élément perturbateur de l'histoire n'arrive pas avant le premier quart du livre. On a donc une longue introduction qui prend un tiers du bouquin, dans laquelle je ne me suis pas vraiment sentie concernée par l'histoire. Ajoutons à ça beaucoup trop de néologismes, tous commençant par la même lettre... L Disons qu'il faut s'attendre à certains défauts avec The Rage of Dragons, mais ne pas s'y arrêter. Le début, bien que rempli de scènes d'actions, est plutôt lent d'un point de vue du rythme. Le réel élément perturbateur de l'histoire n'arrive pas avant le premier quart du livre. On a donc une longue introduction qui prend un tiers du bouquin, dans laquelle je ne me suis pas vraiment sentie concernée par l'histoire. Ajoutons à ça beaucoup trop de néologismes, tous commençant par la même lettre... L'armée est en effet divisée entre les Ihagu, les Ihashe, les Indlovu et les Ingonyama, tous dirigés par des Inkokeli (et aussi les Isikolo, mais je n'ai jamais vraiment compris si c'est un titre ou un type de soldats). J'étais complètement perdue, et ça n'a pas arrangé mon immersion. Puis, une fois ce laborieux début-d'un-tiers passé... Tau, le personnage principal, prend son envol. Un peu de contexte : dans un monde où la classe sociale et la force physique sont corrélées, les Nobles font les guerriers les plus puissants, grâce à leur taille et leur constitution supérieure. Alors, Tau, le fils du peuple, né plus petit et plus faible, n'a littéralement aucune chance. Et pourtant, il fait preuve d'une détermination sans faille : il s'entraîne et s'entraîne et s'entraîne et n'abandonne jamais, même quand tout crie sa défaite. C'est vraiment sa pure force de caractère qui m'a traînée jusqu'à la fin du bouquin (avec, ok, cette divine illustration de couverture). C'est aussi ce qui a donné à The Rage of Dragons ce petit truc en plus. Blog - Babelio - Pinterest

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