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Den store jakten PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: Den store jakten
Author: Robert Jordan
Publisher: Published 2003 by Tiden (first published 1990)
ISBN: 9788210049668
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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Sentralt i historien står Den Gjenfødte Dragen, en ung mann ved navn Rand Al'Thor. Han er i besittelse av mektige krefter, som han må bruke i kampen mot Den Mørkeste. Og han må seire, ellers vil verden gå til grunne.

30 review for Den store jakten

  1. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    I say this all of the time, but reading old school fantasy books is like reading with a friend. And they remind me of when I was young. I don't know why. Maybe because I'm old school. Happy Reading! Mel ❤ I say this all of the time, but reading old school fantasy books is like reading with a friend. And they remind me of when I was young. I don't know why. Maybe because I'm old school. Happy Reading! Mel ❤️

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jessica ❁ ➳ Silverbow ➳ ❁ Rabid Reads-no-more

    2/1/16: Day 1 of WoT #2 buddy (re)read in BB&B ! We're only reading one book per month, so if you want to jump in, you've got plenty of time to squeeze in The Eye of the World and still participate. Reviewed by: Rabid Reads NOTICE: this reread is in preparation for finally biting the bullet and reading book 14. That means I HAVE NOT read book 14 yet. Please be mindful of this in the comments, both for me and for others who may or may not have progressed past this point in the series. Thank y 2/1/16: Day 1 of WoT #2 buddy (re)read in BB&B ! We're only reading one book per month, so if you want to jump in, you've got plenty of time to squeeze in The Eye of the World and still participate. Reviewed by: Rabid Reads NOTICE: this reread is in preparation for finally biting the bullet and reading book 14. That means I HAVE NOT read book 14 yet. Please be mindful of this in the comments, both for me and for others who may or may not have progressed past this point in the series. Thank you. For whatever reason, this is the installment that's held up the least well for me. Not b/c it's not awesome--it absolutely is--but b/c even MORE awesomeness is IMMINENT. And I know it (b/c fiendish rereader). SO. We have a Dragon Reborn and a Wolfbrother, but what's behind door #3? *raises hand* b/c I know, I know! *sighs* The Great Hunt is a concept that can be found in numerous mythologies, but (not surprisingly) my favorite versions have always been the ones with Fae roots. If you're unfamiliar, it's fairly simple: if the moon is particularly bright, and you hear a horn sounding in the distance, DO NOT LEAVE THE SAFETY OF YOUR HOME. B/c Fae on horses-that-don't-get-tired with hounds-that-have-super-senses (and may or may not have been human at some point), are out and about, hunting "big game" and NO GOOD can come of you getting caught up in that shit. Jordan's version is pretty nifty too. The Horn of Valere, prophecied to be found (just?) before the Last Battle, will call the greatest heroes who have ever lived to fight on behalf of the horn-sounder . . . whatever their intent may be . . . YES, you read that correctly. The greatest heroes of legend will be compelled to fight for either good or evil, depending on who gets their grubby lips on it first. So that's exciting. Which is kind of impressive if you think about it: a hunt for a brass instrument vs. a hunt for human prey? But yeah: " . . . for the grave is no bar to my call." *goosebumps* BUT. If I'm being honest, there are a couple of legitimate reasons that I didn't like this installment quite as much as the last one. You know, beyond being impatient for my favorite character to stop being an adolescent idiot. Like Lanfear. One of Forsaken, Lanfear has been used as a boogieman to scare children into behaving (a concept that I find horrific, incidentally . . . Does anyone actually do that? Tell their children that some super scary monster-person will get them while they're sleeping, if they don't do as they're told? I sincerely hope not . . .). Anyway, this early in the series, the Forsaken are mostly feared for nebulous follower-of-the-Dark-One reasons. However . . . we do learn a few things about Lanfear: 1. Before Lews Therin (the Dragon) met and married his wife Ilyena, Lanfear had been his lover. 2. Ultimately . . . the reason she joined the dark side is b/c hell hath no fury . . . YES, seriously . . . And she wants him back. Does not care that the Dragon Reborn is a completely different, maybe twenty-years-old model, when she herself probably had a couple of centuries under her belt before she was sealed inside the Dark One's prison for several thousand years. If that wasn't obnoxious enough--and trust me, it is--she still hasn't figured out that it was her obsession with power and acquiring ALL OF IT that drove Lews Therin away the first time. So we get to watch her numerous failed attempts to entice Dragon Reborn into seeking glory for himself. It's just sad. I mean, really . . . how can she claim to love him, yet willfully know nothing about him? Then there are the Seanchan . . . and the Seanchan freak me the hell out. Besides practicing numerous and varied types of slavery, which shows a terrifying lack of regard for human life . . . These people aren't just ethnocentric, they're an entire population brainwashed into wholeheartedly believing in the superiority of specific types of people and the inferiority of others . . . o.O Right. So in addition to that, they've tamed monsters (like grolm: bear-sized, three-eyed beasts with grayish green, lizard-like, impossible to penetrate with things like swords or arrows, hide, and sharp, hooked beak-like mouths) to the point of riding them like horses. And what do they wear when they ride their pet monsters? Metal armor lacquered and segmented to look like an insect carapace . . . to better match the mandibles and feelers on their helmets . . . Ye gods. I don't know about you guys, but I can't come up with a scarier image than a GIANT INSECT riding some kind of prehistoric-looking monster into battle. Oh, and the ground might just swallow you whole before you even get a chance to defend yourself, b/c wielders of the One Power? Yeah, they're one of the MANY previously mentioned enslaved people groups. Still a fantastic installment though. PLUS, *whispers* I may not have mentioned it, but WoT #3 brings ALL KINDS of awesome, so gird your loins, little fishy . . . and keep on swimmin'. My other reviews for this series: The Eye of the World (Wheel of Time, #1) by Robert Jordan The Dragon Reborn (Wheel of Time, #3) by Robert Jordan The Shadow Rising (Wheel of Time, #4) by Robert Jordan The Fires of Heaven (Wheel of Time, #5) by Robert Jordan Lord of Chaos (Wheel of Time, #6) by Robert Jordan A Crown of Swords (Wheel of Time, #7) by Robert Jordan The Path of Daggers (Wheel of Time, #8) by Robert Jordan Winter's Heart (Wheel of Time, #9) by Robert Jordan Crossroads of Twilight (Wheel of Time, #10) by Robert Jordan New Spring (Wheel of Time, #0) by Robert Jordan Highlights: (view spoiler)[1. Lan with Rand before audience with Amyrlin: "There is one rule, above all others, for being a man. Whatever comes, face it on your feet." As they approached the women’s apartments, Lan suddenly snapped, “Cat Crosses the Courtyard!” Startled, Rand instinctively assumed the walking stance as he had been taught, back straight but every muscle loose, as if he hung from a wire at the top of his head. It was a relaxed, almost arrogant, saunter. 2. Portal Stones: “Is that Hawkwing’s monument, Lord Rand?” Hurin asked uneasily. “It doesn’t look right, somehow.” Rand recognized the harsh, angular script that covered the face of the monument, and he recognized some of the symbols chiseled on the breadth, chiseled as tall as a man. The horned skull of the Dha’vol Trollocs. The iron fist of the Dhai’mon. The trident of the Ko’bal, and the whirlwind of the Ahf’frait. There was a hawk, too, carved near the bottom. With a wingspan of ten paces, it lay on its back, pierced by a lightning bolt, and ravens pecked at its eyes. The huge wings atop the spire seemed to block the sun. He heard Loial galloping up behind him. “I tried to tell you, Rand,” Loial said. “It is a raven, not a hawk. I could see it clearly.” Hurin turned his horse, refusing even to look at the spire any longer. “But how?” Rand said. “Artur Hawkwing won a victory over the Trollocs here. Ingtar said so.” “Not here,” Loial said slowly. “Obviously not here. ‘From Stone to Stone run the lines of it, between the worlds that might be.’ I’ve been thinking on it, and I believe I know what ‘the worlds that might be’ are. Maybe I do. Worlds our world might have been if things had happened differently. Maybe that’s why it is all so . . . washed- out looking. Because it’s an ‘if,’ a ‘maybe.’ Just a shadow of the real world. In this world, I think, the Trollocs won. Maybe that’s why we have not seen any villages or people.” 3. Trollocs as puppets in the Foregate. It's just cool. The end. 4. Fly in the Seanchan ointment: “Where are you . . . we . . . going?” Seta said, quickly adding, “If I may ask?” “Into the lions’ den,” Elayne told her. “To dance with the Dark One,” Min said. (hide spoiler)] Forsaken: (view spoiler)[1. The Forsaken, thirteen of the most powerful wielders of the One Power in an Age filled with powerful wielders, has been sealed up in Shayol Ghul along with the Dark One, sealed away from the world of men by the Dragon and the Hundred Companions. And the backblast of the sealing had tainted the male half of the True Source, and all the male Aes Sedai, those cursed wielders of the Power, went mad and broke the world, tore it apart like a pottery bowl smashed on rocks, ending the Age of Legends before they died, rotting while they still lived. (hide spoiler)] Foresight: (view spoiler)[1. "Daughter of the Night, she walks again. The ancient war, she yet fights. Her new lover she seeks, who shall serve her and die, yet serve still. Who shall stand against her coming? The Shining Walls shall kneel. Blood feeds blood. Blood calls blood. Blood is, and blood was, and blood shall ever be. The man who channels stands alone. He gives his friends for sacrifice. Two roads before him, one death beyond dying, one to life eternal. Which will he choose? Which will he choose? What hand shelters? What hand slays? Blood feeds blood. Blood calls blood. Blood is, and blood was, and blood shall ever be. Luc came to the Mountains of Dhoom. Isam waited in the high passes. The hunt is now begun. The Shadow's hounds now course, and kill. One did live, and one did die, but both are. The Time of Change has come. Blood feeds blood. Blood calls blood. Blood is, and blood was, and blood shall ever be. The Watchers wait on Toman's Head. The seed of the Hammer burns the ancient tree. Death shall sow, and summer burn, before the Great Lord comes. Death shall reap, and bodies fail, before the Great Lord comes. Again the seed slays ancient wrong, before the Great Lord comes. Now the Great Lord comes. Now the Great Lord comes. Blood feeds blood. Blood calls blood. Blood is, and blood was, and blood shall ever be. Now the Great Lord comes. "Now, 'the ancient tree,'" Verin said, immersed in her own thoughts. "There have always been rumors--no more than that--that while the nation of Almoth still lived, they had a branch of Avendesora, perhaps even a living sapling. And the banner of Almoth was 'blue for the sky above, black for the earth below, with the spreading Tree of Life to join them.' Of course, Taraboners call themselves the Tree of Man, and claim to be descended from rulers and nobles in the Age of Legends . . . " 2. “Twice and twice shall he be marked, twice to live, and twice to die. Once the heron, to set his path. Twice the heron, to name him true. Once the Dragon, for remembrance lost. Twice the Dragon, for the price he must pay.” “Twice dawns the day when his blood is shed. Once for mourning, once for birth. Red on black, the Dragon’s blood stains the rock of Shayol Ghul. In the Pit of Doom shall his blood free men from the Shadow.” (hide spoiler)] Insight: (view spoiler)[1. A small, age-dark ivory carving of a man holding a sword. The fellow who sold it claimed if you held it long enough you started to feel warm. 2. “A quarterstaff,” he said, surprised. “I didn’t know Ogier carried weapons, Loial.” "Usually we do not,” the Ogier replied almost curtly. “Usually. The price has always been too high.” (hide spoiler)] Musings: (view spoiler)[1. Liandrin peered at Elayne and Min. The late afternoon sunlight, slanting through the branches, shadowed their faces beneath the hoods of their cloaks. “So,” she said finally, still watching those two. “I had made arrangements for you to be taken care of, but as you are here, you are here. Four can make this journey as well as two.” “Taken care of, Liandrin Sedai?” Elayne said. “I do not understand.” “Child, you and that other are known as friends of these two. Do you not think there are those who would question you when they are found to be gone? Do you believe the Black Ajah would be gentle with you just because you are heir to a throne? Had you remained in the White Tower, you might not have lived the night.” Umm . . . b/c you probably "arranged" to have them killed, you shiesty broad. (hide spoiler)] It makes me laugh: (view spoiler)[1. "What are you doing?" he demanded when he caught his breath. "Those are my clothes!" One of the women sniffed an poked a finger through a tear in the sleeve of his only coat, then added it to the pile on the floor. 2. Shaken at finding Trollocs in the heart of Fal Dara keep, he did the form so badly Lan would have stalked off in disgust. 3. So why aren’t you gone?” Rand shrugged. “I was going, but first the Amyrlin came, and then the Horn was stolen, and the dagger, and Moiraine said Mat was dying, and. . . . Light, I thought I could stay with you until we found the dagger, at least; I thought I could help with that. Maybe I was wrong.” “You came because of the dagger?” Mat said quietly. He rubbed his nose and grimaced. “I never thought of that. I never thought you wanted to. . . . Aaaah! Are you feeling all right? I mean, you aren’t going mad already, are you?” Rand dug a pebble out of the ground and threw it at him. 4. Verin glanced at Perrin, and he shifted uneasily. “A new sniffer, just when you lose your old one. How . . . providential." 5. Gawyn scratched his head, then shook it. “Well, if it has anything to do with Rand al’Thor, be sure you don’t let Elaida hear of it. She has been at me like a Whitecloak Questioner three times since we arrived. I do not think she means him any—” He gave a start; there was a woman crossing the garden, a woman in a red-fringed shawl. “ ‘Name the Dark One,’ ” he quoted, “ ‘and he appears.’ I do not need another lecture about wearing my shirt when I’m out of the practice yards. Good morning to you all.” My sister and I say this instead of "speak of the devil." True story. 6. “Thom, I know you said a clean break, but I had to get away from those women. All they wanted to talk about was their husbands being away, but they were already hinting at other things.” Thom choked on his wine, and Rand slapped his back. “You drink too fast, and something always goes down the wrong way. Thom, they think I am plotting with Barthanes, or maybe Galldrian, and I don’t think they will believe me when I say I’m not. I just needed an excuse to leave them.” Thom stroked his long mustaches with one knuckle and peered across the room at the three women. They were still standing together, watching Rand and him. “I recognize those three, boy. Breane Taborwin alone would give you an education such as every man should have at least once in his life, if he can live through it. Worried about their husbands. I like that, boy.” 7. Loial was twirling the stem of a trueheart blossom between his fingers. “Did you go picking flowers?” Rand asked. “Erith gave it to me.” Loial watched the yellow petals spin. “She really is very pretty, even if Mat does not see it.” “Does that mean you don’t want to go with us after all?” Loial gave a start. “What? Oh, no. I mean, yes. I do want to go. She only gave me a flower. Just a flower.” He took a book out of his pocket, though, and pressed the blossom under the front cover. As he returned the book, he murmured to himself, barely loud enough for Rand to hear, “And she said I was handsome, too.” Mat let out a wheeze and doubled over, staggering along clutching his sides, and Loial’s cheeks colored. “Well . . . she said it. I didn’t.” Perrin rapped Mat smartly on the top of his head with his knuckles. “Nobody ever said Mat was handsome. He’s just jealous.” “That’s not true,” Mat said, straightening abruptly. “Marisa Ayellin thinks I’m handsome. She told me so more than once.” “Is Marisa pretty?” Loial asked. “She has a face like a goat,” Perrin said blandly. I LOVE this early banter between the Big Three. 8. “I like older men,” she told him. “I like men with education, and wit. I have no interest in farms, or sheep, or shepherds. Especially boy shepherds.” With a sigh, she smoothed back the hair from his face; he had silky hair. “But then, you aren’t a shepherd, are you? Not anymore. Light, why did the Pattern have to catch me up with you? Why couldn’t I have something safe and simple, like being shipwrecked with no food and a dozen hungry Aielmen?” (hide spoiler)]

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nimrod Daniel

    The Eye of The world has some problems, but this book totally nailed it! The Great Hunt is significantly better in almost every aspect. Book 1 had serious pacing issues and is somewhat generic as it reminded me LoTR in a few ways. It was ok and very average, but not much more than that. It showed some potential, especially toward the ending, but I expected much more from it. Not true true for book 2, though, as Jordan solved a few problems and upped his game. Big Time. The writing style is just a The Eye of The world has some problems, but this book totally nailed it! The Great Hunt is significantly better in almost every aspect. Book 1 had serious pacing issues and is somewhat generic as it reminded me LoTR in a few ways. It was ok and very average, but not much more than that. It showed some potential, especially toward the ending, but I expected much more from it. Not true true for book 2, though, as Jordan solved a few problems and upped his game. Big Time. The writing style is just as good as book 1 was, but the book is a lot better structure-wise, and always things seem to happen, with almost no slow chapters that go nowhere. There is really interesting world-building here, as we get to know a lot more places, including The White Tower. New Enemies are introduced – Seanchan, which seem to have a very intriguing culture, we learn more about The White Cloaks, Padan Fain, The Forsaken, and get some glimpses into The Age of Legends. As for Characters, Rand gets much more depth and I really start to like him. There’s a lot of development when it comes to Nynaeve and Egwene, both are slowly becoming my favorite characters. Nynaeve rocks, really, I like that girl. Even though Perrin and Matt seem like they have important roles, we don’t really get to know them much better in book 2. Perrin was pretty much well-drawn in book 1, but he didn’t evolve much in book 2. Matt was ok in both books, but not much more than that. New Aes Sedai are being introduced – Elayne and Min, who join Nynaeve and Egwene at The White Tower, The Amyrlin herself , Verin, and Liandrin from the Red Aja. I don’t want to reveal much, so I refrained from telling anything in regard to the plot. But the plot is very engaging, I always wanted to know what happens next. Epic fantasy at its best! To conclude, The Great Hunt is a brilliant book. One of the most enjoyable books I’ve read this year. 4.5-4.75/5

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dana Ilie

    There is so much going on in this book, we get to see a few familiar faces when some of the minor characters from the first book make unexpected reappearances but we also have a lot of new people to meet, some you'll immediately love and others will make you much more wary. It's hard to know who to trust and there are definitely lots of side plots and foreshadowing going on that I think will make more sense on a reread (and I can pretty much guarantee I'll be rereading this series again in the f There is so much going on in this book, we get to see a few familiar faces when some of the minor characters from the first book make unexpected reappearances but we also have a lot of new people to meet, some you'll immediately love and others will make you much more wary. It's hard to know who to trust and there are definitely lots of side plots and foreshadowing going on that I think will make more sense on a reread (and I can pretty much guarantee I'll be rereading this series again in the future to test that theory!). Once again I was pulled straight into this story, it starts a little slower but the pace really ramps up in the second half and I'm so invested in the characters that even when there's not a great deal happening I'm just so happy to be spending time with them all. While I wouldn't quite place this series as a favourite yet it's definitely heading in that direction and I'm sure it will be on the list well before I reach the final book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bookdragon Sean

    This was no where near as good as the first novel in the series; it completely lacked the initial plot driver that its predecessor wielded. Previously, the innocent, and young, protagonists were taken away from their homes as they were forced to flee for their lives. I wanted to find out exactly why this was going on; thus, I stormed through it. Instead, this premise of this book is Rand attempting to escape from his destiny, which, of course, is pure folly because one does not escape fate: one This was no where near as good as the first novel in the series; it completely lacked the initial plot driver that its predecessor wielded. Previously, the innocent, and young, protagonists were taken away from their homes as they were forced to flee for their lives. I wanted to find out exactly why this was going on; thus, I stormed through it. Instead, this premise of this book is Rand attempting to escape from his destiny, which, of course, is pure folly because one does not escape fate: one does not escape the wheel of time. Reverse character development I was a little disappointed with this because I just don’t like reluctant heroes. Well, at least not in this sense. Rand began to annoy me so much at the start of this because by the end of the last novel, I felt that he had found his courage, and he’d overcome his reluctant nature; it was like his character development had gone backwards and taken him to an early state of the previous novel. Thankfully, this didn’t last too long as the wheel forced him to act; he had to become the dragon reborn otherwise he would have fallen to his enemy. I’m glad he found his bravery, again. But, I felt like he had already gained it, and that this novel was padded out with development that had already been achieved. I wanted this from the start: Rand’s full potential is obviously something he's not fully aware of, although it's clear to the reader, and every other character he may encounter, of what he will one day be able to do. It’s like he's the only person in this world who doesn’t truly see what he is, and what he's capable of; it’s beginning to feel a little idiotic. When he chases after the horn, during the great hunt, the depths of his powers begin to unravel along with the true nature of this series. He is learning who he is, again, for the second time. I do hope the author doesn’t back track like this again because I want to enjoy this series completely and whole heartedly instead of having my precious reading time wasted with repetetive material. This isn’t just Rand’s story, thankfully. Many of the side characters form the last novel are beginning to develop more of their own personal story arcs. I think this made the story much stronger because if this was just about Rand, exclusively, I’d honestly stop reading. Through doing this the author is slowly revealing some of the mysteries of his fantasy world. Nynaeve had many point of view chapters, as did Egwene. I think this is the start of a transition away from a Rand central series. Hopefully, they will be just as important to the overall plot as this reluctant hero. He’s a rather tepid protagonist, and at this point I think he needs a reason to face his destiny. Perhaps, his relatives should die, or one of his friends, to give him an actuall reason to fight. However, despite more point of view characters, I think the chapter placement was incredibly poor, and plain frustrating. What I mean is that there were four to five chapters of Rand’s story in one massive bulk; this was then interrupted by a single, or sometimes double, chapter from another point of view. It would then go back to Rand. I think the story would have flowed much better if Rand’s chapters were broken up a little more, and had no more than two or three chapters together. The result of placing chapters in the way that Jorden did is not seeing what happened to Mat and Perrin for almost three hundred pages. I found this very annoying. The pacing was very off. Is this still perfect fantasy? Despite my grievances with the protagonist and chapter placement, I still think this is a great series. This is everything I like in epic fantasy, and hopefully will continue to be so. The magic system is complex and interesting, and the different races/cultures are diverse and well thought out. The complexity of this fantasy universe is what makes this series enjoyable for me. I just hope that Rand retains the character development he has gained twice because if I have to read more about his reluctant nature, and him trying to run away, I may come to view this series as unnecessarily packed out. Hopefully that won’t happen, but time will tell. This was not as accomplished as the first novel, but was enjoyable to an extent. It may be just the side characters that saved this book for me, However, I do think this series creates a lot of apprehension to how it will all end, and where the characters will end. I find books like this tend to be somewhat predictable, but I haven’t had that with the Wheel of Time so far. I’m not entirely sure how it will end, but I do want to see Mordeth again. And it would also be grear to see more of Perrin, my favourite character, because in this novel he felt like furniture. The Wheel of time: 1. Eye of the World- An unoriginal five stars 2. The Great Hunt- A reluctant three stars 3. The Dragon Reborn- A well-developed four stars 4. The Shadow Rising- A strong four stars 5. The Fires of Heaven- A slow two stars "And it came to pass in those days, as it had come before and would come again, that the Dark lay heavy on the land and weighed down the hearts of men, and the green things failed, and hope died. And men cried out to the Creator, saying, O Light of the Heavens, Light of the World, let the Promised One be born of the mountain, according to the prophecies, as he was in ages past and will be in ages to come. Let the Prince of the Morning sing to the land that green things will grow and the valleys give forth lambs. Let the arm of the Lord of the Dawn shelter us from the Dark, and the great sword of justice defend us. Let the Dragon ride again on the winds of time."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Manju

    While reading Eye of the World, I kept seeing it’s similarities with LoTR but this book simply outshine its predecessor in every way. While first book was a drag in the middle chapters, this one has no such issue and that made it a better reading experience. This book picks up from where Eye of the World has ended. Horn of Valere has been stolen and it is crucial to get it back before it fell into evil hands and dead heroes could be called back from the graves. So Rand, who is too eager to leave While reading Eye of the World, I kept seeing it’s similarities with LoTR but this book simply outshine its predecessor in every way. While first book was a drag in the middle chapters, this one has no such issue and that made it a better reading experience. This book picks up from where Eye of the World has ended. Horn of Valere has been stolen and it is crucial to get it back before it fell into evil hands and dead heroes could be called back from the graves. So Rand, who is too eager to leave Aes Sedai behind, along with Matt and Perrin went on to get back the Horn but it’s not so easy as they’re not the only one looking for the legendary Horn. This is a long book and had tons of characters where everyone pop up out of nowhere as the need arise. Some were new and scary; others were beautiful but equally horrible characters. What made this book a real pain was the secrets that Rand, Mat, and Perrin kept from each other. This book should have been cut by 100 or so pages if these goons had just trusted each other with their secrets. While most of the characters get a chance to shine in this book, two outshines everyone else for me. First was Rand. He has come a long way from the farm boy we first met in Eye of the World. He has power now but he is scared to use as he don’t want to get mad (as people have drilled it in his mind, the more one touch Source, the more closer they get to insanity). I love the part where this mental struggle was described. He wanted to help and yet also remains hidden but in the guy accepts his duty and does what was necessary. Second character that won my heart in this instalment was Nynaeve. I just love this girl. She is stubborn, get easily angry and yet she cares deeply. She doesn’t think twice before facing evil if someone she loves is in trouble. She has flaws but she is just too good a character to deserve hate or dislike. It was a great story (specially last five chapters) and fared much better than I had expected from this. Now my expectation are sky high from Dragon Reborn.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Markus

    “And it shall come to pass that what man made shall be shattered, and the Shadow shall lie across the Pattern of Age, and the Dark One shall once more lay his hand upon the world of man. Women shall weep and men quail as the nations of the earth are rent like rotting cloth. Neither shall anything stand nor abide... Yet one shall be born to face the Shadow, born once more as he was born before and shall be born again, time without end. The Dragon shall be Reborn, and there shall be wailing and gna “And it shall come to pass that what man made shall be shattered, and the Shadow shall lie across the Pattern of Age, and the Dark One shall once more lay his hand upon the world of man. Women shall weep and men quail as the nations of the earth are rent like rotting cloth. Neither shall anything stand nor abide... Yet one shall be born to face the Shadow, born once more as he was born before and shall be born again, time without end. The Dragon shall be Reborn, and there shall be wailing and gnashing of teeth at his rebirth. In sackcloth and ashes shall he clothe the people, and he shall break the world again by his coming, tearing apart all ties that bind. Like the unfettered dawn shall he blind us, and burns us, yet shall the Dragon Reborn confront the Shadow at the Last battle, and his blood shall give us the Light. Let tears flow, O ye people of the world. Weep for your salvation." The Great Hunt begins right where The Eye of the World left off, with our heroes still sheltering within the walls of Fal Dara. But soon enough, the fragile peace is shattered. The Amyrlin Seat arrives from Tar Valon, with dozens of Aes Sedai by her side. The Horn of Valere is mysteriously stolen from within the keep itself, along with the terrible dagger from Shadar Logoth. And from the borderlands in the far north, a new journey begins to recover what was stolen. Already in the first few pages of the prologue, the reader is made aware of the dangers that lurk in the shadows. The darkfriends are everywhere. Nobles from all across the nations secretly serve the Great Lord of the Dark. Even the Children of the Light have been infiltrated by the servants of the Shadow. And in the halls of Tar Valon roams the Black Ajah; an eight Ajah and a secret fraternity containing those of the Aes Sedai who have given themselves to the Dark One. While the battle rages on between light and shadow, new forces emerge on the horizon to make their impact on the world. In the east, groups of Aielmen come out of the Spine of the World in search of the Dragon Reborn. On the western shores, the Seanchan, claiming to be the descendants of Artur Hawkwing's armies, arrive from beyond the Aryth ocean to conquer the world once more. And in Cairhien, Daes dae'mar, the Great Game, is being played by the noble houses with increasing brutality and ruthlessness, and the threat of civil war is becoming more and more real. "It is never over, al'Thor." The characters are what really shape this book, for good or ill, and one of the most interesting characters from the world of the Wheel of Time is Padan Fain. From being a seemingly mad darkfriend in the dungeons of Fal Dara, he is sprung from his prison when the Horn is stolen, and after going along with the group of Trollocs and darkfriends for a while, he assumes leadership of it by nailing a Myrddraal to a village wall. From that point on, Fain becomes a villainous mastermind. The matter of the main characters is sadly enough a totally different one. On the positive side, Mat and Perrin seem to be improving by each passing chapter. Egwene is as she was in the first book: a dull, uninteresting character with not much of a personality at all. And Nynaeve continues to astound me with her uncontrollable temper and her completely unfounded hatred towards Moiraine. Nevertheless, there is only one reason why this book got only four stars from me, and that reason even has a name: Rand al'Thor. I know some of you who read this will not agree with what I'm saying, but so far Rand is just the worst main character I've ever read about. He refuses to acknowledge the truth of anything, he shuns and apparently even despises those who would help him and accuses them of trying to use him, and he's blind towards being manipulated by mostly everyone else. Nynaeve can be quite irritating occasionally, but Rand constantly left me wanting to throw the book in a wall somewhere. Fortunately there are more than enough interesting supporting characters to read about: Geofram Bornhald, such a rarity as a benevolent Whitecloak commander; the beautiful and mysterious lady Selene, encountered by Rand and Loial in a different world; Bayle Domon, Verin Sedai and many more. The Great Hunt is in most aspects a better book than The Eye of the World. The writing is flawless, and both the storyline and the setting is perhaps even more interesting in the second volume than in the first. I considered giving this book five stars like I gave that one, but in the end I came to the conclusion that Rand al'Thor alone was by far enough reason to remove one star (at points when reading I was wondering if this was a three-star read), and other main characters were not good enough for a five-star rating either. In the end though, the book was entertaining enough with a great ending, and it managed to build the suspense leading to the next volume in the series. Let the Dragon ride again on the winds of time. Wheel of Time reviews: #1 The Eye of the World #2 The Great Hunt #3 The Dragon Reborn #4 The Shadow Rising #5 The Fires of Heaven #6 Lord of Chaos #7 A Crown of Swords #8 The Path of Daggers #9 Winter's Heart #10 Crossroads of Twilight #11 Knife of Dreams #12 The Gathering Storm #13 Towers of Midnight #14 A Memory of Light

  8. 5 out of 5

    David - proud Gleeman in Branwen's adventuring party

    Loved this one even more than the first book in the series! The world-building is so rich and vast, and the characters are very compelling. This book was so good, I was almost grateful for my hospital time, since it gave me more time to read! (See, there's always a silver lining!) Also, as of this book, Nynaeve has officially surpassed Moiraine as my favorite Wheel of Time character! FULL REVIEW TO COME

  9. 5 out of 5

    Robin (Bridge Four)

    If you’ve read a few reviews by me you might know that I’m a huge fan of Brandon Sanderson. This is one reason that 2016 is the year of the Wheel for me since Sanderson finished out this series. As I move along in this series I can see how BS got some of his roots from Jordan. They distinctively have different voices to be sure but one of the reasons I’m enjoying The Wheel of Time series is because of the intricate world building that is going on and the layers that are being set up. This book i If you’ve read a few reviews by me you might know that I’m a huge fan of Brandon Sanderson. This is one reason that 2016 is the year of the Wheel for me since Sanderson finished out this series. As I move along in this series I can see how BS got some of his roots from Jordan. They distinctively have different voices to be sure but one of the reasons I’m enjoying The Wheel of Time series is because of the intricate world building that is going on and the layers that are being set up. This book is over twenty years old but you can’t really tell and that is one of the coolest things about fantasy is they can stand up to the test of time since there is an entire new world in every single one and so it never really feels dated. The Eye of the World reminded me of The Lord of the Rings in quite a few ways and while for the most part The Great Hunt is moving away from that feeling there is still one part that very much reminded me of Tolkien. The Great Hunt is all about the Horn of Valere. Whoever blows the horn calls an army of dead heroes to fight with them….I’m pretty sure I saw that somewhere else. But that is about the only thing that really reminded me of LotRs this time around. The world continues to get a little bigger for our group from The Two Rivers. There are new people, customs, places and danger seems to be EVERYWHERE. It seems that most of the book is about Rand since he seems to be the very reluctant and ridiculously stubborn hero. Temptations abound as various characters try to pull him into their machinations including a new beautiful woman Selene. I hated her immediately and seriously why does every woman (except Nynaeve of course) need to be in love with Rand??? Why can’t Perrin or Mat find someone interested in them??? I was sure I knew who she really was from the beginning and that can be nothing but trouble for Rand so I hope all the stubbornness pays off in the end. Rand struggles with the fate that keeps calling him. He is so hell bent on going the opposite direction the Aes Sadai wants him to go he is easy to manipulate. “I have purposely let him think I no longer have any interest in him, that he may go where he pleases for all of me.” She raised her hands as the Amyrlin opened her mouth. “It was necessary, Siuan. Rand al’Thor was raised in the Two Rivers, where Manetheren’s stubborn blood flows in every vein, and his own blood is like rock beside clay compared to Manetheren’s. He must be handled gently, or he will bolt in any direction but the one we want.” All the people from the Two Rivers seem to be incredibly naïve, except Nynaeve and I can’t help but yell at them sometimes in my head for the choices they make. While Rand’s Journey was pretty interesting especially to the final showdown in the book I liked learning about the rituals and training of the Aes Sadai more. Nynaeve and Egwene’s time at the white tower and after was probably the most interesting part of the story for me. Learning what trials Nynaeve had to go through for part of her training was so intense and actually a little heartbreaking. “I do not know what is happening, Nynaeve, but I feel as if I were losing you. I could not bear that.” He put a hand in her hair; closing her eyes, she pressed her cheek against his fingers. “Stay with me, always.” But the run in with the Seanchan and learning what they do with women who can channel was the most horrible and intense thing in the book for me. Egwene and Nynaeve have come far from where they started out and I’m very interested in seeing what becomes of them as the books continue. Best side character for me is Loial. The Ogier is a great addition and I really enjoyed going into another stedding and meeting a few other Ogier. Plus could it be that Loial might have a crush. If that wasn’t the cutest thing ever I don’t know what it. A few issues I had They are really silly but I find this with quite a few older high fantasy novels. People know each other for a few pages and BOOM they are in love or speaking of marriage and such. Lan and Nynaeve are a good example of this. I like that they have this longing and forbidden romance of sorts happening between them. I’m a girl and I really like a little romance with my fantasy but I also like a little build up. Still at least there is a little bit on the romance side of life and I am rooting for them even though there wasn’t much build up. “I must go now, Nynaeve mashiara. The Amyrlin wishes to leave before midday, and there is much yet to be done. Perhaps we will have time to talk on the journey to Tar Valon.” He turned and was gone, striding down the hall. Nynaeve touched her cheek. She could still feel where he had touched her. Mashiara. Beloved of heart and soul, it meant, but a love lost, too. Lost beyond regaining. The other issue I sometimes have is that it seems like every core member suffers from what my friend Gavin coined quite well Two Rivers Idiocy. At some key moment in the book one of the crew from The Two Rivers will do something that is completely stupid. ’Hey we need to sneak out of here under no circumstances use magic. Two paragraphs later: ’Draws in all the magic to use it. *sigh*. Overall This is good Epic High Fantasy. Sure there are smaller stories arcs being told but there are prophecies to be confronted and evil to destroy. There are epic journeys that need to be taken and bad guys all over the place, some of them even think they are the good guys White Cloaks I’m looking at you. If you enjoy epic journeys then this series seems to be exactly what you are looking for. Plus good news is that it is finished no waiting years between books. Audio Note: Kate Reading and Michael Kramer (who also do The Stormlight Archives by Brandon Sanderson *wink, wink*) are fantastic. This is very well performed if you are a fan of audio.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Liam Degnan

    "Yet one shall be born to face the Shadow, born once more as he was born before and shall be born again, time without end. The Dragon shall be Reborn" A Full Five Stars: ✰✰✰✰✰. This book really did it for me. In The Eye of the World, Jordan spends a lot of time laying foundations for the characters, and for the plot as a whole, which made for a very slow experience that required a lot of patience. The worldbuilding and character development, while still very good, was done at an extremely g "Yet one shall be born to face the Shadow, born once more as he was born before and shall be born again, time without end. The Dragon shall be Reborn" A Full Five Stars: ✰✰✰✰✰. This book really did it for me. In The Eye of the World, Jordan spends a lot of time laying foundations for the characters, and for the plot as a whole, which made for a very slow experience that required a lot of patience. The worldbuilding and character development, while still very good, was done at an extremely gradual pace that left me wondering if it was ever actually going to take off. The story felt slow and poorly paced as a result, even though I still thought it was a great book. In this book Jordan finally begins to build on the foundations he laid in book one. Looking back, I'm actually glad that it moved as slowly as it did because the patience required to get through it definitely pays off once you reach this book, in so many ways. "There shall be wailing and gnashing of teeth at his rebirth. In sackcloth and ashes shall he clothe the people, and he shall break the world again by his coming, tearing apart all ties that bind." The Story: Best word I can think to describe the nature of the story in this book is multi-faceted. Originally, the overall plot of the series seems almost too simplistic in nature, and by the end of book one we don't really have anywhere near a full scope of what to expect. That changed pretty drastically in this book, and the change was a very positive one. Multiple threads were expertly woven into this story, through a myriad of POVs. We have our primary cast of characters in the form of the five Emond's fielder's (Rand, Mat, Perrin, Egwene, and Nynaeve), but sprinkled throughout the book we also get small glimpses into the lives of men and women spread out all over the continent. We see things from the perspective of a ship's captain that we met in book one; we get a POV from the perspective of a general among the religious elite. Moraine, the Aes Sedai, gets some air time. Even the villain has a POV in this book, which was an excellent inclusion, and really added a lot to the book. The first book didn't have a villain beyond "The Dark Lord", who we know nothing about. Combine this with the fact that this book is no longer just the simple "Good vs. Evil" trope, and you get something that is truly unique and no longer feels borrowed. There are so many conflicting sides that you're left to wonder who is with who and who is actually against everybody else. It sounds like it would be confusing, but Jordan did an incredible job of bringing it all together. Each thread that was woven concluded perfectly, with some genuinely unexpected twists, which is another thing worth mentioning. This book had a totally satisfying ending. If a book like this is going to get a high rating from me, the last 100 pages had better be incredible, because if I'm going to read 900 pages worth of material, there needs to be a substantial pay off in the end. You will not be disappointed. "Like the unfettered dawn shall he blind us, and burns us, yet shall the Dragon Reborn confront the Shadow at the Last battle, and his blood shall give us the Light." Worldbuilding & Character Development: The worldbuilding in this book was simply fantastic, and the great worldbuilding ties in directly with the development of some great characters and villains. This book finally gives us some more adequate explanations regarding the magic system as well, which was much needed, and it is actually extremely interesting and even more creative than I remember (I read this book a LONG time ago). We get to know people from all different regions of this world, ranging from the mysterious Aes Sedai, the Whitecloaks, the Seanchan, and a whole number of people from different cities and cultures all over. It was actually very impressive to read, because many fantasy books fall into the trap of having only one singular culture, with only slight variances. And that one culture is usually the typical medieval Lords and Ladies kind of thing. Our characters made some really good progress in this book, as well. The main protagonist, Rand, accelerated a lot in this book compared to book one. I hesitate to say more than that to avoid spoilers for people who are considering the series, but Jordan did a great job of making these characters each into their own people. They feel much more real to me now, which is always a good sign. "Let tears flow, O ye people of the world. Weep for your salvation." In Conclusion: I didn't realize how much I loved this book until I started writing the review. Originally I was going to go for 4.5 stars, but genuinely, this book had very few failings that I could even think of or point out adequately. And the one or two things I could mention didn't actually impact my experience or enjoyment of the book at all. Jordan proves himself to be a master of the genre in this book. I hear from a lot of people that it tapers off by book four, but I'm still going to enjoy it for what it is, and I can say honestly that this is one of the best books I've read this year. Definitely check these books out if you don't mind the hefty commitment and you're looking for a truly epic story that doesn't require an encyclopedia to figure out *coughcoughMALAZANcoughcough* ;]. Happy reading =].

  11. 4 out of 5

    Argona

    What a book! What an amazing journey! Such an epic ending!*Takes calming breaths* I loved this book even more than the first one in the series! “The Great hunt” begins exactly where “The Eye of the World” left off. So much happens in this second book! I was locked in suspense for the entirety of this novel, especially at the end. New forces with monstrous creatures and terrible weapons emerge out of seemingly nowhere and shake the foundation of nations. New threats are added to the old ones. The Da What a book! What an amazing journey! Such an epic ending!*Takes calming breaths* I loved this book even more than the first one in the series! “The Great hunt” begins exactly where “The Eye of the World” left off. So much happens in this second book! I was locked in suspense for the entirety of this novel, especially at the end. New forces with monstrous creatures and terrible weapons emerge out of seemingly nowhere and shake the foundation of nations. New threats are added to the old ones. The Darkfriends are everywhere, from nobles of many different nations to Children of the Light and even the Aes Sedai! Aielmen finally make an appearance! We get to learn more about the Ogier race, their steddings and their traditions. Daes dae'mar, the Great Game, played by the noble houses of Cairhien is introduced. And much more! This is one amazing Epic fantasy. A journey into a well-thought universe with a very complex and intriguing magic system and compelling characters that come from many different nations and races. A must-read for fantasy fans! The length of these books no longer intimidate me. I can’t wait to read the next book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    This picked up right after the end happenings of The Eye of the World. Rand and his group of friends have found the legendary Horn of Valere. Unfortunately it is quickly stolen by Darkfriends. It must be found before the Last Battle with the Dark One! The story started a little slow but definitely got more and more engaging as it progressed. Rand, Mat, and Perrin were on the quest for the Horn and I thought their journey was an interesting one. Egwene and Nynaeve started the Aes Sadai training a This picked up right after the end happenings of The Eye of the World. Rand and his group of friends have found the legendary Horn of Valere. Unfortunately it is quickly stolen by Darkfriends. It must be found before the Last Battle with the Dark One! The story started a little slow but definitely got more and more engaging as it progressed. Rand, Mat, and Perrin were on the quest for the Horn and I thought their journey was an interesting one. Egwene and Nynaeve started the Aes Sadai training at Tar Valon and were joined there by Elayne and Min. I enjoyed learning more about the Aes Sedai. Jordan's world building continues to be excellent and it was good to see and learn more of the kingdoms. The addition of the Seanchan invasion force and their crazy ways also gave the story a whole new dimension. The end happenings were quite dramatic so I'm looking forward to see where the story goes in the third instalment. Rating: 4 stars. Audio Note: Kate Reading and Michael Kramer do as good a job with this one as they did with the first book in the series.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Connor

    This is such a step up from the first. I feel like quite a lot of plot lines started moving in this, and I’m pumped to see where things start going. This seemed a bit like a filler where we learn a lot more about the world, but not a huge amount happens for the length of the novel. Regardless, I was engaged throughout it and am excited to continue now.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Evgeny

    The second book in the series, some people complain there are some influences of J.R.R. Tolkien in the first book; this book is where Robert Jordan found his own voice. For the first time in centuries The Great Hunt is called; its purpose is to find the legendary Horn of Valere which calls the greatest heroes of all times to the battle yet again. Countless number of people wander around looking for it. Rand and company know exactly where the Horn is, but they might have trouble reaching it. It d The second book in the series, some people complain there are some influences of J.R.R. Tolkien in the first book; this book is where Robert Jordan found his own voice. For the first time in centuries The Great Hunt is called; its purpose is to find the legendary Horn of Valere which calls the greatest heroes of all times to the battle yet again. Countless number of people wander around looking for it. Rand and company know exactly where the Horn is, but they might have trouble reaching it. It does not help any that there is a prophesy - coming from the bad guys, no less - which talks about the Daughter of the Night (think female Darth Vader) being set loose upon the world again. What really stood out during my reread is the development of Rand as the character; Mat and Perrin take backseat to this, but Rand is fascinating. The majority of the book is spent on his POV and his struggle to remain independent and to reject the leadership role thrust upon him; unfortunately he has little or no choice in the matter. I also realized I like Nynaeve and have great respect for her. Yes, I said this. She was the most annoying character during my first read, but now I know how she will develop. Without giving any spoilers, she will be the only Aes Sedai who never tries to manipulate anybody - she bullies some of the people instead. Egwene gets some much-needed lessons in humility which unfortunately will be lost upon her in the future books. This is the last book where Elayne and Gawin behave like normal human beings, and not people with some (sometimes severe) mental deficiency. These two as well as their mother and half-brother are among the worst good guys in fantasy. In the conclusion this book is worth 5 very solid stars. The first 5 or 6 books are a must read for any fantasy fans; even if you do not like it you have to see what all the fuss about the series is about. I also noticed something during my first reading as well as reread: the length of the books seems daunting in the beginning, but by the middle of each book it is really hard to put them down as they really pull you in their world. You owe it to yourself to check the series.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Well, if the first book in this series diminished somewhat outside the cozy light of memory, this second book absolutely withers away. The plot is listless, its tension flagging between points that are only interesting by comparison. And the characters refuse to evolve. That is, they are all still hung up on the same issues they had at the beginning of the first book, even though they've been through fairly earth-shattering experiences in the intervening pages. I mean, why is Nynaeve still schem Well, if the first book in this series diminished somewhat outside the cozy light of memory, this second book absolutely withers away. The plot is listless, its tension flagging between points that are only interesting by comparison. And the characters refuse to evolve. That is, they are all still hung up on the same issues they had at the beginning of the first book, even though they've been through fairly earth-shattering experiences in the intervening pages. I mean, why is Nynaeve still scheming on destroying Moiraine, even after the latter's motives in taking the people from Emond's Field have been thoroughly and comprehensively vindicated again and again? Plus, and this is the big one, why does Robert Jordan insist on having his male and female characters interact in a manner so superficial, so polar, and so painful that it reminds one of bad 1950s television? The whole, Men don't understand women, women don't understand men except in so far as they want to control them. And the rampant use of this trope: "Rand blushed and wished Perrin was there; he always knew how to deal with women, way more than Rand ever would." followed, sometimes only a couple pages later, by "Perrin wished Rand was there. He knew how to deal with girls." I mean, is he serious? This same gag is used at least seven (7) times in the first two books of this series. It should also be pointed out that these "characters" are 17 years old. So anyway, I'm done with these.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Edward Lorn

    I almost made it to page 300 before I realized I wasn't enjoying myself, and that the book as a whole was making me angrier and angrier the farther into it I got. I'd started skimming a 10-page chapter and said to myself, Why the fuck are you still reading this? So I'm done. Before I invest another minute into this rambling-ass of a novel, I'm tapping out. In summation: I don't care about anyone in this book. I gives not a fuck for the story. I can't believe I made it as far as I did because thi I almost made it to page 300 before I realized I wasn't enjoying myself, and that the book as a whole was making me angrier and angrier the farther into it I got. I'd started skimming a 10-page chapter and said to myself, Why the fuck are you still reading this? So I'm done. Before I invest another minute into this rambling-ass of a novel, I'm tapping out. In summation: I don't care about anyone in this book. I gives not a fuck for the story. I can't believe I made it as far as I did because this book is everything I hate about the fantasy genre concentrated into a miasma of generic fuckery. 12 more books? You can just go right ahead and eat the entirety of my ass. TRANSLATION: Oh hells naw. Final Judgment: Basic bitch status confirmed.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Vagner Stefanello

    Review in Portuguese from Desbravando Livros: Contém alguns spoilers do livro anterior. E não é que tudo pode mudar de um livro para outro? Eu não tinha gostado muito de O Olho do Mundo, mas A Grande Caçada superou muito as expectativas. Li essa sequência por insistência de muitos amigos leitores e também por ter percebido, na obra anterior, que a série do Jordan tinha um bom futuro, mesmo que no 1º livro tudo tenha sido feito de um modo que eu acabei não gostando tanto, cheio de passagens que que Review in Portuguese from Desbravando Livros: Contém alguns spoilers do livro anterior. E não é que tudo pode mudar de um livro para outro? Eu não tinha gostado muito de O Olho do Mundo, mas A Grande Caçada superou muito as expectativas. Li essa sequência por insistência de muitos amigos leitores e também por ter percebido, na obra anterior, que a série do Jordan tinha um bom futuro, mesmo que no 1º livro tudo tenha sido feito de um modo que eu acabei não gostando tanto, cheio de passagens que quebravam totalmente o ritmo. Doce ilusão ou obra do Tenebroso fazer eu achar que sua sequência seria parecida. Passados os fatos no Olho do Mundo e seus desdobramentos, sabemos que o grupo de personagens principais encontra-se em Fal Dara e está em posse da Trombeta de Valere, que muitos dizem ser um artefato capaz de convocar os heróis do passado para lutar ao lado do tocador da Trombeta. Já comecei o livro pensando: Agora que a parte boa de ação já passou, será que teremos páginas intermináveis de descrições e explicações de tempos longínquos? Engano meu. As informações passadas ao leitor são intrigantes, cheias de duplo sentido e que me fizeram querer saber sempre mais, ao mesmo tempo que a leitura não se tornava enfadonha e chata em momento algum. Ainda mais com o prólogo se passando em uma reunião do Tenebroso com dezenas de Amigos das Trevas, onde todos parecem estar prontos para colocar em prática um plano que pode atrapalhar e muito a vida dos nossos conhecidos heróis Rand, Mat, Perrin, Egwene, Nynaeve e cia. — “O túmulo não é limite para o meu chamado” — traduziu, em uma voz tão baixa que parecia estar falando sozinha. — A Trombeta de Valere, criada para convocar heróis de volta do túmulo. E a profecia diz que ela só seria encontrada às vésperas da Última Batalha. Acomodados em Fal Dara, nossos protagonistas estão pensando apenas no futuro imediato. Egwene e Nynaeve dirigem-se a Tar Valon para iniciar seu treinamento como Aes Sedai. Mat precisará de ajuda para se livrar da maldição da adaga que possui, e as Sedai parecem ser a única solução. Perrin pensa em voltar para Campo de Emond, em Dois Rios, e viver tranquilamente por lá, mas sua relação com os Lobos parece ter se tornado muito mais forte. Já Rand quer apenas fugir do seu destino: enlouquecer e acabar com a vida daqueles que ama. Essa é a mácula que o Dragão carrega, e Rand está muito disposto a não deixá-la acontecer. Só tem um probleminha: a bendita Trombeta foi roubada, juntamente com a adaga amaldiçoada de Mat! E deixá-los nas mãos dos Amigos das Trevas não parece ser uma boa ideia. Portanto, lá vamos nós acompanhar mais uma aventura. Rand, Mat e Perrin seguem com Lorde Ingtar e uma comitiva formada por shienaranos em busca do artefato mágico e da adaga, enquanto ao mesmo tempo Egwene e Nynaeve começam sua caminhada rumo a Tar Valon. Usando e abusando dos recursos apresentados no livro anterior, Robert Jordan nos faz praticamente atravessar boa parte do mundo por meio das Pedras-Portais e também dos Caminhos, passagens mágicas que alteram a distância e tempo percorridos. Uma das boas partes desse livro é conhecer Tar Valon e como são treinadas as Noviças e Aceitas que pretendem se tornar Aes Sedai um dia. Egwene e Nynaeve certamente passarão alguns sufocos em busca do sonho, ainda mais quando percebem o que acontece quando uma Aes Sedai "amansa" um homem capaz de canalizar o Poder Único, como é o caso do Falso Dragão Logain. E se algum dia, em seu lugar, estiver Rand? Elas serão capazes de fazer o que lhes é mandado? São perguntas que só serão respondidas quando eu ler o restante da série. Destaco também, antes que eu esqueça de mencionar, as novas amizades das duas garotas: Elayne e Min. E quem disse que não teríamos novos povos e criaturas sendo apresentados? É nesse livro que Jordan expande ainda mais o seu universo e nos apresenta seres muito peculiares, como os Seanchan, que saíram de além do Oceano para recuperar as terras do passado, falando sobre o tal Corenne, reforçando que devem o terreno pronto para o retorno dos exércitos que esperarão a vinda do seu herói Artur Asa-de-gavião. Acompanhados deles, criaturas bonitinhas e dóceis, como os grolms. Isso que nem comentei o que esse povo pensa e faz com as Aes Sedai ou mulheres capazes de canalizar o Poder Único. Algo repudiante e covarde, diga-se de passagem. Deixarei a cargo do leitor descobrir o que acontece e tirar as suas próprias conclusões a respeito. Conhecemos também, em Cairhien, o famoso Daes Dae'mar, o Grande Jogo ou Jogo das Casas, muito parecido com o que temos na série As Crônicas de Gelo e Fogo, escrita por George Martin, onde cada movimento, certo ou errado, pode representar uma ameaça para um lorde vizinho e acabar trazendo grandes consequências. Finalmente consigo perceber o que Jordan quis trazer para o leitor ao escrever A Roda do Tempo. Mesclando conflitos pessoais (principalmente os de Rand, Perrin e Nynaeve nesse livro) com uma infinidade incrível de povos e culturas diferentes, a escala começa a crescer e eu me sinto mais inserido dentro da trama, querendo aprender mais e saber qual será o destino de cada um. — Alguns homens — começou ela, sem tirar os olhos da mão dele — escolhem buscar a grandeza, ao passo que outros são forçados a ela. É sempre melhor escolher do que ser forçado. Um homem que é forçado nunca é inteiramente senhor de si, precisa dançar de acordo com os cordéis de quem o forçou. E o final desse livro? SENSACIONAL! Feito com muita qualidade, já adianto, e fechando com chave de ouro essa sequência de O Olho do Mundo. Toda aquela aura de mistério por trás da Trombeta de Valere é revelada, trazendo consigo muito mais que uma simples melodia. Deixe que o Dragão cavalgue novamente nos ventos do tempo.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Choko

    *** 5 *** This book and this series never Ever disappoints! It is magical, bewitching, enthralling, intricate, thought and emotion inducing, addiction promoting, and all together superior to almost any other series I have ever read... !!! Yep, this is the reason I can not write a review on any of the books in this series. I get into it and then I turn into an absolute and total fan-girl and only superlatives of wonderfulness jump from my brain... It is not that I think the book is perfect (ooo, *** 5 *** This book and this series never Ever disappoints! It is magical, bewitching, enthralling, intricate, thought and emotion inducing, addiction promoting, and all together superior to almost any other series I have ever read... !!! Yep, this is the reason I can not write a review on any of the books in this series. I get into it and then I turn into an absolute and total fan-girl and only superlatives of wonderfulness jump from my brain... It is not that I think the book is perfect (ooo, that was very difficult to type!). No. I know that it was written by a human thus imperfection is a given, but boy is it close to what my soul acknowledges as close to perfection. As a second book in a 15 book series it is supposed to be a set-up, just world building and introduction to the conflict, right? But it is soooooo much more! It is all that, done in the most engaging way possible, plus everything else a good Fantasy book can deliver. Tears, fighting, laughter, angst, battles, politics, intrigues, Game of Houses, Good and Evil, quite a lot of gray, simple village youths finding their way to glory and responsibility, religion, magic, war.... All the spectrum of feelings, from good to bad, from joy to frustration, from excitement to depression... Put it all together in a masterfully balanced plot with a "weave" of prose that transports you as far away from reality as we can possibly get, and you have this marvelous universe of Robert Jordan's creation...! I do it an injustice with my poor ability to convey its majestic greatness... Thus, the only thing left for all of you out there who have not as of yet read this series is obvious - get it and read it! You will not be sorry:-) I wish all of you Happy reading and may every book you read be what you need!!!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    Objectively for me (which I realize is a contradictory statement), this is a three star book. It has some major problems. But . . . I just can’t resist the siren call of an immersive fantasy world, and unlike the first book in the series, which failed to capture my imagination, this one did. So I’m giving it the fourth star, for the potential I see in the series, and for giving me that good old fantasy world buzz. First, the good stuff, the most notable thing being that this book actually felt li Objectively for me (which I realize is a contradictory statement), this is a three star book. It has some major problems. But . . . I just can’t resist the siren call of an immersive fantasy world, and unlike the first book in the series, which failed to capture my imagination, this one did. So I’m giving it the fourth star, for the potential I see in the series, and for giving me that good old fantasy world buzz. First, the good stuff, the most notable thing being that this book actually felt like it’s own thing, as opposed to The Eye of the World, which really felt like Jordan was stealing everything he thought he could possibly get away with from The Lord of the Rings. Rand al’Thor knows he is the Dragon Reborn, or rather, I should say, people have told him that he’s the Dragon Reborn, the dude who’s prophesied to save the world from the dark one in the last battle, but he’s resisting his fate with everything in his power, to the point of idiocy. All the while he’s resisting the urge to channel the one power, which will eventually make him go mad, he’s all But I’m just a shepherd! While he’s fighting this internal battle with himself, his outward life has changed beyond all recognition, and Moiraine, the Aes Sedai that brought him and his friends out of their home town and saved their lives last book, is determined to see him on his proper path, whether he likes it or not, going so far as to have all his peasant clothes burned, and supplying him with new ones fit for a lord. The whole book everyone around him thinks he’s a lord, and treats him like one, which causes a rift in his friendship with boyhood pals Mat and Perrin. Of course, Rand himself is also partially responsible for the rift because he’s an idiot, but more on that later. So with all that going on, the Horn of Valere, which they found in the Eye of the World at the end of the last book, has been stolen by Darkfriends, and their old frenemy Padan Fain (possessed by that evil a-hole Mordeth) has escaped from Shienar custody. So Rand, Perrin, and Mat, along with soldiers from Shienar, set out to get the horn back from Fain and the Darkfriends before they blow it themselves. The spirits the horn supposedly summons will fight for whoever sounds it, good or evil, and its imperative that the horn be secured on the side of light. Egwene and Nynaeve head in the opposite direction to be trained as Aes Sedai. Also, the armies of Artur Hawkwing seem to have returned from across the sea after a hundred years away and are causing all kinds of trouble. In a lot of ways, the actual events of the plot aren’t as important as the development the characters are going through, which is nice. Unfortunately, the book suffers in the character department as much as it succeeds. Rand’s overall arc of accepting his identity as the Dragon Reborn is a good one, but the scene by scene minutiae of it gets tiring because he is so frustratingly dumb about so many things. He does that thing I hate where he pushes his friends away with mean words “to protect them,” which is dumb enough to begin with, but then he spends almost the rest of the novel being butthurt that they’re mad at him for thinking he’s better than they are. He refuses to trust people (mostly Aes Sedai, and Moiraine specifically) who have proven themselves trustworthy. He doesn’t take the million hints he gets, including dreams from the enemy himself, and literally everyone telling him he’s an Aielman, or whatever else, of his new identity. He can’t even manage to spot a villain in his midst who is more than obviously trying to sway him to evil because she’s so pretty, even though everything she says and does screams out EVIL CHICK. Ironically, he trusts her immediately when she has nothing but harm in mind for him, but he won’t trust Moiraine at all, who has done nothing but help him and save his life. A lot of this is Jordan’s writing, I think, that’s the problem. He’s not great at subtlety. The idea of Selene is a good one, but if he wanted to make her a true honeypot, she shouldn’t have been so damn obvious about it! She’s known Rand for about ten minutes before she starts yammering on and on about him reaching for greatness, and oh why don’t you go this way, and oh why don’t you take the Horn? And when he doesn’t do what she wants she throws a temper tantrum and wanders off. Anyone with half a brain would have thought, gee, why is this random INCREDIBLY BEAUTIFUL woman so interested in me? He’s so adamant about being a shepherd, if he really thought he was, why would she care about him? The only way she would is if he was all the things he so very much resists being. It’s so frustrating. Pretty much all of the characters have their stupid moments, but especially Rand and Nynaeve, who seems to think Moiraine ruined her life and all her friends’ lives, with no basis in evidence for it at all. In fact, the exact opposite. If it weren’t for Moiraine, realistically, they’d probably all be long dead. I was feeling a little down on this book closer to the end as the characters kept being stupid, but the last fifty pages or so are pretty awesome, and I couldn’t help but enjoy myself while reading them. Here’s hoping we won’t have to deal with Rand being whiny about not being the Dragon and how HE WON'T BE USED anymore. Will hopefully pick up book three next month. [3.5 stars, rounded up]

  20. 5 out of 5

    Wanda

    My second step on the Wheel of Time! The best part about it was that it got me feeling things about these characters. I mean, I wanted to bash heads together with Rand being all stubborn and Mat not helping himself a bit and Perrin not accepting who he has become! And despite that, I realize that these would be hard realizations to come to—they aren’t just country lads anymore. Plus, Nyaneve irritated me every bit as much as I appreciated her. The echoes of the King Arthur story are strong—Galad My second step on the Wheel of Time! The best part about it was that it got me feeling things about these characters. I mean, I wanted to bash heads together with Rand being all stubborn and Mat not helping himself a bit and Perrin not accepting who he has become! And despite that, I realize that these would be hard realizations to come to—they aren’t just country lads anymore. Plus, Nyaneve irritated me every bit as much as I appreciated her. The echoes of the King Arthur story are strong—Galad, Gawyn, and Elayne have been added to the cast. And there was a reference to a sword in a stone that only the Dragon Reborn could use. References to the legendary warrior Arthur, who is born again in the Dragon—like Arthur Pendragon, who is said to be asleep and ready to return to the world if he is needed. The Horn of Valere and its ability to summon warriors of the past reminded me of Tolkien’s Paths of the Dead. It felt to me like this was being used up awfully early in the course of the WoT—after all, this is only volume 2 of 14! There are obviously many unanswered questions and I shall look forward to reading The Dragon Reborn as soon as possible. (One of the advantages of getting a late start on this series is that they are all available now.) Book 270 of my Science Fiction and Fantasy reading project.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Niki Hawkes - The Obsessive Bookseller

    3.5 stars

  22. 5 out of 5

    Hasham Rasool

    "The Wheel of Time turns, and Ages come and pass, leaving memories that become legend. Legend fades to myth and even myth is long forgotten when the Age that gave it birth returns again. What was, what will be, and what is, may yet fall under the Shadow." I feel great to come back reading 'The Wheel of Time'. I love this book so much Alhamdulillah! I am hooking in 'The Wheel of Time'. I think it might will take me a long time to complete this series.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dino-Jess ✮ The Book Eating Dinosaur ✮

    This was a wonderful installment in what I can already see is going to become one of my favourite series of all time. I had a much better experience with this one than the first book; I only read seven other books in the time it took me to get through this, compared with the twenty-six I went through in my adventure to get through the first book. No spoilers – because I know a bunch of you are yet to experience the wonder of this and I don’t want to ruin anything for you. Character run down: Rand This was a wonderful installment in what I can already see is going to become one of my favourite series of all time. I had a much better experience with this one than the first book; I only read seven other books in the time it took me to get through this, compared with the twenty-six I went through in my adventure to get through the first book. No spoilers – because I know a bunch of you are yet to experience the wonder of this and I don’t want to ruin anything for you. Character run down: Rand – Is such a ladies man. I love it. He’s adorable. And he wasn't as much of an idiot this time around. Except when he was thinking about Egwene. Stop thinking about Egwene please. Nynaeve – IS THE BEST IN THE WHOLE WIDE WORLD . She is one of the strongest, best and most amazing female characters I have ever read. I love her SO MUCH. Badass sassypants to the rescue. Min – Yas. I love dis bitch. Elayne – I think I know what your future holds and I am super excited to see if I am right. Egwene – Is still THE WORST and needs to die. But Selene is pretty stiff competition for most loathed character now. Selene – I don’t like you, I don’t trust you. I saw you for who you really were a mile off, I just hope Rand will open his eyes and see it too. Moraine – I wonder what strings you have been pulling? Lan – I miss you, my warrior swordsman. The ensemble cast had some wonderful new additions this time around and I can’t wait to dive into the next book as I continue on my quest to demolish this series by the end of next year. This was a heartbreaking journey. I had to put this down three separate times, because I was bawling my eyes out. I can’t believe the level of connection I feel to these characters. The social commentary in this is often hilarious and spot on, and I have to say I really enjoy the way women are represented in this series. No shrinking violets here. Women know what they want and will fight to get it and keep it. And they drop so many truth bombs, its fantastic! My one complaint is that there were a few times that characters were introduced and it seemed like I was just supposed to know who they were… But I didn't actually know who they were (without consulting the glossary) and so some scenes didn't pack quite the punch that I am sure they were intended to. The Wheel weaves as the Wheel wills. I am a part of the pattern and look forward to continuing the journey of this series. 4 i-sure-wish-Lan-would-give-me-a-ring Stars Also posted over at my blog: The Book Eating Dinosaur.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kaila

    The tone of the series really changes with this second installment. It goes from following a few country bumpkins on their first wide-eyed adventure into the world, to what we know and love the Wheel of Time for - a sprawling epic covering an entire continent. From the prologue, we're suddenly bombarded with the styles and personalities of all the diverse regions of the land, and though it will be hammered home so we always know what Jordan is talking about, we're also expected to start remember The tone of the series really changes with this second installment. It goes from following a few country bumpkins on their first wide-eyed adventure into the world, to what we know and love the Wheel of Time for - a sprawling epic covering an entire continent. From the prologue, we're suddenly bombarded with the styles and personalities of all the diverse regions of the land, and though it will be hammered home so we always know what Jordan is talking about, we're also expected to start remembering all the crazy threads he is beginning to weave for us. This is also where a number of phrases that Jordan uses ad nauseam really pick up. See the Wheel of Time drinking game for more info - beware spoilers! Braid tugging, skirt smoothing, wool heads, boxed ears, and sword stances (such as "Heron Wading in the Rushes") make me constantly roll my eyes. I got into the habit of shouting out the stances whenever they occurred to my begrudgingly tolerating boyfriend. "Cat Crosses the Courtyard!" I shout across the room. "The Swallow Takes Flight!" I'm amazed at the wide variety Jordan came up with; I don't know if one is ever repeated. I thought it pretty ridiculous that anytime the Heron marked blade came out, so did the fighting stances. For me though, this endears the series to me. All the things that are repeated over and over again can either annoy you or bind you closer to the story, it's really up to the reader. I chose to let them make me laugh every time they're mentioned. Once again we're traveling across the face of the world, but instead of being chased, our young heroes are the chasers. The stakes are high and they never back down, although many readers will find the middle slow moving. There's a lot of information being given that doesn't come into play right away. The climax of The Great Hunt, however, is shiver inducing, as all the story lines come together for one great release of tension. The Great Hunt is really just a warm up for the pure awesomeness that is books 3-6, but if you're uninterested in keeping the stories and vast cast of characters straight (and I don't blame you), this is where I suggest stopping. For myself however, I'm remembering why I fell in love with fantasy in the first place. The Great Hunt became harder and harder to put down with every chapter that I finished, and it took all my willpower to not run immediately to my bookshelf and pick up book 3, The Dragon Reborn. I can hardly wait to read more!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    I think this series, so far, is presenting me with the hardest time I've ever had writing my reviews. I want to talk, and all that seems to be ready to come out is: "OMG! IT'S AMAZING!!!! READ IT NOW!!!!! I CAN'T STOP!!!!!! I resorted to bullet points in my last review, and I'm not even sure that can help this time. So bear with me while I spew out whatever I can manage to get out. If you haven't started this series, just go to my review of The Eye of the World and GO START THIS AMAZING SERIES. Th I think this series, so far, is presenting me with the hardest time I've ever had writing my reviews. I want to talk, and all that seems to be ready to come out is: "OMG! IT'S AMAZING!!!! READ IT NOW!!!!! I CAN'T STOP!!!!!! I resorted to bullet points in my last review, and I'm not even sure that can help this time. So bear with me while I spew out whatever I can manage to get out. If you haven't started this series, just go to my review of The Eye of the World and GO START THIS AMAZING SERIES. The Great Hunt picks up right where The Eye of the World left off, and very quickly ups all the antes. Even more so than the first book, I was locked in suspense for the entirety of this novel. I hated having to put it down, because I worried about everyone. Would they be hurt? How would they be changed? What was going to happen? There's too many people in danger! Gah! Help! It definitely wasn't an easy read, I was incredibly stressed while reading, but it made for one hell of an amazing roller-coaster of a ride. The Horn of Valere is one of the most important things that needs to be found prior to the Last Battle. It recalls the heroes of legends to fight - for whomever sounds it, good or evil. Ever since the horn was first mentioned in The Eye of the World, I've been waiting to see what would happen with it. I hoped that it'd be our heroes that found it, sounded it, and couldn't wait to see the heroes of legend return. After hearing so much about them, from so many different sources, to say I was excited would be a gross understatement. All of my favorite characters from the last book are here and we get to know them so much better. Plus, there are new characters that are given more time and more depth. Some we'd met briefly in the pages of The Eye of the World - like Bayle Domon - others, we hadn't yet met at all - Ingtar was a particular favorite of mine in this book. None of them has an easy path. Obstacles, despair, trickery, and the Pattern itself throws them all into disarray and sometimes complete confusion. I still love Rand, even if I want to occasionally smack him and make him take three-seconds to actually listen. Two Rivers stubbornness, in truth. Mat's growing on me. Especially at the end, I think I might end up loving him. Perrin....well, I think when he truly accepts himself, that's going to be something to see. I can't wait for that moment. I absolutely LOVE Lan, and he's not in this enough - though when he is, they're awesome and impressive moments, that sometimes broke my heart. And Nynaeve. I love her. She's absolutely amazing. Strong and determined, stubborn and smart. I even grew to appreciate Egwene a bit more. She ... scared me at one point, and might have had one of my favorite lines in the book. And Min, I'd hate to have her ability, but I love her to death. I'm so glad we got more of her here. Lanfear scares the shit out of me. She's not only one of the Forsaken, incredibly powerful, and crazy, she thinks that Lews Therin - her lover before he married - is hers. No matter the incarnation. You can imagine how this might be bad for certain other characters I love. It's not only that she lays a claim on him, it's that she so obviously doesn't even know the man she claims. I don't think she knew Lews Therin, probably why they never made it, and she definitely doesn't know his reincarnation now. If she did, she wouldn't go about her machinations in the way she does. There's the Children, who I think I will always hate. Their superiority and self-righteousness is impossible. Not only do they punish people who have no reason to be punished, but they then decide that the 'sins of the father' be visited TEN generations down, and the 'sins of the mother' SEVEN generations down. Are you freaking kidding me? Actual children are guilty of things they know nothing about? You choose to be bigoted assholes. Maybe you should look for actual Darkfriends instead of accusing innocent people, or people that you just don't understand. Ugh. I hate you. I hope you all die. But the real threat in this book, besides the Dark One himself, is the Seanchan. They arrive from seemingly nowhere to demand obedience and punish those who didn't wait for them - over hundreds of years - to return. This might not seem too bad, but add in the fact that they ride enormous bear-like creatures, with scales, three-eyes, and sharp, hooked beaks. Then add in that they're big fans of slavery. Not only of their servants (who'd rather kill themselves than live without their masters), but of wielders of the One Power. I think that's the thing that scared me the most. They chained and control women who should be Aes Sedai. I can't even deal with that kind of insanity. And the way they control them? I just can't. I haven't even mentioned all the threats, there's still the Trollocs, and Myrddraal. And the various Darkfriends - which are in every aspect of this world, infiltrating some of the most unexpected places, which is scary as hell. There's the threat of the Black Ajah - an Aes Sedai that serves the Dark One. I know, WTF? The guy that I won't even name, because he might scare me a little more than the Dark One does. All of these things, all of these worries, all of these threats...and I was nearly having a coronary while reading. Right up through the ending my eyes were wide with wonder. I'll be starting the next one, soon. Very, very soon. I know I've got twelve books left, and there's a lot that can happen to everyone I love. I'm still worried, truth be told. There's a lot at stake, and they're right in the middle of it. Ta'veren. Pulling me in. My Own Notes (Spoilers abound, don't read unless you've read the book - it'll just spoil you (for this book and previous books)) (view spoiler)[ Things That Seem Important 1. 1% And it shall come to pass that what men made shall be shattered, and the Shadow shall lie across the Pattern of the Age, and the Dark One shall once more lay his hand upon the world of man. Women shall weep and men quail as the nations of the earth are rent like rotting cloth. Neither shall anything stand nor abide... Yet one shall be born to face the Shadow, born once more as he was born before and shall be born again, time without end. The Dragon shall be reborn, and there shall be wailing and gnashing of teeth at his rebirth. In sackcloth and ashes shall he clothe the people, and he shall break the world again by his coming, tearing apart all ties that bind. Like the unfettered dawn shall he blind us, and burn us, yet shall the Dragon Reborn confront the Shadow at the Last Battle, and his blood shall give us the Light. Let tears flow, O ye people of the world. Weep for your salvation. Holy. Shit. 2. 17% "Daughter of the Night, she walks again. The ancient war, she yet fights. Her new lover she seeks, who shall serve her and die, yet serve still. Who shall stand against her coming? The Shining Walls shall kneel. Blood feeds blood. Blood calls blood. Blood is, and blood was, and blood shall ever be. The man who channels stands alone. He gives his friends for sacrifice. Two roads before him, one to death beyond dying, one to life eternal. Which will he choose? Which will he choose? What hand shelters? What hand slays? Blood feeds blood. Blood calls blood. Blood is, and blood was, and blood shall ever be. Luc came to the Mountains of Dhoom. Isam waited in the high passes. The hunt is now begun. The Shadow's hounds now course, and kill. One did live, and one did die, but both are. The Time of Change has come. Blood feeds blood. Blood calls blood. Blood is, and blood was, and blood shall ever be. The Watchers wait on Toman's Head. The seed of the Hammer burns the ancient tree. Death shall sow, and summer burn, before the Great Lord comes. Death shall reap, and bodies fail, before the Great Lord comes. Again the seed slays ancient wrong, before the Great Lord comes. Now the Great Lord comes. Now the Great Lord comes. Blood feeds blood. Blood calls blood. Blood is, and blood was, and blood shall ever be. Now the Great Lord comes." * "Daughter of the Night" = Lanfear.... O______O * "her new lover" = She was Lews Therin Telamon's lover previously, so is she searching for Rand? * "Shining Walls" = Tar Valon? * Rand will stand alone - and SACRIFICE HIS FRIENDS?! O_O * Two roads - to serve the Dark One, or not? * Shelters and slays??? * Luc - I knew there was going to be something coming up about him and Tigraine disappearing and not being KNOWN to be dead. * Isam - Moiraine later: I must keep this from him, until I know how he will react. - I could hate her for that alone. From Lan? Ugh. * "One did live, and one did die." ?? * "Watchers" = Do Miere A'vron, Watchers Over the Waves, for Artur Hawkwing's armies that went across the sea * "Seed of the Hammer" - Artur Hawkwing was known as Hammer of Light. * "Again the seed slays ancient wrong..." Hmm... 3. 26% A small, age-dark ivory carving of am an holding a sword. The fellow who sold it claimed if you held it long enough you started to feel warm. Like the sa'angreal that Moiraine has? 3. 53% (Elayne speaking): "She said I'd have to share my husband with two other women, and I'd never put up with that. She just laughs, and says it was never her idea of how to run things, either." ...(Egwene) "What do you see when you look at me?" "A white flame, and ... Oh, all sorts of things. I don't know what it means." "She says that a great deal," Elayne said dryly. "One of the other things she said she saw looking at me was a severed hand. Not mine, she says..." 4. 56% "Twice and twice shall he be marked, twice to live, and twice to die. Once the heron, to set his path. Twice the heron, to name him true. Once the Dragon, for remembrance lost. Twice the Dragon, for the price he must pay." ... "Twice dawns the day when his blood is shed. Once for mourning, once for birth. Red on black, the Dragon's blood stains the rock of Shayol Ghul. In the Pit of Doom shall his blood free men from the Shadow." Gah! *bites nails* 5. 66% "What is it?" Rand asked. "A sa'angreal." She sounded as if it were really not very important, but Perrin suddenly had the feeling the two of them had entered a private conversation, saying things no one else could hear. "One of a pair, the two largest ever made, that we know of. And an odd pair, as well. One, still buried on Tremalking, can only be used by a woman. This one can only be used by a man. They were made during the War of the Powers, to be a weapon...Together, they might well be powerful enough to Break the World again, perhaps even worse than the first Breaking." ..."Oh, there is no need for [warning them what they're digging up], I think. The two must be used in unison to handle enough of the One Power to Break the World--that was the way in the Age of Legends; a man and a woman working together were always ten times as strong as they were apart--and what Aes Sedai today would aid a man in channeling?...I can think of few women strong enough to survive the flow...The Amyrlin, of course, Moiraine, and Elaida...Perhaps one or two others. And three still in training...." 6. 82% "As for the mind that first thought of the a'dam, it was the mind of a woman who called herself Aes Sedai.... ...a woman named Deain, who thought she could do better serving the Emperor--he was not Emperor then, of course--since he had no Aes Sedai in his armies, came to him with a device she had made, the first a'dam, fastened to the neck of one of her sisters. Though that woman did not want to serve Luthair, the a'dam required her to serve. Deain made more a'dam, the first sul'dam were found, and women captured who called themselves Aes Sedai discovered that they were in fact only marath'damane, Those Who Must Be Leashed. It is said that when she herself was leashed, Deain's screams shook the Tower of Midnight, but of course she, too, was a marah'damane, and marath'damane cannot be allowed to run free." Oh.My.God. 7. 86% There was danger, but that was to be expected--and new things, too, among the images she had seen before; it was like that sometimes. A man's ring of heavy gold floated above Nynaeve's head, and above Elayne's a red-hot iron and an axe. They meant trouble, she was sure, but ti seemed distant, somewhere in the future. I know what the ring means, but what could the "red-hot iron and axe" mean? Something to do with Perrin? Does this tie into her having to share her husband? 8. 95% "What if I told her there's another woman yet to come, one she doesn't even know?" WHO?! Quotes and Moments I Love 1. 4% "Love is an odd thing." Lan sounded suddenly weary. "As odd a thing as there is. 2. 7% He refused to give up, though. There were those who said Two Rivers folk could teach stones and give lessons to mules. When there was nothing else left, Two Rivers people hung on to their stubbornness. 3. 17% "Oh, they're not angry, exactly. Though most of them think you need a strong hand to settle you down some. Fascinated is more like it. Even the Lady Amalisa can't stop asking questions about you. Some of them are starting to believe the servant's tales. They think you're a prince in disguise, sheepherder. Not a bad thing. There is an old saying here in the Borderlands: 'Better to have one woman on your side than ten men.' The way they are talking among themselves, they're trying to decide whose daughter is strong enough to handle you. If you don't watch your step, sheepherder, you will find yourself married into a Shienaran House before you realize what has happened." LOL! Rand's "troubles" with women cracks me up. And how he's always wishing for Perrin's help. And Perrin's always wishing for Rand's help with women. *snickers* 4. 19% Lan helping Rand before his meeting with the Amyrlin Seat. "The Wheel weaves us all into the Patter as it wills. You have less freedom about it than most, but by the Light, you can still face it on your feet." Is it any wonder I love him? 5. 20% "Cat Crosses the Courtyard! 6. 22% "I will make you a gift and you will take it if I have to chain it around your neck." <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 Mashiara. Beloved of heart and soul, it meant, but a love lost, too. *weeps* 7. 39% Portal Stones - Freaky and awesome. 8. 47% "Your humility, Lan Gaidin, has always been more arrogance than most kings could manages with their armies at their backs." 9. 52% "Nynaeve, please don't leave me." *heart breaks* 10. 53% MIN!!! 11. 55% THOM!!! 12. TROLLOCS IN THE FOREGATE! So awesome. 13. 60% AIEL! Want more! "You call it the Waste," Urien said. "To us it is the Three-fold Land. A shaping stone, to make us; a testing ground, to prove our worth; and a punishment for the sin." "What sin?" "So long ago it was, that none remember. Except the Wise Ones (like Aes Sedai?) and clan chiefs, and they will not speak of it. It must have been a very great sin if they cannot bring themselves to tell us, but the Creator punishes us well." "I search for ... someone. A man. He Who Comes With the Dawn. It is said there will be great signs and portents of his coming....It is said we will know [the signs] when we hear of them, as we will know him when we see him, for he will be marked. He will come from the west, beyond the Spine of the World, but be of our blood. He will go to Rhuidean, and lead us out of the Three-fold Land." He took a spear in his right hand...In the dirt scraped a circle with his spearpoint, then drew across it a sinuous line. "It is said that under this sign, he will conquer." 14. 63% I didn't think much of Bayle Domon in the first book, but I'm beginning to love him. Domon took a deep breath and set about trying to lie his way out of Falme. 15. 67% "Young. Young to carry a heron-mark blade." "I am less than a year old," Rand said automatically, and immediately wished he had it back. It sounded foolish, to his ear, but Verin had said act as he had with the Amyrlin Seat, and that was the answer Lan had given him. A Borderman considered the day he was given his sword to be his nameday. <3 <3 16. 68% Loial. I love him. "Rand, if you don't start being a little careful, you are going to get me in trouble." LOL 17. 73% MAIDENS OF THE SPEAR!!!! OMG. I do need more. I love them already. 18. 86% I don't love it, but Egwene and Tuli nearly broke my heart. 19. 91% The fight with Turak! Awesome. Completely awesome. 20. 93% Nynaeve and Min and Elayne rescue. "I will not go back," Egwene said grimly. "I'll die first. Let me show them what they've taught me." 21. 94% He was staring at the Horn of Valere, he realized. THey all were. The curled, golden Horn hung at Mat's pommel, the focus of every eye. "It has to be there at the Last Battle," Mat said, licking his lips. "Nothing says it can't be used before then." He pulled the Horn free of its lashings and looked at them anxiously. "Nothing says it can't." "We have come to the Horn, but we must follow the banner. And the Dragon." Amazing. I love this part so much. 22. 95% "I like older men," she told him. "I like men with education, and wit. I have no interest in farms, or sheep,l or shepherds. Especially boy shepherds." With a sigh, she smoothed back the hair from his face; he had silky hair. "But then, you aren't a shepherd, are you? Not anymore. Light, why did the Pattern have to catch me up with you? Why couldn't I have something safe and simple, like being shipwrecked with no food and a dozen hungry Aielmen?" 23. 97% "It is said," the one-eyed man said carefully, "that when the Dragon is Reborn, he will break all oaths, shatter all ties. Nothing holds us, now. We would give our oaths to you." (hide spoiler)]

  26. 5 out of 5

    Maryam

    Well, it now starts to come together. Boo one was a little bit boring and confusing for my liking but to my surprise I didn’t find it long. It is very rare that I enjoy a book longer than 500 pages but recently it happened more than once, not sure if it’s me or the books. Kidding, for sure it’s the good books. The story begins right where the first book finished.Rand accompanies his two friend along with a Shienarian army to retrieve the horn from dark friends. Nynaeve and Egwene are going to Whi Well, it now starts to come together. Boo one was a little bit boring and confusing for my liking but to my surprise I didn’t find it long. It is very rare that I enjoy a book longer than 500 pages but recently it happened more than once, not sure if it’s me or the books. Kidding, for sure it’s the good books. The story begins right where the first book finished.Rand accompanies his two friend along with a Shienarian army to retrieve the horn from dark friends. Nynaeve and Egwene are going to White Tower to become Aye Sedai. Rand is struggling with his faith but he forces to channel. I can’t decide yet what I make out of Rand, for sure he is not a strong main character. So much doubt, so much fear, and still confused about too many things, not only him.But then I think maybe that’s how it should be. To see him grow and become he needs to be, should be. I’ll wait to see what’s happening in next books, it’s just the beginning I guess. My most favorite character of book two is Nynaeve, doing everything she can to help her friends from two river. Looks like she sees herself still as their Wisdom and don’t want to give up on them. She is the voice of wisdom so many times when Egwene is all energy, excitement and worry about Rand. Soon I’ll start the third book and I’m sure will be more confused by many new characters. Hell, why there are so many already? How many more are going to be added in next 12 books?

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    Here's a tough decision I think fantasy writers face: What requires detail and what will the reader's imagination run with? Another view: Do you trust your readers to be able to fill in the details? Someone -- I think Neil Gaiman -- once said that Gene Wolfe's writing makes his readers feel smarter. It's because Wolfe trusts his readers to pay attention and to fill in the blanks. How do "The Wheel of Time" books hold up to this approach? It's a little inconsistent. When it comes to winds, cultural tr Here's a tough decision I think fantasy writers face: What requires detail and what will the reader's imagination run with? Another view: Do you trust your readers to be able to fill in the details? Someone -- I think Neil Gaiman -- once said that Gene Wolfe's writing makes his readers feel smarter. It's because Wolfe trusts his readers to pay attention and to fill in the blanks. How do "The Wheel of Time" books hold up to this approach? It's a little inconsistent. When it comes to winds, cultural traditions, and flirting, Jordan can't devote enough words to the most minute details. However, now and then, Jordan does a pretty impressive job of letting our imagination fill in the details. Let's get truly nerdy and talk about swords. When it comes to blades, Jordan reserves all of his details for the tradition of sword fighting, including etiquette, symbols, and craftsmanship. When it comes to actually swinging a sword, Jordan allows our imagination to fill in the blanks. How? Jordan must have devoted a week to writing natural metaphors for thousands of sword strokes. Instead of writing "Rand blocked Lan's swing," Jordan might write "stinging bee met floating butterfly." We could say it's corny. It's certainly easy to parody -- "puking cat was met by belching bear." However, it is a style that leaves room for the reader's imagination to take over. The Great Hunt is one of the most popular novels in "The Wheel of Time," and swords are perhaps an under appreciated part of that popularity. Here, we see Rand as he is on the verge of becoming a blademaster. There are some memorable moments in The Great Hunt, including the scenes where Lan is teaching Rand the sword and when Rand rushes a Seanchan blademaster. In the most fantastic tradition, swordplay is an important part of "The Wheel of Time" because Jordan uses Rand's training to reveal how he matures and faces leadership, not to mention the burden of being a cursed savior figure. Sadly, both duels and a trust for the reader's imagination are largely absent in the later novels. So readers should enjoy it while they can.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    I read the Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan because both my husband and best friend had read them. The best friend highly encouraged me to read the books - my husband warned me off. The warning is not because the books are bad. The first few, actually, are very good. Great character development, interesting universe for those who love fantasy novels. The warning is because these books never, ever, ever are going to end. Ever. There are so far 12 books (including a prequel that came out somewhe I read the Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan because both my husband and best friend had read them. The best friend highly encouraged me to read the books - my husband warned me off. The warning is not because the books are bad. The first few, actually, are very good. Great character development, interesting universe for those who love fantasy novels. The warning is because these books never, ever, ever are going to end. Ever. There are so far 12 books (including a prequel that came out somewhere between books 10 and 11). Each book is close to 1000 pages. I think the last six books have taken place over the book plot timeline of about a month. Seriously. One or two books may have only covered a day or two. No lie. The books start off with just 4-5 main characters...but over time I think there become closer to 20. And everyone rates their own storyline. As the books stand now, I think almost everyone is in a completely different country on a different mission. It can get confusing for those not quite looking for that sort of depth. Nonetheless...once you get far enough in the series you'll keep going. If for no other reason than you feel obligated. At this point, all those of us who've kept us are just praying that Robert Jordan doesn't die before finishing the series because there are so many plot lines left untied. For those serious about fantasy fiction, these books are somewhat of a right of passage. A necessary evil.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Vignesh Kumar

    Another brilliant monstrosity is done! I can't fathom how Jordan created the world. It's so complex with all those nations, tribes and their own world. It's spectacular when he wrote it that early. I am feeling bad that I didn't pick this series earlier. But what can I say? If you look at the series with 14 books, each a monstrosity on their own. I feared I couldn't read it. But now, I am enjoying it so much. The characters have developed so nicely. I loveeee Rand al'Thor. He refuses who he is and Another brilliant monstrosity is done! I can't fathom how Jordan created the world. It's so complex with all those nations, tribes and their own world. It's spectacular when he wrote it that early. I am feeling bad that I didn't pick this series earlier. But what can I say? If you look at the series with 14 books, each a monstrosity on their own. I feared I couldn't read it. But now, I am enjoying it so much. The characters have developed so nicely. I loveeee Rand al'Thor. He refuses who he is and what he can do, in the beginning, but did it anyway to protect the others. I like him as Lord. It suits his character pretty much. The POVs have increased a bit. I love the complicated system of the magical society, Aes Sedai with all their Ajahs and the politics between them. I am so enjoying this series. On to the next one!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Terrington

    And so concludes my first re-read of the second book of The Wheel of Time which I rate as my greatest epic fantasy series read to date. Although if The Malazan Book of the Fallen continues as the first book has promised it might be right up there as well. Of course nothing beats The Lord of the Rings as my favourite epic fantasy novel/and tied favourite novel but that's a different story. As seen in my review of the first book The Eye of the World I love how it's such a sprawling organic world. And so concludes my first re-read of the second book of The Wheel of Time which I rate as my greatest epic fantasy series read to date. Although if The Malazan Book of the Fallen continues as the first book has promised it might be right up there as well. Of course nothing beats The Lord of the Rings as my favourite epic fantasy novel/and tied favourite novel but that's a different story. As seen in my review of the first book The Eye of the World I love how it's such a sprawling organic world. I can see that many people hate the series for running on too much and yes I respect that but personally (I guess since I jumped on the wagon headed for The Last Battle a little later than most fans) I've loved reading such a long series. I prefer this book so much more than the first. Yes the first does have its own charm but to me it's very Tolkienesque and quite clear to see that Robert Jordan had not quite found his own style to write epic fantasy in. Therefore it is the second novel which drew me into the series (and a good thing that I actually began with the second and third novels as they are really the true beginning of all the action with the first novel being able to stand very much on its own when compared to the later books). The Great Hunt follows the three ta'veren introduced to us in the first novel as they pursue a Horn needed for the last battle and a dagger needed to cure one of them. At the same time their female companions are headed to become Aes Sedai (the book's equivalent of female sorceresses). Also introduced into this novel are the Seanchan who make for excellent villains and become more important as the series continues. Also introduced are a group of Aiel and they too focus a lot more in books 3 to 6. I love the magical elements of this series which don't focus so much until my favourite three books to date: 4, 5 and 6. However the fragments of the story and the potential for future magic are still here. And the characters start to reveal the uniqueness and appeal to the audience that sets them all apart. It's very interesting coming back and re-reading this novel in connection to the later novels, seeing it as a weaker book in the overall scheme of things but a book of great importance. Personally book three is the most important one so I suggest that you read up to book three before deciding whether to drop the series or continue onwards. Anyway I have little more to say as much of what I can say about this series is subjective or backed up by other fans. If you want to see something more unique than the first book I recommend you at least try this one and see whether you sense the series is heading somewhere. If you still dislike this novel the series probably is not for you at all. If you're still unsure then continue to book three and if not drawn in by then I suggest abandoning ship. There will always be plenty of fantasy fans for this series and you won't gain anything trying to read a series just because you feel compelled to by the fandom.

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