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L'île Des Dauphins Bleus PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: L'île Des Dauphins Bleus
Author: Scott O'Dell
Publisher: Published 2004 by Pocket jeunesse (first published 1960)
ISBN: 9782266119153
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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In the Pacific there is an island that looks like a big fish sunning itself in the sea. Around it, blue dolphins swim, otters play, and sea elephants and sea birds abound. Once, Indians also lived on the island. And when they left and sailed to the east, one young girl was left behind. — This is the story of Karana, the Indian girl who lived alone for years on the Island o In the Pacific there is an island that looks like a big fish sunning itself in the sea. Around it, blue dolphins swim, otters play, and sea elephants and sea birds abound. Once, Indians also lived on the island. And when they left and sailed to the east, one young girl was left behind. — This is the story of Karana, the Indian girl who lived alone for years on the Island of the Blue Dolphins. Year after year, she watched one season pass into another and waited for a ship to take her away. But while she waited, she kept herself alive by building shelter, making weapons, finding food, and fighting her enemies, the wild dogs. It is not only an unusual adventure of survival, but also a tale of natural beauty and personal discovery.

30 review for L'île Des Dauphins Bleus

  1. 4 out of 5

    karen

    this may be the best book for kids ever written. it teaches young girls everything they will ever need to know in their resourceful lives: how to build a fence out of whale bones, how to kill giant squids, how to alternately befriend and defend against scary wild dogs, and how to make skirts from cormorant feathers. since i got kicked out of brownies and never got to learn All The Things That Girl Scouts Learn, this book taught me how to wilderness-survive. and now i live in queens. so - not muc this may be the best book for kids ever written. it teaches young girls everything they will ever need to know in their resourceful lives: how to build a fence out of whale bones, how to kill giant squids, how to alternately befriend and defend against scary wild dogs, and how to make skirts from cormorant feathers. since i got kicked out of brownies and never got to learn All The Things That Girl Scouts Learn, this book taught me how to wilderness-survive. and now i live in queens. so - not much use for it, but still a book i have such a fondness for. and i have an old copy, too, where they used to make the page-ends colored. mine is green. i need to read this again. and find out why montambo doesnt like it... come to my blog!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    When my defiant preteen daughter stands before me in great protest to any one of my many actions or words, she often resembles Disney's Pocahontas. She has tan skin and black hair that touches her waist and dark eyes that are kept busy with a vigilant observance of the world's injustices (and her mother's shortcomings). If she's not on horseback, then she's standing before you, holding a cat or a small rodent or a dog. (Or a strange, stuffed chinchilla). So, when this middle child of mine receive When my defiant preteen daughter stands before me in great protest to any one of my many actions or words, she often resembles Disney's Pocahontas. She has tan skin and black hair that touches her waist and dark eyes that are kept busy with a vigilant observance of the world's injustices (and her mother's shortcomings). If she's not on horseback, then she's standing before you, holding a cat or a small rodent or a dog. (Or a strange, stuffed chinchilla). So, when this middle child of mine received the Island of the Blue Dolphins for Christmas, I thought. . . how perfect. How perfect for her. She's just shy of 10, and so ready to think herself capable of being away from adults and alone on an island, stringing beads for necklaces and communing with wild dogs. And that's about all I remembered from this 6th grade read of mine: a girl, stranded alone on an island. Wild dogs. Abalone. (Whatever in the hell I thought that was in middle school. I'm quite sure I didn't look it up in a dictionary. Yes, we used to have things in classrooms called dictionaries). Okay, so, stranded island girl, wild dogs, abalone. . . yes, they were all there, waiting to greet me again at my return, but I had forgotten something better. . . this book's ability to provoke some thoughtful conversations. See, this story's not so strong on character development or dialogue (does anyone even speak??), but our island girl, Karana, is faced with many predicaments. Karana's story provides many opportunities to turn to an interested tween and ask with ease, “What would you do?” My daughter was absolutely riveted by the story, from beginning to end, and the most beautiful part for me, in this read-aloud was when the lonely Karana ends up being ushered home by a school of dolphins: a swarm of dolphins appeared. They came swimming out of the west, but as they saw the canoe they turned around in a great circle and began to follow me. They swam up slowly and so close that I could see their eyes, which are large and the color of the ocean. Then they swam on ahead of the canoe, crossing back and forth in front of it, diving in and out, as if they were weaving a piece of cloth with their broad snouts. Dolphins are animals of good omen. It made me happy to have them swimming around the canoe, and though my hands had begun to bleed from the chafing of the paddle, just watching them made me forget the pain. I was very lonely before they appeared, but now I felt that I had friends with me and did not feel the same. My daughter sat up after this passage, and, with tears in her eyes, announced, “Mommy! It was the ancestors! The ancestors sent those dolphins to Karana in her darkest moment, to bring her joy. And that's what animals, do, Mommy, they bring us joy.” And, by the story's end, Karana feels the same way, when she makes the decision to stop killing animals for their hides, feathers and teeth. The island girl realizes that the animals have been her sole companions on this long stretch of isolation and decides that “animals and birds are like people, too, though they do not talk the same or do the same things. Without them the earth would be an unhappy place.” It is a simple story, with very little action or dialogue, but a whole lot of deep thinks and feels for those tricky preteens.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ɗẳɳ 2.☊

    ★★☆☆☆ If this book just so happens to be one of your childhood favorites, and you notice my rating here, you may be asking yourself, “Why must I forever be soiling all the things you hold dear?” Ah, that’s a good question and one that I often ponder myself. But, in fairness, I didn’t actually hate this story. According to the GR rating standards, two and a half stars means it was slightly better than “okay,” but I can’t quite say that I “liked it.” How about I just say it was underwhelming and le ★★☆☆☆½ If this book just so happens to be one of your childhood favorites, and you notice my rating here, you may be asking yourself, “Why must I forever be soiling all the things you hold dear?” Ah, that’s a good question and one that I often ponder myself. But, in fairness, I didn’t actually hate this story. According to the GR rating standards, two and a half stars means it was slightly better than “okay,” but I can’t quite say that I “liked it.” How about I just say it was underwhelming and leave it at that? The story is that of a twelve-year-old girl who, through a series of unfortunate events, winds up marooned on a deserted island. For fear of spoiling things, due to the shortness of the novel, I’ll leave out the particulars which led to her isolation. The writing style is fairly simplistic. I walked here; I paddled there; I made this; I caught that; I built a shelter; I watched for ships; the winds blew heavily; the stars shone brightly; the seasons turned; the years passed. Some of the day to day activity is rather monotonous, but she does go on a few adventures and gathers a few animal companions along the way. One of the highlights, for me, was her battle with the devilfish. Frustratingly though, the details are scarce. What became of the devilfish after the fight, or her pet birds after the Aleutians arrived, or the dozen other nagging little questions I had that were left unanswered? Not only are the details in short supply, but the seasons fly by at a staggering pace. Years are whisked away in a single sentence. “After two more springs had gone, on a morning of white clouds and calm seas, the ship came back.” Also, some of the terminologies seemed outdated or flat out wrong. What’s this about a “swarm of dolphins?” A group of dolphins is known as a pod—they’re not insects, man! Or, what about that “devilfish” business? That’s a rather generic term, don’t you think? Shouldn’t you specify whether it was a squid or an octopus? They’re entirely different species, for heaven’s sake! Typically while reading, I highlight passages, here and there, to use in a review or simply to save for later musings, but not so here. There was nary a passage of note which caught my eye. However, if you pause to consider that this story was written for children (at least I hope it was), with a message that empowers young girls to believe in themselves—believe that they’re more than capable of fending for themselves even in the direst situations—then I think the story deserves the benefit of the doubt and warrants the rounding up of my rating to three stars. There’s really no need to besmirch its good name any further. Lastly, there’s an interesting author’s note at the end of the book which details the inspiration behind the story. It’s stated that O’Dell attempted to recreate the historical account of “The Lost Woman of San Nicolas” - an Indian woman from the nineteenth century who lived alone, on a small island off the coast of California for eighteen years. His story stayed true to much of the known history. Read as part of another Non-Crunchy Cool Classic Buddy Read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    Back in the '70s and early '80s teachers liked to make their students cry, and so they forced them to read books like Island of the Blue Dolphins, which is just the kind of good old fashioned heartbreaking stuff to do the trick! It starts of great this story of a Chumash (local natives to the Santa Barbara, California area) tribe taken by surprise by fur hunters and then taken from their island, accidentally leaving behind a brother and a sister. There is sorrow a'plenty. The tale trots along, ev Back in the '70s and early '80s teachers liked to make their students cry, and so they forced them to read books like Island of the Blue Dolphins, which is just the kind of good old fashioned heartbreaking stuff to do the trick! It starts of great this story of a Chumash (local natives to the Santa Barbara, California area) tribe taken by surprise by fur hunters and then taken from their island, accidentally leaving behind a brother and a sister. There is sorrow a'plenty. The tale trots along, even stepping it up to a steady canter for about the first quarter or third. Then the narrative devolves into a Robinson Crusoe style listing of things done by or to the main character, Karana, while she's stuck alone on an island. As short as Island... is, it grinds on through the middle to a dull (yet somehow still sorrowful!) finish. I figured this weekend was as good time as any to read this while I was visiting Santa Barbara, since the real life story it's based upon happened on one of the islands just off the coast. What would've made this infinitely more compelling would've been the simple adding of motive. If O'dell has suppled Karana a fervent desire to get off the island and get back to her people, that would've given the reader something to pull for. But he did not. I don't know the real story well enough to say, but from what I recall I have a feeling the author was trying to stay true to the actual account. All I have to say for that is, leave that to the biographers and historians. You're writing fact-based fiction here, my friend. You're allowed a little leeway. Rating Note: 3.5

  5. 5 out of 5

    Patricia (theinfophile)

    Might I be bored, annoyed, or disgusted with Scott O'Dell's many works from the viewpoints of young women? If I read them now, sure, I might be. But I SWORE BY Scott O'Dell when I was 10-12 years old, and I think that's what mattered. The girls in the books spoke to me, and they were written for me then, not for the me that is now. I will buy his books for my younger cousins, and hope they get the sense of self and adventure that these short novels offer.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I never read Island of the Blue Dolphins as a child, although I’m positive I wouldn’t have liked it then either. As everyone in Karana’s tribe is evacuating the island, she looks back and realizes her little brother has been left behind. She jumps out of the boat and swims back to the island, where they live there alone until her brother is killed. After his death, she makes friends with an otter and one of the wild dogs that may or may not have killed her brother. Of course, as the days turn in I never read Island of the Blue Dolphins as a child, although I’m positive I wouldn’t have liked it then either. As everyone in Karana’s tribe is evacuating the island, she looks back and realizes her little brother has been left behind. She jumps out of the boat and swims back to the island, where they live there alone until her brother is killed. After his death, she makes friends with an otter and one of the wild dogs that may or may not have killed her brother. Of course, as the days turn into months and the months turn into years, her animal friends move on or pass away, which only makes her even more lonely. In his footnotes, O’Dell says Island of the Blue Dolphins is based on the “the girl Robinson Crusoe [who:] actually lived alone upon this island from 1835 to 1853, and is known to history as The Lost Woman of San Nicolas.” I cannot fathom what that life would be like, but I thought O’Dell’s interpretation was pretty boring. All the action occurred in the beginning and the remainder of the novel is spent waiting for Karana to be rescued. Although, come to find out, being “rescued” isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. Karana’s entire tribe was killed when their boat sunk off the cost of present-day California, and she is unable to communicate with her rescuers, which only further plunges her into loneliness. It’s such a sad, lonely little book that I immediately shoved aside my other books and went to go bug my family into doing something together.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Wanda

    ***Wanda’s Summer Carnival of Children’s Literature*** Well, this was a blast from the past! I remember reading this (probably several times) during grade 5 or 6, maybe both. Funny what I remember from those childhood readings—my take away from it was that girls could do whatever they needed to and just as well as anyone else. Looking at it now through adult eyes, I see a lot more of what the author was trying to do. His wildlife conservation message is “thump you on the head” obvious to me now. I ***Wanda’s Summer Carnival of Children’s Literature*** Well, this was a blast from the past! I remember reading this (probably several times) during grade 5 or 6, maybe both. Funny what I remember from those childhood readings—my take away from it was that girls could do whatever they needed to and just as well as anyone else. Looking at it now through adult eyes, I see a lot more of what the author was trying to do. His wildlife conservation message is “thump you on the head” obvious to me now. I can also admire how he took a historical fact (an Indian woman who had lived alone on a small island off the coast of California for 18 years) and filled in quite believable adventures for her to experience. I can see where nature-loving mini-me would have been captivated by her taming of wild dogs, Western Tanagers and sea otters. Being a child with no playmates of my own age living close by our farm, I also spent a lot of time adventuring alone and could relate to her solitude. For me, this one stood the test of time.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ana

    I'm not crying. It's just raining on my face. I finished this book in record time. #WorthyOfAnOlympicGoldMedal. Full review to come. Probably.

  9. 4 out of 5

    stephanie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. man, fourth grade was a good year for reading! this is another one, and fed my urge to be able to survive on my own even further. this is beautiful because it's based on a true story (she leaves the island with her skirt of cormorant feathers, which is on display at mission santa barbara) and because she was alone for eighteen years, and hid from russians, and dealt with wild dogs, and the loss of her brother. it is beautiful, haunting, and a story of survival. it's also very much a story of cal man, fourth grade was a good year for reading! this is another one, and fed my urge to be able to survive on my own even further. this is beautiful because it's based on a true story (she leaves the island with her skirt of cormorant feathers, which is on display at mission santa barbara) and because she was alone for eighteen years, and hid from russians, and dealt with wild dogs, and the loss of her brother. it is beautiful, haunting, and a story of survival. it's also very much a story of california - the earthquake, the seal hunting, etc. i can appreciate now why ms. hart assigned this to us - at the time, i was simply thrilled i got to read about binding whale bones with seal sinew to make a fence.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ashley *Hufflepuff Kitten*

    You know a book will stay with you forever when you reread it after probably 20 years and still hear your elementary school librarian's voice in your head as you read it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jean

    a children's book, this is my all time favorite. based on the true story of a young woman who had to survive alone on an island for more than 20 years. typical me...i love stories about strong women. i promised myself that when i "grew up," i would visit the grave-site of the woman who inspired the book. when i lived in california, i finally made my way to the mission in santa barbara where she was buried. for a moment i was able to flash back to my childhood self looking into the future...and i a children's book, this is my all time favorite. based on the true story of a young woman who had to survive alone on an island for more than 20 years. typical me...i love stories about strong women. i promised myself that when i "grew up," i would visit the grave-site of the woman who inspired the book. when i lived in california, i finally made my way to the mission in santa barbara where she was buried. for a moment i was able to flash back to my childhood self looking into the future...and i was moved that i kept the promise.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Hellokitty

    The book that I read was," Island Of The Blue Dolphins" this book was great! It is about a girl named Karana, and she is from an indian tribe, she lives on an island called," The Island Of The Blue Dolphins". Her father is the chief of the tribe, she has an older sister and younger brother. One day some people came and battled them, and her father dies. After this some more people come to their island, and try to help them, so the people gather some belongings and get on the ship. Her brother f The book that I read was," Island Of The Blue Dolphins" this book was great! It is about a girl named Karana, and she is from an indian tribe, she lives on an island called," The Island Of The Blue Dolphins". Her father is the chief of the tribe, she has an older sister and younger brother. One day some people came and battled them, and her father dies. After this some more people come to their island, and try to help them, so the people gather some belongings and get on the ship. Her brother forgets something that he really needs, and goes back to their home tent, he comes back and the boat has already left, but Karana has already jumped out of the boat to be with her brother so she ends up going into the sea to look for him, but eventually she stays in the sea forgetting about her brother and hangs out with the dolphins. The Author's purpose in this book was to show that women can do things for themselves, and women are strong, but I didn't know until I finished the book that it was a true story. The tone of the book was adventurous and mysterious, because it contained adventure on how Karana used to love when she swam with the dolphins her hair used to glow beautifully in the water when she came up for air. The book was also mysterious in a way, because the author never explained how did she end up with the dolphins and how they began to teach,nurture, and protect her from other predators. The strengths of this book is that it engages the reader's interest and paints a picture with descriptive words. My final thoughts of the book are that the author was trying to paint a picture of women being independent, and how women today are independent by working, going to school, and protecting theirself on their own. So my final thoughts of the book was that the author's message was to explain how women are independent.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Abby

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book was freaking awesome. I loved it when I was a kid. All of the people on an island are leaving together one day, on a boat. I don't remember why. Anyhow, the main character's little brother got left behind on the shore. (What, they didn't think to do a head count before launching the boat?) She jumps off and swims back to be with him. The boat apparently drives only forward, and not in reverse, or they are in a really big hurry. I know this because they don't come back and get her or he This book was freaking awesome. I loved it when I was a kid. All of the people on an island are leaving together one day, on a boat. I don't remember why. Anyhow, the main character's little brother got left behind on the shore. (What, they didn't think to do a head count before launching the boat?) She jumps off and swims back to be with him. The boat apparently drives only forward, and not in reverse, or they are in a really big hurry. I know this because they don't come back and get her or her brother. They live on the island alone. Then, her brother gets eaten by wolves. (I remember thinking at this point, darn it! I bet she wishes she hadn't stayed now. If he was just going to get eaten by wolves either way, she might as well have stayed on the boat and be eating fresh sea bass right now.) Finally, she leaves the island. I recall it being many years later. She put a bunch of paint on her face and got dressed all pretty, because she was old enough to date by then, and thought there might be a cute guy on the rescue boat or something. If I recall, her people had disappeared and no one knew what had happened to them. Hey, maybe it wasn't such a bad thing that she missed the boat, after all! This book was awesome. I read it several times. I can't believe how many books I read and re-read and re-re-read. I could have finished the encyclopedia by now if I'd only focused on reading new things as a kid. (By the way, I LOVED reading the encyclopedia when I was a kid. It rocks.)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn Cantrell

    This was the best book in my early elementary years. I remember my first grade teacher, Mrs. Hendrickson, reading it to us over the course of a few weeks in serial form. I read it myself in third grade. And now, out of nostalgia (can you be nostaligic for your 8-10 year-old self?), I'm re-reading it. I remembered it as the adventurous, though sad, life of a young girl. Now it seems less about adventure and much more about the heart-breaking trials of a lonely girl, left alone and for dead. What t This was the best book in my early elementary years. I remember my first grade teacher, Mrs. Hendrickson, reading it to us over the course of a few weeks in serial form. I read it myself in third grade. And now, out of nostalgia (can you be nostaligic for your 8-10 year-old self?), I'm re-reading it. I remembered it as the adventurous, though sad, life of a young girl. Now it seems less about adventure and much more about the heart-breaking trials of a lonely girl, left alone and for dead. What the hell. Now that I realize this, I'm realizing no contemporary child will ever be allowed to read it. I'm actually shocked that I was not protected from this story... times were different, apparently. Whatever. I'm making my kids read this no matter how hard they cry.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Corinne Edwards

    This is a book that I read outloud to my two older children, ages 8 and 6. We LOVED IT. Here's my 8 year old daughter's thoughts: It's about a girl a girl who is left on an island and she has to survive by herself. She makes her own weapons and she makes her own house that she makes with whale ribs for a fence. They used seaweed to tie the whale ribs together. That was my favorite part. I liked the ending, even though there were sad parts. From my 6 year old: I liked about how she made weapons. I l This is a book that I read outloud to my two older children, ages 8 and 6. We LOVED IT. Here's my 8 year old daughter's thoughts: It's about a girl a girl who is left on an island and she has to survive by herself. She makes her own weapons and she makes her own house that she makes with whale ribs for a fence. They used seaweed to tie the whale ribs together. That was my favorite part. I liked the ending, even though there were sad parts. From my 6 year old: I liked about how she made weapons. I liked how she made friends with animals on the island. I love when a book fits the three of us so well. The story and setting feel expertly researched and authentic. Sometimes, when we had a chapter where we learned the details of Indian life and culture, it reminded me of Little House on the Prairie, especially when we learned how to dry food or make a skirt. There was certainly a lot of adventure, more than you'd think when a girl is living on an island by herself. Whilst reading a part where some wild dogs are having a bloody battle, my son actually gasped and yelled, "THIS is AWESOME!!!" We all liked how many animals she interacted with - and the animals were the impetus for much of the emotion in the story. During one scene with an animal, I actually teared up as I was reading aloud. Karana (the main character) is tough and resourceful and she has to deal with way too much tragedy. Yet, part of what I liked is how she never sat like a lump and wanted to give up. Things get destroyed? Rebuild. All your food washes away/gets eaten? Collect more. She was a great example to my kids and we had some really interesting discussions about the hard things she deals with. At one point (you'll know when you read it, near the beginning), I worried that maybe it would be a bit too intense, but my kids took it in stride better than I did. I read my kids the author's notes at the end too and we had a great talk about historical fiction. My kids wanted to know specifically what was real and what wasn't (I can relate to that!) and I could tell them, thanks to O'Dell's great notes. This one was a winner for us :)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Allison Barilone

    Can I be honest? I read this back in school, probably in 5th or 6th grade. (At least I think I did.) I just finished it at the age of 29 and I found myself fighting to get through it. When I started it in June, I was excited but I couldn't keep up the enthusiasm past a few chapters. It was incredibly boring. It just plodded along and didn't get better. How do middle grade children get through this book? I don't think it's a classic because it truly failed to engage me. The 2 stars are for the re Can I be honest? I read this back in school, probably in 5th or 6th grade. (At least I think I did.) I just finished it at the age of 29 and I found myself fighting to get through it. When I started it in June, I was excited but I couldn't keep up the enthusiasm past a few chapters. It was incredibly boring. It just plodded along and didn't get better. How do middle grade children get through this book? I don't think it's a classic because it truly failed to engage me. The 2 stars are for the relationship the MC had with the wild dog. That was the only part I enjoyed. Just being honest.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    The first half of the book was very slow, almost to the point where I was bored, but I kept reminding myself of the audience for which it was written and pushed forward. Karana's time alone on the island made me feel very sad; I could really identify with her loneliness, especially when she tried to row her canoe to the mainland. Nothing frightens me more than the thought of being alone in a small vessel surrounded by endless miles of water, and I shared the fear which eventually caused her to t The first half of the book was very slow, almost to the point where I was bored, but I kept reminding myself of the audience for which it was written and pushed forward. Karana's time alone on the island made me feel very sad; I could really identify with her loneliness, especially when she tried to row her canoe to the mainland. Nothing frightens me more than the thought of being alone in a small vessel surrounded by endless miles of water, and I shared the fear which eventually caused her to turn back to her island home. Karana was a very resourceful and compassionate young woman. I was amazed that she was able to survive 18 years alone by making meals, implements, clothing, and even jewelry from plants, wildlife, and local objects. She grew to love the animals and birds with whom she shared the island, nursing some of the wounded back to health and training some to be "household" pets. After reading the Author's Note at the end of the book, a search of the internet revealed several websites detailing the account of the real woman who inspired this story. There are conflicting reports because no one in California understood her language. I found this article about the archaeological dig on the island to be very interesting. It seems that the "Lone Woman of San Nicolas Island" was very happy to leave the island in favour of human companionship. However, it appears that life in California was not the best thing for her, for she had been on the mainland only seven weeks when she died.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kellyn Roth

    I started this forrreeevvveeerr ago, but never finished it. I'm told it's decent; ten-year-old me just got bored. Who knows why. ;)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Urges

    A traumatic tale of a young girl abandoned on an island. Turns out I did not read this as a child, though I thought I had. I have an image in my head after all these years that I thought belonged to this book. Now I’m curious to know what source it originates from.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

    One of the key elements for historical fiction authenticity is research. Cohesive blending of facts and fiction along with atmosphere authenticity and delivery are also contributing factors. So it’s no wonder Scott O’Dell won the John Newberry Medal for “Island of the Blue Dolphins.” It’s well-written, brilliantly constructed, atmospheric, eloquently Spartan, fluid, and obviously well-researched. And thinking about the publishing date – 1960 – I’m especially in awe in regards to O’Dell’s researc One of the key elements for historical fiction authenticity is research. Cohesive blending of facts and fiction along with atmosphere authenticity and delivery are also contributing factors. So it’s no wonder Scott O’Dell won the John Newberry Medal for “Island of the Blue Dolphins.” It’s well-written, brilliantly constructed, atmospheric, eloquently Spartan, fluid, and obviously well-researched. And thinking about the publishing date – 1960 – I’m especially in awe in regards to O’Dell’s research and presentation. Prior to the computer age the amount of time and legwork involved in research must have been staggering. Sometimes, though, when reading a vintage work we forget that data wasn't easy to come by in those days; one had to go hither and yon gathering information, handwriting copious amounts of notes, and manually compiling it all into some kind of workable format. After all, not only were personal computers not in existence, copy machines, cell phones, fax machines, digital cameras, scanners, and Fed-Ex didn't exist either. Of course, technology is only a tool. It is the gift of talent, the mastery of proficiency, and tutelage to craft that most distinguishes a good story from a great one. In which “Island of the Blue Dolphins” is an engaging and entertaining great story that young and old alike can enjoy – a noteworthy and unique work of historical fiction. And when thinking about the publishing date, its thirty-year popularity, and the amount of time and effort O’Dell and/or others put into research – “Island of the Blue Dolphins” becomes an exceptionally great, five-star top pick.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bubbles74454

    I'm in sixth grade and we read this book in class. A ship comes and takes villagers from the village of Ghalas-at East. But a young girl named Karana gets left behind. Karana waits for the ship to come back. While she does she goes after animals, builds shelter, gets food, whatever she has to do to survive. The central idea of this story is it takes hard work to survive on an island. Karana goes out everyday at dawn and returns at sunset. That is a very long time to be out and working. She has I'm in sixth grade and we read this book in class. A ship comes and takes villagers from the village of Ghalas-at East. But a young girl named Karana gets left behind. Karana waits for the ship to come back. While she does she goes after animals, builds shelter, gets food, whatever she has to do to survive. The central idea of this story is it takes hard work to survive on an island. Karana goes out everyday at dawn and returns at sunset. That is a very long time to be out and working. She has to catch abalones, spear fish everyday to eat. There is a ravine where she has to walk to to catch water to drink. She makes her own clothes and jewelry and she builds shelter,and weapons are also made by her.Karana makes all these things by being resourceful. Scott O' Dell created a book that was very fun and interesting to read, it was hard to put down the book.Scott O' Dell was very descriptive throughout this book and used lots of details. This book wasn't to hard to read, it didn't have much dialogue and some of the vocabulary was a little tough. But overall it was an excellent reading level and fun to read.I would recommend this book to someone who loves a great adventure.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    me: 4 stars son (age 10): 2 stars daughter (age 5): 2 stars I quite enjoyed this audio book overall, although after having just listened to The Cay, it felt a bit slow. I enjoyed all the relationships the MC developed with the various animals on the island in the absence of human companionship. My kids did not enjoy it as much and were happy to be done with it. My son said that there was not enough "action" and that there was "too much talk about feelings". He would have given it 1.5 stars, except me: 4 stars son (age 10): 2 stars daughter (age 5): 2 stars I quite enjoyed this audio book overall, although after having just listened to The Cay, it felt a bit slow. I enjoyed all the relationships the MC developed with the various animals on the island in the absence of human companionship. My kids did not enjoy it as much and were happy to be done with it. My son said that there was not enough "action" and that there was "too much talk about feelings". He would have given it 1.5 stars, except that he did enjoy a couple of the humorous bits such as when the tame birds would swoop down and steal fur from the dog's back to use in their nests. My daughter said that she didn't like the parts about the father, brother, and dog dying. Understandable. I think we need to switch gears and pick out a book that is not a survival story for our next audio book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Reading a book for a second time, separated by 33 years is a curious thing. I can recall the when and where of my first reading, and the basic plot, but the rest was just echos between the covers. My daughter wanted to read this with me and I'm glad that I re-read an excellent work for young readers and had the opportunity to discuss the book with her. And had I not read this for a second time I might not have learned that this story was based upon a real event; a girl turned woman that was left Reading a book for a second time, separated by 33 years is a curious thing. I can recall the when and where of my first reading, and the basic plot, but the rest was just echos between the covers. My daughter wanted to read this with me and I'm glad that I re-read an excellent work for young readers and had the opportunity to discuss the book with her. And had I not read this for a second time I might not have learned that this story was based upon a real event; a girl turned woman that was left on an island alone for 18 years in the mid 1800s. Why was that not told to our class when we read this in 1982?

  24. 5 out of 5

    Huy

    Truyện dựa trên một sự kiện có thật, có nghĩa là có một cô gái đã bị bỏ quên trên một hòn đảo nhỏ giữa đại dương mênh mông suốt 18 năm và không ai biết cô đã sống sót như thế nào. Dĩ nhiên Scott O'dell có những giả thuyết của riêng mình, và ông đã viết nên một câu chuyện cảm động về một cô gái kiên cường. Cuốn sách này dành cho trẻ em thì quá xá đỉnh, vì không chỉ học được sự dũng cảm, tình yêu, bí quyết sống sót trên hoang đảo mà còn học được bao điều về thiên nhiên tươi đẹp, về những loài động Truyện dựa trên một sự kiện có thật, có nghĩa là có một cô gái đã bị bỏ quên trên một hòn đảo nhỏ giữa đại dương mênh mông suốt 18 năm và không ai biết cô đã sống sót như thế nào. Dĩ nhiên Scott O'dell có những giả thuyết của riêng mình, và ông đã viết nên một câu chuyện cảm động về một cô gái kiên cường. Cuốn sách này dành cho trẻ em thì quá xá đỉnh, vì không chỉ học được sự dũng cảm, tình yêu, bí quyết sống sót trên hoang đảo mà còn học được bao điều về thiên nhiên tươi đẹp, về những loài động vật hoang dã mà ta có thể làm bạn. Có ba mẹ nào mua cho con mình đọc cuốn này chưa? :3

  25. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Markus

    Time to catch up on reviewing books I actually read a few months ago! I haven't read this since I was a child. I didn't get much out of it then. It's a beautiful book, but seemed frighteningly somber to me. Also, I was (and kind of still am) all about dialogue, and the main character, Karana, spends several years completely alone on an island. So I respected this book, but didn't feel any urge to reread it as a kid. I reread it as an adult because I've been reading James Loewen's Lies My Teacher T Time to catch up on reviewing books I actually read a few months ago! I haven't read this since I was a child. I didn't get much out of it then. It's a beautiful book, but seemed frighteningly somber to me. Also, I was (and kind of still am) all about dialogue, and the main character, Karana, spends several years completely alone on an island. So I respected this book, but didn't feel any urge to reread it as a kid. I reread it as an adult because I've been reading James Loewen's Lies My Teacher Told Me and am feeling a keen interest in popular representations of Native Americans. I'm impressed that this book is the modern classic it is, because it certainly steers clear of the annoying stereotypes one so often sees. Karana's people aren't unrealistically pure, innocent, selfless people, helpless and pitiful in the face of white invaders. They are the sympathetic characters in a conflict sparked by greedy Russian hunters. (When in doubt, blame the Ruskies.) And Karana kicks arse in terms of being able to take care of herself entirely on her own. She makes a shelter, learns to bow-hunt, and staves off loneliness by cultivating relationships with awesome wild animals. Given that living all by myself with no one but otters and the occasional friendly wolf for company is a dream come true for me, I think the only reason I didn't cotton more to this book as a child is that Karana has very little personality. She is strong and occasionally humorous, but I couldn't imagine being or befriending her. My feelings about this book now are very much what they were when I was young: this is a brilliant, interesting but rather remote story to me. There's a reason it's a modern classic, so do pick it up if you haven't already read it. And read it to your kids on cold winter nights. It'll help you appreciate the luxuries of home and hearth and good warm food.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cherie

    I enjoyed the story very much. I am pretty sure I must have read it in school when I was much younger, but did not remember the story at all. The dog's name, Rontu, did seem familiar. I suspect that one of my daughters read it in grade school. Imagine being completely alone on an island for 18 years. The story is based on a real person and there was documentation about the time that she lived there all alone, until she was taken to the Mission at Santa Barbara, in California. Mr. O'Dell told a v I enjoyed the story very much. I am pretty sure I must have read it in school when I was much younger, but did not remember the story at all. The dog's name, Rontu, did seem familiar. I suspect that one of my daughters read it in grade school. Imagine being completely alone on an island for 18 years. The story is based on a real person and there was documentation about the time that she lived there all alone, until she was taken to the Mission at Santa Barbara, in California. Mr. O'Dell told a very compelling story of a strong young Indian woman and her animal friends.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    When Karana's brother and father die and the rest of her indian tribe go away to another island, she remains on the Island of the Blue Dolphins and has to fend for herself against the wild dogs and other animals. Can she survive? Read on and find out for yourself. This was a pretty good read so def check this one out. It is available at your local library and wherever books are sold.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jane Stewart

    3 stars. This was nice. Good for kids. Historical fiction inspired by a woman who lived alone on an island for 18 years. She was found and taken to California in 1853. The story begins when she was 12 and left on the island when the rest of her community was taken on a ship to the mainland. The story is about how she survives and what her life is like -- what she eats, how she finds food, makes tools, makes a home, etc. A dog becomes her friend. She does not want to kill animals other than fish. 3 ½ stars. This was nice. Good for kids. Historical fiction inspired by a woman who lived alone on an island for 18 years. She was found and taken to California in 1853. The story begins when she was 12 and left on the island when the rest of her community was taken on a ship to the mainland. The story is about how she survives and what her life is like -- what she eats, how she finds food, makes tools, makes a home, etc. A dog becomes her friend. She does not want to kill animals other than fish. I preferred Hatchet by Gary Paulsen. In Hatchet a boy is stranded alone in the Canadian wilderness. That book is full of exciting and unusual things. Hatchet is more fun as well as educational. DATA: Narrative mode: 1st person. Story length: 194 pages. Swearing language: none. Sexual content: none. Setting: 1800s on an island in the Pacific. Copyright: 1960. Genre: childrens fiction.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Paterra

    In the novel "Island of the Blue Dolphins", the main character is Karana. She is the daughter of the chief of the tribe that lives on the island, "Island of the Blue Dolphins". She also has an older sister, a mom, and a little brother. Her and the others from the tribe hunt and gather their own food, make their clothing, and build their shelter. They are very independent and are the only people who inhabit the island. During this novel, the tribe is visited by foreigners who wish to hunt the ot In the novel "Island of the Blue Dolphins", the main character is Karana. She is the daughter of the chief of the tribe that lives on the island, "Island of the Blue Dolphins". She also has an older sister, a mom, and a little brother. Her and the others from the tribe hunt and gather their own food, make their clothing, and build their shelter. They are very independent and are the only people who inhabit the island. During this novel, the tribe is visited by foreigners who wish to hunt the otter who live on the island in trade for weapons and gold. The foreigners hunt for a long time and kill nearly all of the otter on the island. When the foriegners are about to leave, instead of trading with the tribe for all of the otter they have killed, they attack the tribe and make a quick get-a-way. During the attack many of the tribe members die, including Karana's father. After the hunters left, food on the island was very scarce and the tribe was forced to move to a neighboring island. While the tribe was leaving, Karana and her brother were left behind. They had to live on the island by themselves while they waited for a boat to come back for them. Karana builds herself a home, fights and tames wild dogs,hunts and makes weapons, and even more. The genre of this novel is adeventure because there is much throughout. The author also uses very descriptive language and uses many sensory details. During most of the story the author has a very lively tone but at times gets very sad. A person who likes adventure would like this book, but I would recommend it to anyone.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sheila

    I feel deceived. I was really enjoying this young adult novel, and enjoying the story of the survival of a girl alone on an island off the coast of California, until I finished the book and read in the Author's Note that this book is based on a real woman, who survived all alone for 18 years on San Nicolas Island off the coast of southern California from 1835 till she was "rescued" in 1853. Since the author named her as "The Lost Woman of San Nicolas" I did a search to learn more about this fasci I feel deceived. I was really enjoying this young adult novel, and enjoying the story of the survival of a girl alone on an island off the coast of California, until I finished the book and read in the Author's Note that this book is based on a real woman, who survived all alone for 18 years on San Nicolas Island off the coast of southern California from 1835 till she was "rescued" in 1853. Since the author named her as "The Lost Woman of San Nicolas" I did a search to learn more about this fascinating, strong, brave woman. Then I became sad, and almost horrified, to learn that this fascinating, strong, brave woman died a scant 7 weeks after being "rescued" due to dysentery. If only they had left her alone. If only they had allowed her to be. She survived brilliantly for 18 years, then died in weeks. Her death is not mentioned in this book or author note at all, which is why I feel deceived. Apparently, this book is required reading for many children, especially those in California. Are they ever told the complete truth of this brave woman? Or do they only get this novel's sanitized version?

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